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Society for Social Studies of Science

The STS Profession

Announcements

Events

Calls for Papers

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Submitting items to 4S and Technoscience Updates

Please email items for the 4S “Profession” pages and the Technoscience Updates newsletter to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Items may be edited for length. Please include a URL for the complete and authoritative information.

The monthly deadline for inclusion in the newsletter is the 7th.

Events

Events include paper calls for conferences, workshops, lectures, seminars, and exhibits (listed in chronological order).

THE CENTER FOR CYBER, LAW AND POLICY

June 28 2017 | Haifa, Israel

Deadline: June 01 2017

http://weblaw.haifa.ac.il/en/Events/Pages/events/cyber280617.aspx

Updated: May 08 2017

CALL FOR PROPOSALS 2017

CCLP invites scholars, researchers, young scientists, graduate and post-doctoral students, and experts in cyber law and policy, to apply for research grants in the tracks described below.

THE CENTER FOR CYBER, LAW AND POLICY

The Center for Cyber, Law and Policy (CCLP) was established by the University of Haifa in collaboration with the National Cyber Bureau. The Center seeks to develop the academic research necessary to inform public policy while addressing cyber challenges. Taking an interdisciplinary approach to law and policy, the center integrates legal research, computer science, data science, social science and innovative technologies, to develop a new "toolkit" for policymaking while addressing governance, national security, innovation, competition and civil rights in the digital ecosystem.

RESEARCH THEMES

CCLP will support selected research proposals related to cyber policy challenges, including the following themes:

Protection of critical infrastructure

Encryption regulation and standard setting

Cloud computing: storage, privacy and security challenges

Privacy: technology and policy (e.g., privacy by design, biometrics)

Artificial Intelligence, Algorithmic decision-making, Machine Learning

Robot Law

Cyber Attacks: legal, ethical and policy implications

Cyber and the Rule of Law (e.g., civil rights, theories of governance)

National and transnational aspects of Cyber regulation

Cyber implications to International Humanitarian Law

Law and policy implications of Big Data

Accountability and risk management in cyber-security (e.g., liability, insurance)

Economic implications of cyber-technologies (e.g., innovation, market regulation)

Digital monitoring and detection (e.g., inciting materials, image forgery detection)

Cyber, ethics and social norms

Cyber terrorism

Interdisciplinary and collaborative research, both by researchers within the university and with other researchers from Israel and abroad is encouraged. 2

FUNDING TRACKS AND ELIGIBILITY

CCLP will support research projects in each of the following tracks:

FELLOWS/VISITORS TRACK

Eligibility: Faculty, Fellows and Doctoral Students, of any accredited academic institution, interested in pursuing a research project towards an academic publication (e.g., peer review journal, book, patent).

Visitors will be appointed as Visiting Fellow (senior, or post-docs) at the University of Haifa.

Funding will be up to 60,000 NIS. Funding may cover scholarship during the visit (from 1 month to 6 months), travel and research expenses.

EXPLORATORY TRACK

Eligibility: Faculty, Academic Affiliates, or Graduate Students (doctoral or masters students) enrolled at the University of Haifa.

Funding: up to 10,000 NIS.

Funding may cover scholarship, travel and research expenses.

RESEARCH TRACK

Eligibility: open to faculty member at the University of Haifa and any prominent academics or professional experts working in collaboration with a faculty member as Co-PIs on a joint proposal.

Funding up to 200,000 NIS.

GENERAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Grant recipients will be expected

To lead their own research agenda, as well as collaborate with the CCLP faculty and fellows, and to contribute to the building of its academic community.

To participate in a bi-weekly research seminar (for long term recipients), or to present their work at a CCLP conference/workshop.

To submit a final research report describing the outcome of the research,

To submit a paper for publication resulting from the research. Each publication supported by the grant will include an acknowledgment of CCLP.

DEADLINE

Completed applications must be sent to cyber@univ.haifa.ac.il and received by June 1, 2017 3

APPLICATION

All applications must be completed in English and submitted electronically, clearly stating the track of submission.

Applications should include:

1. Curriculum Vitae of PIs including a list of publications.

2. A Research Proposal: up to three-page description of the proposed research and its relevance to the current call. Additional supporting material can be submitted and will be read at the discretion of the referees. The research proposal should include

- A clear presentation of the research questions, its relevance to cyber, law and policy, the state of the art, and the proposed solutions, methodologies or technical approaches the research intends to set forth, and their novelty. - The qualification of the research team to perform the proposed research.

- A research plan and timetable, demonstrating the feasibility of conducting the proposed research within the time and funding limitations.

3. A research budget. Where applicable, indicate whether additional support is provided by other sources.

REVIEW

All proposal will be peer reviewed. Selection for funding will be determined by CCLP's Scientific Committee on the bases of academic excellence and the availability of resources. All funding decisions are subject to approval by the CCLP Steering Committee.

CCLP reserves full discretion as to awarding grants, including the option of not awarding any grant under this CFP. Decisions on funding are expected in early July.

The 12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning

June 18 2017 to June 22 2017 | Drexel University & The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

http://www.isls.org/cscl/2017

Updated: May 08 2017

Conference theme: Making a Difference — Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL

Computer Supported Collaborative Learning is a premier conference of the International Society of the Learning Sciences that focuses on the study of social learning processes with and without technology as well as the development and evaluation of tools to enhance or improve collective thinking and learning. The conference is a major international event bringing together researchers with a wide variety of backgrounds and research interests including educational technology, design, HCI, information sciences, educational psychology, museum research, library science, curriculum and instruction, psychology, computer science, cognitive science, and many more. We welcome high quality conceptual, empirical, and theoretical contributions.

This year's conference theme focuses on the need to consider issues such as equity, access, and inclusion in the design, implementation, and deployment of computer-supported learning environments. CSCL 2017 will prioritize keynote speakers, workshops and papers that champion research and tools focused on equity and access relative to CSCL. Hosted by a diverse leadership team in the Learning Sciences, the conference will highlight work that discusses ways to broaden the CSCL pipeline, promotes and/or celebrates out of the box thinking, or that brings a wide range of viewpoints or voices to CSCL topics or tools.

For more information, see the conference website and/or contact cscl.philly@gmail.com.

About ISLS

The International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS) is a professional society dedicated to the interdisciplinary empirical investigation of learning as it exists in real-world settings and how learning may be facilitated both with and without technology. ISLS sponsors two professional conferences, held in alternate years. Visit the ISLS site at http://www.isls.org.

Mixing Pop and Politics

December 04 2017 to December 06 2017 | Massey University, Wellington, Aotearoa/New Zealand

Deadline: June 01 2017

Updated: May 08 2017

Subversion, Resistance and Reconciliation in Popular Music IASPM-ANZ 2017 Conference

Forty years ago, the story goes, punk broke. Not for the first time, and not the last. History provides us with ample examples of the power of popular music to speak to, through, and against various political moments. The contemporary situation also offers countless opportunities to explore how popular music revisits, reconstitutes, rewrites and reconciles itself to this past. At the same time, it also points to new directions informed by the complicated position popular music occupies in relation to the shifting paradigms of power in which we currently find ourselves. This IASPM-ANZ conference aims to explore the complex politics of resistance, subversion, containment and reconciliation from now and then, as well as points in-between.

We are seeking papers and panel proposals that touch on, but are not restricted to, the following areas:

• (We’re) Stranded: Punk and Post-Punk in Australia, New Zealand and Beyond • I Will Survive: The Politics of Pleasure and Popular Music • You Don’t Own Me: Cultivating, Codifying and Commodifying Resistance • You've Got the Power: Populism, Authoritarianism, Anarchy and Popular Music • This Machine Kills Fascists: Technologies, Politics and Popular Music • The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Popular Music on Screen(s) • Here’s Where The Story Ends: Alternate Histories of Popular Music • Last Night a DJ Saved My Life: Of DJs, Dancefloors and Discos • We Are the Robots: Resistant, Reconciled, Reconstituted, Recombinant Bodies in Popular Music • If You’re Feeling Sinister: Affect, Emotion and the Subversive Power of Popular Music • Playing With a Different Sex: Otherness and Othering in Popular Music • A Whisper to a Scream: Silence, Distortion, Amplification and the Politics of Sound

Abstracts should be no more than 250 words, and should include 3-5 keywords. Please submit abstracts in doc, docx, rtf format, and send as “last name.xxx” to iaspmanz2017@gmail.com

Deadline for abstract submission: June 1st 2017.

All participants must be members of IASPM. If you are not a member, details on how to join are available here: http://iaspm.org.au/membership/.

We encourage all members of IASPM-International to consider attending.

13th IFIP TC9 Human Choice and Computers Conference

September 17 2017 to September 21 2017 | Poznan, Poland

Deadline: January 15 2018

http://www.hcc13.net

Updated: May 08 2017

"This Changes Everything" --€“ in conjunction with the World Computer Congress
Conference Chairs: David Kreps, Kai Kimppa, Louise Leenen, Charles Ess

Conference Theme - Track Chairs: David Kreps and Charles Ess

This Changes Everything. Many of us likely associate this phrase with Steve Jobs’ introduction of the iPhone in 2007. But there are clearly other candidates for the "€ This,"€ e.g., the oncoming bioinformatics redesign of species or the fourth industrial revolution of artificially intelligent robots. But "This" is also, without question, the greatest challenge of our age: climate change.

Accordingly, the 13th Human Choice and Computers conference centers on the question: ICT and Climate Change - What Can We Do? The Conference invites both academics and practitioners in the field of ICTs and Society to take stock of their engagements, review their focus, and assess what and how each and every one of us might be able to contribute to the transformations needed (and already beginning) in local, regional, national and international contexts, towards becoming the diverse, environmentally and socially conscious, and thriving communities.

We welcome submissions that speak directly and less directly to the conference theme. “This Changes Everything†implicates both climate change and the interrelated global challenges most central to the Working Groups of TC9 and its National Society representatives, including the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Submissions are also welcome, not just to the General Conference Track on change, but to the other foci of the Track Themes. (For complete track descriptions, please see the extended CFP on the conference website, http://www.hcc13.net .)

Track themes: * Societal implications, effects and impacts of artificial intelligence - Track Chairs: Diane Whitehouse and Christopher Zielinski (WG9.2)

* Including critical issues beyond the ICT context in codes of conduct/ethics - Track Chairs: Kai Kimppa and Penny Duquenoy (SIG9.2.2)

* Our digital lives - Track Chairs: Petros Chamakiotis and Brad McKenna (WG9.5)

* This changed everything - Track Chair: Christopher Leslie (WG9.7)

* Gender in ICT - Track Chairs: Sisse Finken, Christina Mörtberg and Johanna Sefyrin (WG9.8)

* ICT and sustainability - Track Chairs: Thomas Lennerfors and Per Fors (WG9.9)

* Climate risk, cyber-security, and the dark web - Track Chair: Louise Leenen (WG9.10)

* Privacy, data protection, and automation - Track Chair: Taro Komukai (Japan National Representative)

* ICT and an inclusive society - Track Chairs: Hossana Twinomurinzi and Jackie Phahlamohlaka (South Africa National Representative)

Submissions Full papers are invited that address the Conference Theme, or any of the above Track Themes. All papers will be subject to double-blind review. Authors of accepted papers will be invited to revise their work in keeping with reviewers’ comments prior to formatting, and inclusion in the Programme and Proceedings. Travel, accommodation and all other details will be posted when available at http://www.hcc13.net/

Submissions will be through Springer OCS Website, with proceedings published in the AICT Springer Book series immediately prior to the conference.

Important Dates Full paper deadline 15th January 2018 Reviews and revisions during February, March and April, 2018. Final Papers by 30th April, 2018.

CFP: Strategic Narratives of Technology and Africa

September 01 2017 to September 02 2017 | Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute, Funchal, Portugal

Deadline: May 12 2017

http://snta.m-iti.org/

Updated: May 08 2017

Thematic Overview

In 1884, a group of thirteen European policymakers met to negotiate standards for the "effective occupation" of Africa. At the time of this now-infamous Berlin Conference, about 10 percent of Africa was under European control. By 1914 Europe "controlled" 90 percent of the continent.

In 1987, a little over one hundred years after Berlin, a group of technologists from fifteen European countries met on the island of Madeira, and in a highly fractious and politicized meeting set standards to divide time and radio spectrum, narrowly agreeing on the technical specification of the GSM mobile telephone system. At the time less than 1 percent of Africa was covered by phones. By 2014 mobile "penetration" in sub-Saharan Africa was around 80 percent.

Africa was never mentioned in the Madeira meeting. Indeed the UK representative described the spread of GSM to people globally, including those who "live in the poorest countries on the planet," as an "unintended consequence." Yet, mobiles have been described as "the new talking drums" (de Bruijn), and a "communication lifeline" (Pew Research Center) that will "pave way for huge opportunities" (Financial Times).

Phones have swept through the African continent in the last decade, followed by WhatsApp, fiber, and mobile payment systems. As recently as 2000 Manuel Castells could call Africa "the black hole of the information society," but now the World Bank speaks of the "African digital renaissance," citing a proliferation of tech hubs and locally produced apps. The "Africa Rising" narrative focuses on the peaks of a complex terrain with many remarkable innovations and translations, while at the same time access is almost wholly owned by Mark Zuckerberg and a handful of telcos. In the valleys one government falsely tells its activist citizens that it has cracked WhatsApp's encryption, while another restricts the use of Skype, and around the continent mobile operators extract the most rent possible from their poorest customers, creating new forms of poverty. International funders preach development through entrepreneurship, teach tech innovation based on Silicon Valley models, and support mobile application development for "strengthening social inclusion." Inclusion, though, also means imbrication into a global financial information system that is better known for its shocks than its comforts, with new forms of micro-lending and mobile cash allowing neoliberal financialization of those at the "bottom of the pyramid" and in the most rural areas.

The Conference

The conference brings scholars, technologists, and cultural producers together on the island of Madeira: a European territory off the coast of Africa, a historical site of mutual entanglement between the Atlantic continents, and a point of departure for European expansion. Here we'll strategize ways to revisit, reframe, and recode the future of technology on and for the continent. What can African theorists, technologists, and cultural producers do to generate alternatives to the influx of neocolonial narratives of tech entrepreneurship? Taking as a given that Africa is "a variegated site of innovation" (Mavhunga), what are key epistemologies and ways of being which are endemic in Africa that should be offered to the world through new systems and processes? Technology is politics by other means (Latour), even if its agency is generally dissimulated. How, then, might we consider anew progressive social and political goals and their conjoining with cultures of technical creativity already embedded in Africa's diverse contexts of life? How might new strategic narratives nurture and promote a vision of the continent as a crucible for radical new socio-technical paradigms? How can an African information economy avoid the dynamics of the resource curse, where connectivity is extractive and exercised upon African citizens rather than by and through them? What can Western technologists do differently, and what are the spaces for collaboration? This conference aims to reinvestigate these relationships and engender dialog between African and Western audiences and participants, who should leave Madeira equipped with new strategies and new collaborative partnerships.

We are accepting papers, creative works, and technologies that explore or demonstrate alternative socio-technical strategies. Contributions should be grounded in analysis and move toward synthesis: We hope to paint the "art of the [radical] possible" and generate new threads and pathways for the development of fresh technologies. We hope that this focus on the possible near future will differentiate this event from many generative but more phantasmal Afro-futurist speculations. Creative works and technologies eligible for consideration may include, but are not limited to: software, technical systems ("low" or "hi"), images, objects, demos, film/video, poetry, performances, interventions, illustration, and more. Works will be selected by jury for an exhibition in Funchal, the capital city of Madeira, at the galleries of the Colégio dos Jesuitas, a re-purposed 16th century Jesuit compound.

Example themes include:

*Alternative globalist or transnational technologies

*African technical epistemologies

*Activist or political new media

*Re-coding remittances

*Technologies of migration and diaspora

*Technology and race

*Decolonizing ICT4D, Tech4D, and M4D

*Postcolonial computing

*Markets, math, and statistics of domination

*Histories of Africa and global production

*Non-western (or syncretic) applied science

*Anti-extractive technical and financial systems

*Artist's critical interventions into technology and technical practice

*Guidelines for Paper Submission*

Abstracts of 1,000 - 1,200 words will be accepted for review. These may include any additional materials, such as images or tables. The text of your abstract must be anonymized for double blind peer review. Each abstract will be read by at least three reviewers. After a period of three weeks, authors will be notified of rejection, acceptance, or request for revision. The ensuing abstract revision period will be three weeks.

Full papers must be no more than ten pages (2600 words), exclusive of notes and bibliography. Each paper will be read by at least three reviewers. After a period of three weeks, authors will be notified of acceptance or request for revision. This revision period will also be three weeks. Please use the Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition, for matters of style, capitalization, spelling, and hyphenation. Citations should be Chicago style [Notes and Bibliography]. The Manual can be found here: http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html.

Guidelines for Creative Work and Technology Submission

Creative Work and Tech Submission Deadline: May 12

We will accept works including (but not limited to) software, technical systems ("low" or "hi"), images, objects, demos, film/video, poetry, performances, interventions, illustration, and more. Submissions should include a description of the project of 500 words or fewer and this supplementary submission form, saved as PDF. As appropriate, your submission may include an additional PDF of images or plans, or a URL to a website or video (under 3 minutes) documentation. The text of your abstract or project description must be anonymized for double blind peer review. Each description will be read by at least three reviewers.

Note that the conference cannot offer funding to help produce projects or to transport them. We will have exhibition space and staff to assist with installation; the conference program will include exhibition tours and demonstration periods, and we will publish online documentation of the exhibitions.

Submission

Submissions will be done using the /Open Conference System. /You will need to create an account with this conference before submitting your materials.//Please follow this link to initiate the process:

http://snta.m-iti.org/index.php/snta/snta/user/account

The submission for both papers and creative works submission is May 12, 2017.

Contemporary Developments on Media, Culture and Society: Argentina and Latin America.

November 03 2017 | Universidad de San Andrés in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Deadline: May 15 2017

http://meso.com.ar/congreso-anual/

Updated: April 09 2017

The conference, organized by The Center for the Study of Media and Society in Argentina (MESO).

This will be the third annual conference organized by MESO on the interactions between media, culture and society. For more information about the 2015 and 2016 events, please visit http://meso.com.ar/congreso-anual/. This third annual conference is sponsored by the Center for Global Culture and Communication at Northwestern University.

Submissions should contribute to ongoing conversations about media, culture, and society in empirical, theoretical or methodological ways. They might also broaden our knowledge about the relationship between media, culture, and society at the national and regional level. Articles may refer to different aspects of communication, media, and cultural goods and services in the areas of journalism, entertainment -cinema, theater, television, music, etc. - advertising and marketing, public relations, social media, and video games, among others.

Topics to be addressed include the following, among others:

· Transformations in content production

· Change in the use of media

· Innovation and technological change

· Finance and media sustainability

· State, government and civil society

· Regulation and public policies

· Political communication and electoral campaigns

· The role of users as content producers

To make a submission:

· Send an extended abstract of the article, with a minimum length of 500 words and a maximum length of 1000 words (excluding title and references). The document should also include the contact information and brief (no more than 75 words) biography of each author.

· Abstracts should be sent without exception as an attached file, in word format (.doc, .docx), and entitled "Last Name, Name - Medios y Sociedad 2017".

· The deadline for submission is May 15, 2017. Abstracts should be sent by email to mediosysociedad@udesa.edu.ar . The subject of the mail should be "Last Name, Name - Medios y Sociedad 2017".

A selection committee will evaluate the abstracts and the results will be notified to the authors on July 1, 2017.

Please write to mediosysociedad@udesa.edu.ar if you have any questions and/or need any further information.

SLSA: Out of Time

November 09 2017 to November 12 2017 | Tempe, AZ

Deadline: May 15 2017

http://litsciarts.org/slsa17/

Updated: April 09 2017

Welcome to the human and inhuman deserts of Arizona.

Arizona State University will host the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts. ASU is located in Tempe Arizona, about fifteen minutes from the Phoenix Airport. The range of interdisciplinary labs and centers and the beautiful November weather make this an ideal locale for the conference.

The SLSA 2017 theme will be “Out of Time,” and papers/panels on all SLSA-related topics are welcome. Some of the areas related to the conference theme include: Nonhuman temporalities, Species extinction, Life after humans, slow time, the long now, Time and Computing, Digital Temporalities, Bio-political Time, Time and Capital, and much more. All proposal abstracts for roundtables, panel sessions, contributed papers, and posters must be submitted by Wednesday, May 15, 2017 (midnight EDT). See Submissions for more information and the full CFP.

Intersecting Processes New England Workshop on Science and Social Change

May 30 2017 | Old Fire Station, Woods Hole MA,

http://bit.ly/NewSSCa

Updated: April 09 2017

In this four-day workshop participants will create spaces, interactions, and support in formulating plans to extend our own projects of inquiry and engagement around "intersecting processes."

(*a limited number can participate from a distance via google+ hangout)

Taylor and García Barrios (1995; following Wolf 1982, 387 ) introduced the term to capture the ways that social and environmental change involves processes operating at different spatial and temporal scales and drawing on elements as diverse as the local climate and geo-morphology, social norms, work relations, and national political economic policy. Such intersecting processes are interlinked in the production of any outcome and in their own on-going transformation. An equivalent picture fits the changing structures we face in many areas, such as biomedicine and epidemiology, agriculture and ecological restoration, political economy and mental illness, science and social theory, project-based learning and fostering creativity. To understand such complexity requires our attention to the ways the intersecting processes transgress boundaries and restructure “internal” dynamics, thus ensuring that the situations do not have clearly defined boundaries and are not simply governed by coherent, internally driven dynamics. Engaging with such complexity invites agents to link "transversally" across different kinds of agents and scale, not to focus on one class or place or dynamic.

Activities during the workshop will, as they have at NewSSC since 2004, build on what the particular group of participants contribute and employ a range of tools and processes for "connecting, probing, and reflecting" so as to support and learn from each others' inquiries. The workshop format, in brief, includes an activity together as a group each morning and again for an hour at the end of the day. In between, time is spent in independent research related to the workshop topic, in conversations, and in other pursuits that participants find helpful for advancing our projects.

The intended outcomes include: a) products that reflect our inquiries and plans, conveyed in work-in-progress presentations (10-15 minutes) and revised in response to feedback so as to be shared outside the workshop, b) experiences that motivate us to take our individual projects beyond their current scope or level of activity, and c) stock-taking towards developing the workshop format. This year, with a view to assembling and distributing a collective product that can engage and influence wider audiences, the expectation of a shareable product is emphasized. In this spirit, travel subsidies will be guaranteed for participants who submit a draft working paper in advance and revise it by the end of the workshop.

Applications are sought from teachers, researchers, graduate students, and activists who are interested in facilitating discussion, reflection, avid learning, and clarifying one's identity and affinities in relation to the workshop topic. The workshop format allows for a limited number of participants over the internet. Newcomers and return participants are welcome.

Registration is on a sliding scale--$125 (for those with low incomes and lack of travel support) up to $300 (for those with a decent income and institutional/grant support). Registration covers meal costs, but not accommodation, which is at a local, moderately priced motel. The funding available to help get people to the workshop is modest, but we have managed to subsidize travel and accommodation in past years according to need (which favors graduate students and independent scholars). Online participant registration is on a sliding scale: $50 - $125. Some funding support may be supplied by The Pumping Station. For an extra charge, 1-3 graduate credits are available for workshop participation and completion of a related project.

Applications via the weblink. (Spaces still available as of 3/6/17) For more details, see http://sicw.wikispaces.com/newsscarrangements Participants should talk to the organizer or assistant before the workshop to explore ideas for developing projects making good use of the workshop format.

Organizer: Peter J. Taylor, University of Massachusetts Boston, Science in a Changing World graduate track, http://www.cct.umb.edu/sicw

Program Wikipages for participants (password-protected) Evaluations and reports (to be posted here after the workshop)

References Taylor, P. J. and R. García-Barrios (1995). "The social analysis of ecological change: From systems to intersecting processes." Social Science Information 34(1): 5-30. Wolf, E. (1982). Afterword. Europe and the People Without History. Berkeley, University of California Press: 385-391.

2017 international Summer School in Higher Education Research and Science Studies

October 09 2017 to October 13 2017 | University of Kassel, Germany

Deadline: June 16 2017

www.uni-kassel.de/go/summerschool2017

Updated: April 09 2017

The summer school "Boundaries in Science and Higher Education (Research)", organized by the International Centre for Higher Education Research Kassel (INCHER-Kassel).

Sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), the summer school aims at establishing a dialog among participants discussing, transcending and pushing forward the boundaries that cross science and higher education (research).

Please apply and – in case you would like to participate with a presentation or poster – submit an abstract (about one page) by June, 16th 2017 to summerschool@incher.uni-kassel.de. Letters of acceptance will be sent by July 3rd, 2017 as well as detailed information about the location, conference schedule and accommodation options.

Get the Picture. Digital Methods for Visual Research

June 26 2017 to July 11 2017 | University of Amsterdam

Deadline: May 05 2017

https://wiki.digitalmethods.net/Dmi/SummerSchool2017

Updated: March 10 2017

Gillian Rose employs the term visual methodologies for “researching with visual materials” (2016). Iconography, semiotics, framing analysis and multimodal analysis are among the approaches that may be applied to digital materials. One may also ask, does the online make a difference to the study of the visual? That is, with which approaches is the image considered primarily, or secondarily, as a digital object embedded in online media? Apart from the change in the setting of the object, there may also be methods that emerge from the new media, engines and platforms. What kinds of so-called ‘natively’ digital methods can be repurposed productively for visual analysis? How to make use of the Google’s reverse image search? More broadly, with the increasing focus on selfies and memes but also on Instagram stories, animated gifs, filters, stickers and emoticons, social media and digital communications are pushing for a visual turn in the study of digital culture. Such a push invites visual analysis into the realm of digital studies, too. One may begin to open the discussion of interplay by examining the new outputs such as journalists’ data visualisations as well as policy-makers’ dashboards like the open data city platforms.

One may similarly compare visual literacies. Are there new ways of interpreting images through data, both substantively (which are the related materials?) and temporally (how do they develop over time? do they resonate? are they memes?). In digital methods, the image is not only a research object but also a research device. Making images “that can be seen and manipulated” (Venturini, Jacomy & Pereira 2015) enables scholars to access and actively explore datasets. How to make them and read them? At the same time, the technical properties of digital images both in terms of their color, resolution, and timestamp, as well as their ‘networkedness’, traceability and resonance, become available for research, allowing one to think with images (as visual guides and narratives) as well as through them (as data objects). Novel visual methodologies then emerge.

There is the ‘active’ data visualisation, which includes research protocol diagrams, data dashboards, visual network analysis, and issue mapping. Protocol diagrams (Figure 1) guide analysts, programmers and designers through their collaborative research project. Data dashboards offer a visual aid for data metrics and analytics, in side-by-side graphs and tables; or become critical tools (as in the People’s Dashboard ). Visual network analysis offers a way into data that can be engaged with and requires an active research attitude (Venturini, Jacomy & Pereira 2015). Issue mapping renders legible the actors and substance of a (possibly controversial) issue (Rogers, Sánchez-Querubín & Kil 2015). In a second group of approaches, the image is treated as a digitised or natively digital object of study. This includes visual and cultural analytics, which provide distant visual reading techniques to explore and plot visual objects such as selfies and websites based on their formal properties (Manovich 2014; Ben-David, Amram & Bekkerman 2016). Networked visual content analysis, in which images may be queried ‘in reverse’ to study their circulation, can be used to critically assess questions of representation and cultural standing (Figure 2). Another group of approaches repurpose visual formats, where more playful explorations appropriate (and tweak) the templates and visual aesthetics of the web, creating research GIFs and critical social media profiles (Figure 3). In this 10th Digital Methods Summer School we will explore and expand such digital methods for visual research, and critically inquire into their proposed epistemologies. We look forward to welcoming you to Amsterdam in the Summertime! Summer School Philosophy The Digital Methods Summer School is exploratory and experimental.

It is not a setting for ‘just’ tool training or for principally tool-driven research. Substantive research projects are conceived and carried out. Participants are encouraged to ‘span time with their issue’ and the materials. In other words, we heed Alexander Galloway’s admonition about data and tool-driven work: “Those who were formerly scholars or experts in a certain area are now recast as mere tool users beholden to the affordances of the tool — while students spend ever more time mastering menus and buttons, becoming literate in a digital device rather than a literary corpus” (Galloway 2014:127). We encourage device and corpus literacy! The device training we ask you to do prior to the Summer School through online tutorials, and at the Summer School itself, in a kind of flipped learning environment (if you'll excuse the overused phrase), we would like to believe that you have familiarised yourself already with the tools and completed the tutorials available online. During the Summer School we will discuss and tinker with the nitty-gritty, aim to invent new methods, techniques and heuristics and create the first iterations of compelling work to be shared. About Digital Methods as a Concept Digital methods is a term coined as a counterpoint to virtual methods, which typically digitize existing methods and port them onto the Web. Digital methods, contrariwise, seek to learn from the methods built into the dominant devices online, and repurpose them for social and cultural research.

That is, the challenge is to study both the info-web as well as the social web with the tools that organize them. There is a general protocol to digital methods. At the outset stock is taken of the natively digital objects that are available (links, tags, threads, etc.) and how devices such as search engines make use of them. Can the device techniques be repurposed, for example by remixing the digital objects they take as inputs? Once findings are made with online data, where to ground them? Is the baseline still the offline, or are findings to be grounded in more online data? Taking up these questions more theoretically (but also practically) there is also a Digital Methods book (MIT Press, 2013) as well as a complementary Issue Mapping book (Amsterdam University Press, 2015), and other digital methods publications .

Intersecting Processes

May 27 2017 to May 30 2017 | Old Fire Station, Woods Hole MA

Deadline: March 31 2017

http://bit.ly/NewSSCa

Updated: March 10 2017

New England Workshop on Science and Social Change
(*a limited number can participate from a distance via google+ hangout)

In this four-day workshop participants will create spaces, interactions, and support in formulating plans to extend our own projects of inquiry and engagement around "intersecting processes." Taylor and García Barrios (1995; following Wolf 1982, 387 ) introduced the term to capture the ways that social and environmental change involves processes operating at different spatial and temporal scales and drawing on elements as diverse as the local climate and geo-morphology, social norms, work relations, and national political economic policy. Such intersecting processes are interlinked in the production of any outcome and in their own on-going transformation. An equivalent picture fits the changing structures we face in many areas, such as biomedicine and epidemiology, agriculture and ecological restoration, political economy and mental illness, science and social theory, project-based learning and fostering creativity. To understand such complexity requires our attention to the ways the intersecting processes transgress boundaries and restructure “internal” dynamics, thus ensuring that the situations do not have clearly defined boundaries and are not simply governed by coherent, internally driven dynamics. Engaging with such complexity invites agents to link "transversally" across different kinds of agents and scale, not to focus on one class or place or dynamic.

Activities during the workshop will, as they have at NewSSC since 2004, build on what the particular group of participants contribute and employ a range of tools and processes for "connecting, probing, and reflecting" so as to support and learn from each others' inquiries. The workshop format, in brief, includes an activity together as a group each morning and again for an hour at the end of the day. In between, time is spent in independent research related to the workshop topic, in conversations, and in other pursuits that participants find helpful for advancing our projects. The intended outcomes include: a) products that reflect our inquiries and plans, conveyed in work-in-progress presentations (10-15 minutes) and revised in response to feedback so as to be shared outside the workshop, b) experiences that motivate us to take our individual projects beyond their current scope or level of activity, and c) stock-taking towards developing the workshop format. This year, with a view to assembling and distributing a collective product that can engage and influence wider audiences, the expectation of a shareable product is emphasized. In this spirit, travel subsidies will be guaranteed for participants who submit a draft working paper in advance and revise it by the end of the workshop. Applications are sought from teachers, researchers, graduate students, and activists who are interested in facilitating discussion, reflection, avid learning, and clarifying one's identity and affinities in relation to the workshop topic. The workshop format allows for a limited number of participants over the internet. Newcomers and return participants are welcome.

Registration is on a sliding scale--$125 (for those with low incomes and lack of travel support) up to $300 (for those with a decent income and institutional/grant support). Registration covers meal costs, but not accommodation, which is at a local, moderately priced motel. The funding available to help get people to the workshop is modest, but we have managed to subsidize travel and accommodation in past years according to need (which favors graduate students and independent scholars). Online participant registration is on a sliding scale: $50 - $125. Some funding support may be supplied by The Pumping Station. For an extra charge, 1-3 graduate credits are available for workshop participation and completion of a related project.

Applications via http://bit.ly/NewSSCa (Spaces still available as of 3/6/17) For more details, see http://sicw.wikispaces.com/newsscarrangements Participants should talk to the organizer or assistant before the workshop to explore ideas for developing projects making good use of the workshop format. Organizer: Peter J. Taylor, University of Massachusetts Boston, Science in a Changing World graduate track, http://www.cct.umb.edu/sicw

Doctoral School of Social Studies of Science and Technology in Latin America

September 18 2017 to September 20 2017 | Universidad Nacional de Colombia

Deadline: September 18 2017

http://www.esocite.la/escuela/bogota2017

Updated: March 10 2017

En la Facutad de Ciencias Humanas de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, tendrá lugar entre el 19-21 de septiembre de 2017, el VIII Taller Latinoamericano de Jóvenes Investigadores en Ciencia, Tecnología y Sociedad, y la V Escuela Doctoral de Estudios Sociales y Políticos sobre la Ciencia y la Tecnología de ESOCITE (la Sociedad Latinoamericana en Estudios Sociales de la Ciencia y la Tecnología), en la que se buscará reunir a un colectivo de jóvenes investigadores e investigadoras (alrededor de 30) en fase avanzada de redacción de sus tesis, con sus directores de tesis e investigadores consolidados del campo disciplinar, con el objeto de debatir las preguntas y los diseños de investigación así como las metodologías aplicadas, los avances que ya han realizado en sus investigaciones y sus aportes al campo CTS y a las sociedades de la Región. Se pretende que los jóvenes tengan un espacio privilegiado en la formación de una comunidad científica, compartido con investigadores consolidados, con mayor trayectoria en el campo de los estudios sociales y políticos de la ciencia y la tecnología en el espacio iberoamericano. De manera especial, se espera poder incidir en la potenciación de las redes de conocimiento entre los investigadores y las instituciones públicas y privadas de I+D+I de la región, enfatizando la inserción y fortalecimiento de la Red CTS-Colombia en el campo disciplinar en la Región. Para esta convocatoria se considerará como jóvenes investigadores e investigadoras a estudiantes de doctorado avanzados de todos los países de América Latina (se aceptará a 25 como máximo) y a estudiantes de maestría avanzados de instituciones colombianas (se aceptará a cinco como máximo). El encuentro cuenta con el auspicio del Grupo de Trabajo CLACSO “Ciencia y sociedad: los usos sociales del conocimiento en América Latina y la inclusión social”. A continuación del Taller/Escuela la Facultad de Ciencias Humanas de la UNC realizará, en la misma sede, el II Coloquio Nacional ESOCITE con la participación de destacados académicos, al cual están todos los asistentes y participantes cordialmente invitados. La asistencia a este coloquio no tiene costo, pero el alojamiento y manutención correrá por cuenta de los interesados.
Comité Científico
Dra. Rosalba Casas, IIS-UNAM (México); Dr. Jorge Gibert, Universidad de Valparaíso, (Chile); Dr. Yuri Jack Gómez, Universidad Nacional (Colombia), Dr. Pablo Kreimer, Universidad Maimónides, (Argentina), Dra. Tania Pérez-Bustos, Universidad Nacional, (Colombia), Dra. Olga Restrepo, Universidad Nacional (Colombia), Dr. Ronny Viales, Universidad de Costa Rica; Dr. Irlan Von Linsingen, Universidad Federal de Santa Catarina, (Brasil).

The World Congress of Sociology

July 15 2017 to July 21 2017 | Toronto, Canada

Deadline: March 15 2017

http://www.isa-sociology.org/en/conferences/world-congress/toronto- 2018/guidelines-for-program-coordinators/

Updated: March 10 2017

RC 23 (Sociology of Science and Technology) encourages you to organize a session at the upcoming World Congress. All topics relevant to the sociology of science and technology are appropriate. However, given the restricted number of session slots allocated to the RC, organizers are encouraged to avoid excessively narrow topics. To facilitate inclusion of as many individuals as possible, the Co-coordinators intend to include a variety of session formats. For additional details on potential session formats.

How online media are changing science communication

Deadline: May 01 2017

mc.manuscriptcentral.com/sc.

Updated: December 08 2016

Call for papers for a special issue of Science Communication Public science in a wired world
Guest Editors: Sarah R Davies (University of Copenhagen), Joachim Allgaier (Alpen-Adria University Klagenfurt), and Noriko Hara (Indiana University).

Science communication – public dissemination and debate of scientific knowledge – is increasingly taking place online. From the websites of scientific organizations such as universities or scholarly societies to social media platforms such as YouTube, Facebook groups or Reddit, science is negotiated by public audiences in online spaces alongside traditional formats such as the mass media, public lectures, or popular science writing. Social research is starting to engage with these spaces and tools, and to understand how science communication is produced and consumed in digital and social media. Recent work has, for example, explored how authority is negotiated in science blogs (Riesch & Mendel 2013), what kind of science is presented online (Brossard 2013), how Twitter is used to engage with scientific projects (Gastrow 2015; Kahle et al 2016), or how blogging is used to manage scientific identity (Steinke 2013). As of yet, however, there has been no dedicated volume or special issue devoted to science communication in digital and social media, and this emergent body of research remains dispersed. This special issue will showcase cutting edge research in online science communication and thereby consolidate and draw together this emerging field.

Potential focus areas for papers (which may use any recognized systematic methodological approach, whether qualitative or quantitative) might include (but are not limited to):

* Science videos on YouTube, TED or other platforms; * Science as a social media phenomenon (such as Facebook pages or science on Twitter); * Science blogging by scientists or non-scientists; * University websites and online branding activities; * The role of science journalism in an online era; * Online public information campaigns (such as Science: It’s a Girl Thing!); * Discussion forums and online dialogue and debate by scientists or non-scientists.

We welcome papers that interrogate these developments by critically exploring, for instance, how online media are affecting scientific authority, the visions of science that are being constructed through online communication, the reception and interpretation of science online, or how online science communication is managed, produced and/or misused.

Full papers are due May 1, 2017, for publication likely in late 2017 or early 2018. Earlier submissions are very strongly encouraged. Mention the special issue in your cover letter. Late papers may be considered if extra space is available. Papers should follow the Science Communication guidelines for length and format; submit at mc.manuscriptcentral.com/sc. Our ideal manuscript is between 7,000 and 9,000 words, inclusive of notes, references, and other material. Additional guidelines can be found at scx.sagepub.com. Queries regarding the special issue can be addressed to the guest editors (Sarah Davies, Joachim Allgaier, and Noriko Hara; contact at srdavies@hum.ku.dk) or to the journal’s editor, Susanna Priest, at editorscicom@gmail.com.

References Brossard D (2013) New media landscapes and the science information consumer. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 110(Supplement 3): 14096–14101. Gastrow M (2015) Science and the Social Media in an African Context The Case of the Square Kilometre Array Telescope. Science Communication 37(6): 703–722. Kahle K, Sharon AJ and Baram-Tsabari A (2016) Footprints of Fascination: Digital Traces of Public Engagement with Particle Physics on CERN’s Social Media Platforms. PLOS ONE 11(5): e0156409. Riesch H and Mendel J (2013) Science Blogging: Networks, Boundaries and Limitations. Science as Culture 23(1): 51–72. Steinke J (2013) In Her Own Voice: Identity Centrality and Perceptions of Workplace Climate in Blogs by Women Scientists. International Journal of Gender, Science and Technology 5(1): 25–51.

8th Tensions of Europe Conference

September 07 2017 to September 10 2017 | Athens

Deadline: February 15 2017

http://8toe2017.phs.uoa.gr

Updated: December 08 2016

2nd Call for Papers: Borders and Technology. The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference will have as its main theme the history of borders and technology. We invite papers studying the history of the relationship between national borders and transnational infrastructures, hidden technological linking and delinking that reinforced or challenged border delineations and demarcations, the relationship between borders and technologically-induced environmental crises and disasters, the virtualization of borders and the territories that they contain through the use of electronic and related technologies, geopolitics and technology, the redefinition of borders due to the use of technology (and vice versa), all the way from the production to the circulation and use of goods and commodities. One central aim is to cross-fertilize between disciplines and we therefore invite contributions from a wide variety of historical disciplines as well as from fields like Migration and Border Studies, Migration History, Mobility History, etc, especially in connection to borders and migrations from, to and within Europe.

Themes that fall under the general agenda of the Tensions of Europe network are very welcomed (e.g. transnational histories of technology, history of European infrastructures and networks, environment and technology, the democracy-technology relationship, conflicting interests and technology, technology and hidden integration, technology and culture, gender and technology, technology and ethnicity, technology and disability).

Tensions of Europe has a long tradition of fostering alternative meeting formats. We encourage proposals for non-traditional sessions with different formats and new ideas (e.g. round tables, agenda-building sessions, brainstorm sessions, break-out groups with assignments, poster discussion, film discussion, event-based sessions). As long as quality can be demonstrated, the program committee will not prioritize between formats. By quality we mean suggestions that promise constructive, stimulating and engaging discussion.

Techniques of the Corporation

May 04 2017 to May 07 2017 | University of Toronto Technoscience Research Unit

Deadline: January 13 2017

Updated: November 10 2016

Conference organization Justin Douglas, Bretton Fosbrook, Kira Lussier, Michelle Murphy

How do corporations know themselves and their world? Over the last 150 years, corporations, like universities and laboratories, have generated an abundance of knowledge-making techniques in the form of psychological tests, efficiency technologies, scenario planning, and logistical systems. As dominant forms of the last century, corporations are assembled with instruments, infrastructures, and interventions that arrange and rearrange the dynamics of capitalism. These techniques of the corporation have filtered into our daily lives, influencing everyday understandings of self, inequality, environment, and society.

Techniques of the Corporation will assemble an interdisciplinary network of established and emerging scholars whose work contributes to the critical study of the techniques, epistemologies, and imaginaries of the 20th-century corporation. This conference aims to foster a timely conversation between Science and Technology Studies (STS) approaches and the recent histories of capitalism. We treat the corporation in the same way that historians of science and STS scholars have approached science, colonialism, and militarism as generative sites for knowledge production, value-making, and technopolitics. The conference takes as its starting place North American corporations with the understanding that corporations are multinational forms with complex transnational histories. Building from the recent history of capitalism, we attend to the entangled genealogies of corporations with slavery, exploitation, environmental destruction, colonialism, and inequality.

Hosted by the Technoscience Research Unit at the University of Toronto, this event will be an intimate multi-day conversation between established and emerging scholars in the fields of STS, history of science, and the history of capitalism. Techniques of the Corporation will be headlined by keynote speaker Joseph Dumit, and features invited talks by Dan Bouk, Elspeth Brown, Deborah Cowen, Orit Halpern, Louis Hyman, Michelle Murphy, Martha Poon, and Elise Thorburn. The conference will be an immersive experience in the Greater Toronto Area with meals and cocktails provided.

We invite emerging and established scholars in diverse fields (including business history; labour history; anthropology; geography; economic sociology; media studies; critical race studies; architecture studies; feminist and sexuality studies; environmental studies; and cultural studies) to explore the techniques, epistemologies, and imaginaries of corporations. Our overall goal is to crystallize a new field, culminating in a field-defining publication. We welcome work on corporate practices that exceed calculative logics, such as work on social relations, affective and psychological states, and speculative futurities. In addition to traditional papers, the conference encourages creative methods to query corporate forms, including art installations, videos, interactive multimedia projects, and role-playing games. Applications for travel assistance will be arranged after acceptance.


Corporate practices, include, but are not limited to:
management. sharing economy, data management, marketing, risk management, corporate culture. planning, corporate responsibility, consulting, infrastructure, sustainability, research and development, logistics, corporate design,
intellectual property, gaming, precarity, affective labor, racial surveillance, architecture,transnational capital,
Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words and a CV to the conference organizers at corporatetechniques@gmail.com by 13 January 2017.

FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON THE HISTORY OF RECENT SOCIAL SCIENCE

June 09 2017 to June 10 2017 | Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Deadline: February 03 2017

www.hisress.org

Updated: October 07 2016

This two-day conference of the Society for the History of Recent Social Science (HISRESS) will bring together researchers working on the history of post-World War II social science. It will provide a forum for the latest research on the cross-disciplinary history of the post-war social sciences, including but not limited to anthropology, economics, psychology, political science, and sociology as well as related fields like area studies, communication studies, history, international relations, law and linguistics. We are especially eager to receive submissions that treat themes, topics, and events that span the history of individual disciplines.

The conference aims to build upon the recent emergence of work and conversation on cross-disciplinary themes in the postwar history of the social sciences. A number of monographs, edited collections, special journal issues, and gatherings at the École normale supérieure de Cachan, Duke University, Harvard University, the London School of Economics, New York University, the University of Toronto and elsewhere testify to a growing interest in the developments spanning the social sciences in the early, late, and post-Cold War periods. Most history of social science scholarship, however, remains focused on the 19th and early 20th centuries, and attuned to the histories of individual disciplines. Though each of the major social science fields now has a community of disciplinary historians, research explicitly concerned with cross-disciplinary topics remains comparatively rare. The purpose of the conference is to further encourage the limited but fruitful cross-disciplinary conversations of recent years.

Submissions are welcome in areas such as:

- The uptake of social science concepts and figures in wider intellectual and popular discourses - Comparative institutional histories of departments and programs - Border disputes and boundary work between disciplines as well as academic cultures - Themes and concepts developed in the history and sociology of natural and physical science, reconceptualized for the social science context - Professional and applied training programs and schools, and the quasi-disciplinary fields (like business administration) that typically housed them - The role of social science in post-colonial state-building governance - Social science adaptations to the changing media landscape - The role and prominence of disciplinary memory in a comparative context

The two-day conference, hosted by the Erasmus Institute for Public Knowledge in collaboration with the Erasmus School of History, Culture and Communication and the Faculty of Social Sciences at Erasmus University Rotterdam, will be organized as a series of one-hour, single-paper sessions attended by all participants. Ample time will be set aside for intellectual exchange between presenters and attendees, as all participants are expected to read pre-circulated papers in advance. Proposals should contain no more than 1000 words, indicating the originality of the paper. The deadline for receipt of abstracts is February 3, 2017. Final notification will be given in early March 2017 after proposals have been reviewed. Completed papers will be expected by May 15, 2017.

The organizing committee consists of

Jamie Cohen-Cole (George Washington University), Bregje van Eekelen (executive organizer, Erasmus University Rotterdam), Philippe Fontaine (École normale supérieure de Cachan), and Jeff Pooley (Muhlenberg College)

All proposals and requests for information should be sent to: hisress2017@gmail.com. For more information on the Society for the History of Recent Social Science (HISRESS), see the website.

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Urban Infrastructure History and the Social Sciences

May 30 2017 to June 01 2017 | NYU Paris

Deadline: September 01 2016

Updated: September 15 2016

Recent work in history, anthropology, science and technology studies, geography, resilience/sustainability and other disciplines has explored the multiple social effects of infrastructure. Studies of electric power networks, aqueducts, roads and waste disposal systems have examined not only the provision of services to urban residents, but also distributions of political power, the organization of capital, contentious claims by and about labor, and environmental and distributional inequalities. Social histories and ethnographies of public and private infrastructure have demonstrated that infrastructures reshape the lives of their users even as urban residents fight to reshape it to their own ends. This work has revealed both the material grounding of urban social relations and the social life of material infrastructure. Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the History and Social Life of Urban Infrastructure seeks to extend and expand this work.

The conference will bring together humanists, social scientists, and those from other disciplines studying urban infrastructure’s past, present, and future. The symposium aims to allow examination of questions including: 1. How should we understand the role of infrastructural networks in the historical development and daily social life of cities? 2. How has the development of infrastructure shaped the expectations of urban citizenship? What happens when these expectations go unrealized? 3. How should we understand the ways in which infrastructure produces or diminishes urban space and power relations? 4. What is the relationship between infrastructure and the organization of urban political power, including issues of citizenship, governmentality, and claims of rights to the city? 5. How have the resource allocations of urban infrastructure reshaped the non-human world, both within and beyond the city? 6. How has infrastructure developed differently in cities under colonial, post-colonial, socialist, Keynesian, and neo-liberal governing regimes? 7. What is the role of urban infrastructure in shaping community and supporting resilience, and how has this role emerged and evolved over time? In order to allow comparison of methodologies for the study of infrastructure, the conference aims to include scholars employing ethnographic, quantitative, and archival approaches. To enable comparison across time and place, the organizers hope to include scholars working on cities in Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas. We welcome submissions examining both modern and early modern eras.

The symposium will be held at NYU Paris May 31-June 1, 2017, co-sponsored by the NYU Department of History, the Department of Technology, Culture, and Society at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, and NYU Shanghai and funded by a grant from the NYU Provost’s Global Initiatives. The conference papers and presentations will be in English. The conference will be limited to a maximum of thirty papers, limited to ten double-spaced pages. Papers will be due by April 1, 2017 and pre-circulated, with a short oral presentation by the author, followed by two commentators and discussion on the floor. Those interested in presenting should submit abstracts of no more than 250 words by September 1, 2016 and will be selected by the organizing committee. Abstracts should be sent to Krysta Battersby, Project Manager, Department of Technology, Culture and Society, NYU Tandon School of Engineering Infrastructureconference2017@nyu.edu.

Rust/Resistance: Works of Recovery

June 20 2017 to June 24 2017 | Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan

Deadline: February 15 2017

http://asle2017.clas.wayne.edu

Updated: September 15 2016

2017 Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (ASLE) Biennial Conference

In Rust: The Longest War, Jonathan Waldman claims that, for those who “yield to rust, find beauty in rust, capitalize on rust, raise awareness of rust, and teach about rust, work is riddled with scams, lawsuits, turf battles, and unwelcome oversight. Explosions, collisions, arrests, threats, and insults abound.” Rust is the underside of cosmopolis. Rust belts follow industry and its corrosions; the parasitic Rust fungi are enemies of agriculture. And yet there is an irenic side to rust: it inspires contemplation, the search for beauty, and the effort to defend what is threatened. As an agent of time, rust sponsors stories of collapse-and-recovery, evolution-and-extinction, but it also questions them. Narratives of progress that see rust as the enemy are not universal. In Japanese aesthetics, for instance, sabi is the beauty of natural aging and aged materials; what is new is not as lovely as what has weathered. In a time obsessed by environmental apocalypse, rust may reveal other trajectories for cultures of recovery.

Resurget Cineribus, “It Will Rise from the Ashes,” is the motto of Detroit—our host city. Long associated with steel, car culture, and the music of Motown, Detroit is also a site of struggle for racial and environmental justice, against depopulation and “ruin porn,” and for the preservation of artistic heritage. A nexus of encounters between indigenous nations and the French fur trade, it became a locus of the Great Migration, “white flight,” and gentrification. Water-rich on the strait between Lake Huron and Lake Erie, Detroit and its neighbors struggle against corroded infrastructure and government corruption. For all those reasons, Detroit is an ideal place to confer about rust, resistance, and recovery. We invite participants to interpret the conference theme as broadly as possible and to imagine their work in terms of content and form. We particularly encourage non-traditional modes of presentation, including hybrid, performative and collaborative works; panels that minimize formal presentation in favor of engaged emergent discussion; interdisciplinary approaches; environmentally inflected readings of fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, film, theatre and other media; and proposals from outside the academic humanities, including submissions from artists, writers, teachers, practitioners, activists and colleagues in the social and natural sciences.

Proposals must be submitted online at https://asle.submittable.com/submit All proposals must be submitted by December 12, 2016. We will evaluate your proposal carefully and notify you of its final status by February 15, 2017. If you are a panel organizer and would like a panel CFP posted to the ASLE website, please use the online submission form here: http://www.asle.org/panel-calls-for-papers/. Note: you must be or become a member of ASLE by the time of registration to present at the conference. Join or check your membership status at http://www.asle.org/. Read full CFP here:http://www.asle.org/wp-content/uploads/ASLE-2017-CFP.pdf

The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference

September 07 2017 to September 10 2017 | Athens

Deadline: February 15 2017

http://8toe2017.phs.uoa.gr/

Updated: May 10 2016

Borders and Technology

The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference will have as its main theme the history of borders and technology. We invite papers studying the history of the relationship between national borders and transnational infrastructures, hidden technological linking and delinking that reinforced or challenged border delineations and demarcations, the relationship between borders and technologically-induced environmental crises and disasters, the virtualization of borders and the territories that they contain through the use of electronic and related technologies, geopolitics and technology, the redefinition of borders due to the use of technology (and vice versa), all the way from the production to the circulation and use of goods and commodities. One central aim is to cross-fertilize between disciplines and we therefore invite contributions from a wide variety of historical disciplines as well as from fields like Migration and Border Studies, Migration History, Mobility History, etc, especially in connection to borders and migrations from, to and within Europe.

Themes that fall under the general agenda of the Tensions of Europe network are very welcomed (e.g. transnational histories of technology, history of European infrastructures and networks, environment and technology, the democracy-technology relationship, conflicting interests and technology, technology and hidden integration, technology and culture, gender and technology, technology and ethnicity, technology and disability).

Tensions of Europe has a long tradition of fostering alternative meeting formats. We encourage proposals for non-traditional sessions with different formats and new ideas (e.g. round tables, agenda-building sessions, brainstorm sessions, break-out groups with assignments, poster discussion, film discussion, event-based sessions). As long as quality can be demonstrated, the program committee will not prioritize between formats. By quality we mean suggestions that promise constructive, stimulating and engaging discussion.

We invite scholars from all relevant fields to submit proposal to the website.
by 15 February 2017

All proposals should include a title, short abstract, the academic title and affiliation of the applicant(s) and a short bio. Please name your file with your surname. Abstracts for individual papers and posters should be no more than 300 words. For panels, we ask for a description of the theme of the panel (max 300 words) together with shorter abstracts (max 150 words) of the individual papers. If you wish to suggest a presentation of a different format, please use these word limits as guidelines. We will inform applicants by April 1st 2017 whether their contribution has been accepted. A second call for papers with information about keynote speakers will be distributed by the end of 2016. Conference website: http://8toe2017.phs.uoa.gr/

Welcome to Athens in September 2017!

Aristotle Tympas (Chair of the Organizing Committee)

Division of History of Science and Technology Department of Philosophy and History of Science School of Science National and Kapodistrian University of Athens

The Tensions of Europe conference is organized biennially. Tensions of Europe is an interdisciplinary community of scholars who study the shaping of Europe by paying attention to the role of technology and material culture. It welcomes fruitful interaction between historians of technology and scholars who study technology from all other fields of the humanities and the social sciences (http://www.tensionsofeurope.eu). The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference will be co-organized by the Division of History of Science and Technology, Department of Philosophy and History of Science, School of Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (http://www.phs.uoa.gr/hst/) and the Foundation for the History of Technology (http://www.histech.nl/www/en/), which is hosted by the Eindhoven University of Technology.

Institute for Advanced Studies

October 01 2016 to June 30 2017 | Graz, Austria

Deadline: December 31 2015

http://www.ias-sts.aau.at

Updated: November 06 2015

The IAS-STS in Graz, Austria, promotes the interdisciplinary investigation of the links and interactions between science, tech- nology and society, as well as technology assessment and research into the development and implementation of socially and

environmentally sound technologies. Broadly speaking, the IAS-STS is an institute for the enhancement of science, techno- logy and society studies. The IAS-STS invites researchers to apply for a stay between 1 October 2016 and 30 June 2017 as a

• Research Fellow (up to nine months); or, • Visiting Scholar (shorter period, e.g. a month).

The IAS-STS offers excellent research infrastructure. Close co-operation with researchers at the IFZ (Inter-University

Research Centre for Technology, Work and Culture), and the Graz unit of STS (Institute of Science, Technology and Society

Studies, Klagenfurt University), guest lectures, colloquia, workshops, and conferences provide an atmosphere of creativity

and scholarly discussion. Furthermore, we can offer five grants, worth EUR 940,- per month, for long-term Research Fellows

at the IAS-STS.

The Fellowship Programme 2016-2017 is dedicated to projects investigating the following issues:

1. Gender – Technology – Environment

This area of research particularly focuses on gender and queer dimensions in science and technology. On the one hand, individual

perspectives of actors in the technological field are taken into account; on the other hand, educational, organisational, societal, envi- ronmental, and political issues (e.g. queer ecology or environmental justice) are gaining more and more relevance. Queer perspectives

on STS are of special interest, including analyses of the reproduction of sexual binaries or reproductions of marginalized/hegemonic

positions and normalizations in and through science and technologies.

2. Life Sciences/Biotechnology

Applications are sought in two thematic areas: First, following some 20 years of public debate, agricultural biotechnology continues to be a

deeply controversial issue in the EU, partly fueled by progress in science and technology innovation such as GM industrial and energy crops,

or novel breeding techniques. Research should contribute to a better understanding of the regulatory, broader policy and governance

challenges of agricultural biotechnology, and/or explore strategies to manage these challenges. Second, in recent years, social studies of

the life sciences were bound to large scale research programmes. In many countries, these funding schemes have now come to an end.

This is an opportunity to review these previous programmes via collaborative engagement with the life sciences, as well as to explore new

ways of inquiry. Applicants are encouraged to address these issues when analysing the life sciences as a social process.

3. Sustainable and Innovative Public Procurement & Ecodesign

The supply side policy “Ecodesign”, and the demand side policy “Public Procurement” are used to support the transition towards

green, socially responsible and innovative markets. Nonetheless, scientific research in these respective fields is still limited. Re- searchers investigating the following areas are encouraged to apply: The environmental impact or the innovation potential of green

public procurement and “Ecodesign”; the impact of socially responsible public procurement; the hurdles, success factors, efficacy,

and wider implications of European or national policies for sustainable and innovative public procurement and “Ecodesign”.

4. Towards Low-Carbon Energy Systems

Based on analyses of social, technological and organisational frameworks of energy use, projects should contribute to the shaping

of sustainable energy, climate and technology policies. They should focus on socio-economic aspects of energy technologies or on

strategies of environmental technology policy. They should develop measures and strategies for the promotion of renewable energy

sources; for the transition to a sustainable energy system; or, contribute to the field of sustainable construction. Regional governance,

climate policy strategies, innovation policy, participation and the role of users are important themes. In addition, the Manfred Heindler

grant is awarded to research projects concerning the increased use of renewable energies and the more efficient use of energy.

5. Sustainable Food Systems

Food security, nutrition, food quality and safety, resource scarcity, carbon foot prints and other challenges faced in urban or rural

areas are currently dominating the industrialized and globalized food systems. Research applications exploring different forms of

sustainable food systems, as well as related social practices and socioeconomic/technical processes in the production, distribution,

marketing, and consumption of food are encouraged. A particular focus lies on governance mechanisms, policies, and their (potential)

contribution to a wider transformation towards more sustainable cities, regions and societies.

Applications must be submitted to the IAS-STS by 31 December 2015.

For application forms and further information:

Please visit our website: www.ias-sts.aau.at

Institute for Advanced Studies on Science, Technology and Society (IAS-STS)

Attn. Günter Getzinger • Kopernikusgasse 9 • 8010 Graz • Austria • E-mail: ias-sts@aau.at