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Society for Social Studies of Science

The STS Profession

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Events

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Submitting items to 4S and Technoscience Updates

Please email items for the 4S “Profession” pages and the Technoscience Updates newsletter to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Items may be edited for length. Please include a URL for the complete and authoritative information.

The monthly deadline for inclusion in the newsletter is the 15th.

Events

Events include paper calls for conferences, workshops, lectures, seminars, and exhibits (listed in chronological order).

Royal Musical Association Study Day: Identity and Vinyl Culture

November 18 2017 | University of Birmingham Keynote

Updated: September 17 2017

The Department of Music at the University of Birmingham is delighted to host a Royal Musical Association Study Day. We welcome postgraduate researchers and practitioners from all areas of music to present their work in an inclusive, accessible and supportive space. We welcome submissions that engage with the study day theme of “Identity and Vinyl Culture”. The resurgence of vinyl records in a multi-format, multi-channel listening world raises fundamental questions around the development of music technology, accessibility and the social practice of listening. Topics of relevance to the study day theme might include, but are not restricted to:

 Articulations of identity (gender, sexuality, ethnicity, class, etc.) through vinyl culture  Vinyl as anti-hegemonic practice  Under-representation and marginality in vinyl culture  Authenticity and vinyl  Sound formats and accessibility We welcome both traditional and innovative formats for presentations relating to any areas of musical research, including composition, audio-visual media, performance, and/or other creative practices.

Presentations should be 20 minutes in length, and will be followed by an additional 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Submission guidelines Potential contributors are invited to submit abstracts of up to 300 words and a short bio to Karlyn King at kxk628@student.bham.ac.uk. Emails should include your name, email address, affiliation, and the title of your presentation. Please make any particular space, format, or equipment requirements clear in addition to your abstract. It is hoped that we may be able to offer a contribution towards as many non-funded postgraduate student travel expenses as possible.

The STS Conference Graz 2018

May 07 2018 to May 08 2018 | HOTEL WEITZER, Graz

Deadline: October 31 2017

http://www.sts-conference-graz.aau.at

Updated: September 17 2017

The STS Conference Graz 2018 is the joint Annual Conference of the Institute of Science, Technology and Society Studies at Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt|Wien|Graz (STS), the Inter-University Research Centre for Technology, Work and Culture (IFZ) and the Institute for Advanced Studies on Science, Technology and Society (IAS-STS).

In our Call for Sessions we suggest the following thematic fields (Gender-Technology-Environment, Digitalization of Society, Life Sciences/Biotechnology, Sustainable and Innovative Public Procurement & Ecodesign, Towards Low-Carbon Energy and Mobility Systems, Sustainable Food Systems) and we would like to encourage participants to think outside the box by combining thematic fields and considering intersections: http://www.sts-conference-graz.aau.at.

Sessions do not need to be limited to academic paper presentations. We encourage you to suggest interactive and innovative session formats too, such as discussion groups, slow talks, etc.

Please let us know in case you plan an alternative setting by briefly describing it.



For submitting your session abstract, please use this online form and send an abstract (max. 500 words) no later than October 31, 2017.



Second Colombia National Colloquium in STS: MAKING PEACE IN A POST-TRUTH WORLD

September 21 2017 to September 23 2017 | National University of Colombia, Bogotá

Updated: September 17 2017

Social studies of science and technology (STS) through the study of the co-production of contemporary technoscience and its hybrids can and should contribute to the construction of a reflexive and inclusive society. The question as to how technoscience and society co-produce themselves in multiple ways, in different places, following matters of public interest that assemble heterogeneous actors, has broadened the scope of inquiry in the contemporary social sciences. The current proliferation of controversies over complex issues involving and mobilizing knowledge, technologies and societies has been a central field of action and inquiry for understanding the dynamics of the production of society, democracy and technoscience that today are specific to this field of study. Concerns about water security; the aerial spraying of glyphosate; public transport systems and mobility; the standardization of seeds and crops; the regulation of pharmaceutical industries, health delivery systems and alternative therapies, and even the redefinition of the boundaries between life and death in contestations around abortion and euthanasia are some examples of the objects of interest that are well understood from the perspective of STS.

In contemporary society risk seems to be everywhere and controversies proliferate around the experiences that contribute to its production, management and communication. While there are those who wonder why people resist the calls that are made from experts to evacuate an area at risk from some ‘natural disaster’, we in STS seek to understand how the collaborative production of risk- knowledge can be fostered to take into full account the lay expertise of those who do not have accreditation, but know well the lifeworld that they inhabit. Our essential tasks are to understand the formulation of scientific and technological policy and the dynamics of the production, democratization, communication, and social appropriation of knowledge; of course, with reference to technoscientific knowledge but also to enable critical reflection which questions the more traditional "methods" and explanatory policies in the contemporary social and human sciences. Genders, bodies, and sexualities, along with the different instruments involved in their practices, have been a specific object of reflection from the perspectives of feminist theory and STS that converge to understand these complex phenomena of contemporary societies. All the topics mentioned are important and have been part of our field. However, there are other issues that are interesting and require our attention. In the Colombia of today we also need to ask about other agendas of knowledge, as indicated in the title of the colloquium. Is the effort of peace- making a more difficult project in a world in which the old certainties are disappearing? Is ‘Peace’ compatible with a condition of ‘Post-truth’?

We call on those who are interested in these and other matters that are part of the agenda of our field, and that pose for us the project of the reassembly of our society, to participate in the Second National Colloquium on the Social Studies of Science and Technology, which will be held at the National University of Colombia, Bogotá, from 21 to 23 September, 2017.

The Second Colombian National Colloquium of Social Studies of Science and Technology will include the participation of 8 prominent local, 5 national and 3 international speakers, who will help us to discuss new debates, perspectives and research agendas.

2018 ANU conference on Circus and Science

April 03 2018 to April 05 2018 | Humanities Research Centre at the Australian National University i

Deadline: September 15 2017

http://hrc.anu.edu.au/events/imagineers-conference

Updated: September 17 2017

Scientists seek to investigate the ways in which nature works and to ask how humanity can best comprehend different aspects of the universe. By challenging conventional wisdom, scientists can act as rebels against the status quo and common sense. In cultural and fictional contexts, they may appear and behave like artists: creative, skilled craftsmen; ‘imagineers’ and bewildering performers. These fictional scientists do not merely domesticate the unknown and the uncanny, they also invent and stage it.

One of the most productive breeding grounds for the invention, amalgamation, and staging of scientific knowledge and creative imagination has been the circus and related cultural phenomena, such as freakshows, carnivals, and 19th-century ‘scientific’ museums. These sensational, kaleidoscopic institutions present(ed) manifold wondrous exhibits, including automatons, wax figures, and mummies, but they also presented scientific discoveries. Barnum’s American Museum, for example, made hundreds of previously unseen specimens accessible to a broad audience.

Exhibitions and shows of this type united science with mystery, acted as mediators of knowledge, and were often the primary public source of information about the current state of scientific research. They are reminders that science and its pursuits are matters of perspective, and the product and producer of good stories. What do these stories tell us about the “two cultures” of the humanities and science?

Keynote speakers

Professor Rosemarie Garland-Thomson (Emory University) Professor Jane Goodall (University of Western Sydney) Professor Richard Weihe (Accademia Teatro Dimitri/SUPSI Verscio, Switzerland) Professor Peta Tait (La Trobe University)

Focus

We welcome proposals for individual, 20-minute papers addressing any aspect of science and the circus (and related phenomena) including:

Cultural and literary studies Circus studies, Theatre and performance studies Indigenous literatures from around the world and their relation to science and performance Posthumanism Zoopoetics, animal art and critical animal studies Intersections of aesthetic and scientific treatments of cultural issues Imaginaries of technology and performance (e.g. in films) Museology, and applied art and science

While this conference is concerned primarily with culture and literature, we envisage it as a multi-disciplinary event and will welcome proposals from any disciplinary perspective.




To Boldly Preserve: Archiving for the Next Half-Century of Space Flight

March 01 2018 to March 03 2018 | American Institute of Physics in College Park, Maryland

Deadline: October 01 2017

Updated: September 17 2017

We will examine the unprecedented challenges and opportunities preserving the history of space exploration faces in this digital, big data era. New forms of electronic communication and data including oral histories and social media are changing the nature of historical records and increasing their ease of collection. Even as early generations of researchers, engineers, administrators and users retire, the number of countries, organizations, businesses, and other non-government actors involved in space is sharply expanding. Relying on the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) for U.S. government records management, while still essential, is increasingly inadequate. Furthermore, most of humanity experiences space exploration either as users (e.g., communications and weather) or as a source of imagination and enthusiasm. How do we document and archive the activities of hundreds of actors in space? How do we archive the experience of users? How do we archive imagination? The internet and widespread use of digital media have spurred tremendous popular interest in do- it-yourself oral history and other emerging methods for archiving among people not classically trained as historians, archivists, or records managers.

Done well, these bottom-up approaches could greatly expand the availability of historical records -- especially by groups, organizations, and individuals not fully captured by government archives. To examine critical issues in creating, collecting, preserving, and accessing space archives worldwide, this conference will bring the historical and archival communities together with space industry, records management, digital humanities, and library media management professionals. The conference will 1) explore data management strategies and toolboxes of exemplary best practices, 2) provide a variety of archival models for oral histories, digital, print, and less conventional collections management (such as software and artifacts), 3) disseminate these strategies and practices to space stakeholders, and 4) encourage underrepresented minorities and communities to create and archive their contributions to space history. To encourage discussion, we will pre-circulate conference papers to registrants and post them to the conference website. An edited volume based on the conference will be published as well as guides of best practices. Possible topics include but are not limited to: - Space archives: The first half-century - Space archives: Contemporary and future issues - Archiving space-based business and operations - Collecting and contextualizing social media, hardware and software - Integrating Do-It- Yourself history with archives - Legal concerns: Intellectual property rights, classification, Nondisclosure Acts, ITAR, records management, archiving by lawyers - Contract history: Templates for a successful project - Getting buy-in from individuals and organizations

- Reaching underrepresented people and areas - Archiving the experience of users - Finding archival partners and solutions - Ensuring access: Data management, ADA - Dissemination and diffusion of best practices While focused on space history, this NSF-funded conference aims to have a much larger impact by providing recommendations on policy and best practices. This conference addresses issues faced by all areas of history and science, technology, and society studies – encouraging high quality “history from below,” using new electronic technologies, preserving a wild range of materials, and educating a new generation of stakeholders. “To Boldly Preserve” will be held March 1-2, 2018 at the Center for the History of Physics at the American Institute of Physics in College Park, Maryland and will be conducted in English. The organizers can assist with travel and accommodation expenses for presenters. Please send a one- page abstract and one-page CV as one PDF file to toboldlypreserve@gmail.com by October 1, 2017. Decisions about acceptance will be made by November 1, 2017. For more information, contact Jonathan Coopersmith (j-coopersmith@tamu.edu), Angelina Callahan (angelina.callahan@nrl.navy.mil), or Greg Good (ggood@aip.org).

Making Science, Technology and Society Together

July 25 2018 to July 28 2018 | Lancaster University, UK

Deadline: November 08 2017

http://easst.net/easst-2018/

Updated: September 17 2017


The word ‘meeting’ contains rich and diverse meanings. In English we find the following: an act or process of joining or coming together of people or things; an intersection or confluence; an encounter; an assembly; a place and time for discussion or decision; a space for dissent, battle, entertainment or contest; and (archaically) a unit of measurement. *Meetings* has critical resonance at this time. Political and social forces – such as Brexit, Trump’s Presidency in the US, the rise in support for PVV in the Netherlands and for Front Nationale in France – seek to undo many relations and connections and to establish new, often exclusionary and destructive, alliances. That is, the politics of *meetings* is not a choice between doing or not doing relations, but rather to think about which actors meet and how, and to curate meetings that make some things present and other things absent. In this context, and in step with many other progressive responses, the EASST 2018 Conference will explicitly bring together, promote and celebrate meetings between, and differences within, the cultural and intellectual constituencies of STS. STS is located at the connexions of people, things and values. It is engaged with our sociotechnical lives and explores our interdependencies with multiple others. Preoccupations with logic and epistemology in early STS have been mixed with an intensified concern with aesthetics, values, ontologies, politics and emotions. Our conference theme promotes generative mixing through *meetings* in all senses of this word: as a practical activity, a substantive topic, a political engagement and as theoretical exploration. By doing so, we hope to open up ways to imagine how things within STS and in our social and political lives can be otherwise. We warmly welcome you to Lancaster as a meeting place for STS scholars.

Given the theme of *meetings* we have ‘un-structured’ the conference. We have identified a series of streams that have built upon the etymology of the word *meetings* in STS inflected ways. Our aim is that we will each encounter STS work in many different contexts as we seek analytic, critical and practical engagement with the theme of *meetings*. So, we invite you to think about your contribution in response to the following streams. *1. Encounters between people, things and environments* This stream has broad application in STS and contributions may focus on, for example, materialities, assemblages, the Anthropocene and changing climates, infrastructures in practice and the production and negotiation of risk. *2. Art and craft of joining and keeping things together* This stream invites a focus on doing, embodied knowledge and skills and the performativity of discourse in making and sustaining alliances. Work in this stream may therefore include: makers; engineering cultures, learning and collaborative work, and mending and repair. *3.

Confluence, collaboration and intersection* This stream invites exploration of how alignments and intersections occur. This might examine how ‘interests’ take shape, evolve, conjoin through innovation networks, technology adoption, infrastructures and standardisations; the dynamics of how social practices evolve, intersect and re-form over time; or the making of new alliances and forms of inclusive and creative collaboration. *4. Conflict, dissolution, contest* Meetings may be occasions where differences are aired, contested, bolstered or dissolved. This stream may include studies of controversy, ‘scandal’ and public dissent, organisational failure, partings, boundary making, and hierarchies. *5. Assembly, silence, dissent *Meetings may be thought of as spaces where legal, medical and/or environmental matters of concern are worked out, a place for convening publics and professionals. Contributions to this stream could explore how technologies and devices of governance assemble and sometimes silence different entities, recognising some knowledges, marginalising others, and producing unequal conditions of speech. *6. Discovery, discussion and decision* This stream offers a location for studies that explore historical and contemporary ‘moments’ of discovery and innovation, management of uncertainties and the distributedness of deliberation and ‘decisions’. These may be in, for example, the practice of health and medicine, science or urban laboratories, materialist grassroots activism, labs or processes of governance and policy making. *7. Measurement, commensuration, markets and values*

The problematisation of measurement has provided a rich seam of work across many fields of STS, for example, in the context of financial markets or the construction of ‘evidence’ in ‘evidence based medicine’. This stream invites analyses of the instruments of measurement, the values they carry, what they make visible and what they erase. Submissions *Open panel submissions* This year we move away from tracks and are instead organising the conference by the seven streams listed above, with an additional open stream. In the first instance, we invite colleagues to submit panel proposals indicating which stream they fit within. These panels will comprise a maximum of two 90-minute sessions, comprising a maximum of eight presentations. After decisions have been made as to which panel proposals are accepted, there will be an open call for paper proposals to these panels. Panel conveners will review and accept papers for inclusion within their panel, within guidelines set by the Programme Committee. Members of the Programme Committee will be responsible for overseeing a specific stream and will try to reallocate all abstracts submitted to that stream not accepted within existing panels or proposed to a ‘general’ panel. *Special ‘workshop’ proposals* In addition to open panel proposals, we also invite you to submit proposals for special workshops, involving some element of performance, which might entail practical activities or be a workshop. Given their nature, these ‘workshops’ may be closed rather than open. *Participation* Given the growing size of EASST conferences and the desire to be as inclusive as possible, individuals may be listed for a paper presentation and one other role (such as session convenor, chair or discussant but not a second paper) for a maximum of two appearances. *Facilities* The panel rooms will have a computer, a connected projector, and the facility to plug in laptops if presenters need to do so. Requests for video conferencing, speakers, etc can be made when proposing papers. /*

The conference sub-site and panel proposal form will follow in September.*/ Key dates (subject to change) *08/11/2017*: Deadline for panel (and workshop) proposals *08/12/2017*: Communication of accepted panels, opening of CFP *14/02/2018*: Deadline for individual paper abstract submissions (end of CFP) 14/03/2018: Accepted papers published on the website and registration opens 16/05/2018: Early-bird registration ends – prices rise! 25/06/2018: Publication of conference programme Local organising committee Brian Bloomfield (Centre for Science Studies/ Department for Organization, Work and Technology) Dawn Goodwin (Centre for Science Studies/Division of Medicine) (Co-chair of Programme Committee) Adrian Mackenzie (Centre for Science Studies/Department of Sociology/Data Science Institute) Nils Markusson (Lancaster Environment Centre) Maggie Mort (Centre for Science Studies/Department of Sociology) Celia Roberts (Centre for Science Studies/Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies/Department of Sociology) Vicky Singleton (Centre for Science Studies/Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies/Department of Sociology) (Co-chair) Bron Szerszynski (Centre for the Study of Environmental Change /Department of Sociology) Richard Tutton (Centre for Science Studies/Department of Sociology/Institute for Social Futures) (Co-chair) Gordon Walker (Lancaster Environment Centre/ESRC DEMAND) (Co-chair of Programme Committee) Claire Waterton (Centre for the Study of Environmental Change/Department of Sociology) Lisa Wood (Centre for Science Studies/Division of Medicine) The city Lancaster is small enough to explore on foot and there are regular bus services linking the city with the campus and with the local area, including the Lake District. Lancaster was designated a Cycling Town in 2005 and has a network of linked cycle tracks in the centre and around. The River Lune and the Lancaster Canal run through the centre. Lancaster has numerous historic buildings including the Castle c1150 (a site of witch trials in 1612 and a jail until 2012) and The Priory c1094.

The long standing connection with Quakerism is one of the inspirations for the theme of the conference. The Quakers, also known as The Religious Society of Friends, has its roots in 17C England, when small groups of ‘Seekers’ in towns and villages around the country coalesced around the informal leadership of George Fox. Early Quakers rejected professional priests, and held all life and all places to be equally sacred. They met in each other’s homes, and later in purpose-built ‘meeting houses’ where they waited silently for the Holy Spirit to guide them. Lancaster’s Friends Meeting House was built in 1708 and George Fox spent two years imprisoned in Lancaster Castle for his religious and social dissent and his preaching at The Priory. There are a variety of cultural activities related to science and technology in Lancaster including a Visitor Centre at the nearby Heysham Power Station. STS scholars at Lancaster have long been associated with local activism on technoscientific issues, for example around Cumbrian hill sheep farmers and the effects of the Chernobyl nuclear accident (1986), the effects of Foot and Mouth Disease (2001) and currently in relation to contestations over fracking. Lancaster has a wealth of restaurants and public houses, many in picturesque locations such as the canal side. There is also an award winning local brewery and a thriving shopping scene, with many independent shops. The bustling Charter Market is in the city’s historic centre every Wednesday and Saturday, and the Assembly Rooms is worth a visit to browse the eclectic mix of stalls selling vintage, period and retro clothing, comic books, art and memorabilia.

V annual meeting of Chilean STS network

January 17 2018 to January 19 2018 | Universidad ​ ​ Católica ​ ​ del ​ ​ Maule, ​ ​ sede ​ ​ Curicó

Deadline: October 31 2017

http://www.cts-chile.cl/ya-estan-disponibles-los-ejes-tematicos-de-v-encuentro-red-cts-chile

Updated: September 17 2017

We are inviting to send your proposals to our annual meeting entitled: “Plowing technological fields: ruptures and amalgams around the territorial tracts”. From 17 to 19 January of 2018 the STS discussion will be in one of typical agrarian places of the country and we are receiving proposals in English, Spanish and Portuguese until 31 October.

Technology, Mind, and Society

April 05 2018 to April 07 2018 | Washington, D.C.,

Deadline: October 20 2017

http://www.apascience.org/conference/index.html

Updated: September 17 2017

The American Psychological Association will hold an interdisciplinary conference on Technology, Mind, and Society in Washington, D.C., on April 5- 7, 2018. Scientists, practitioners, policymakers, and students from around the world are invited to participate in the event. The conference will provide a venue for reporting and assessing current efforts to understand and shape the interactions of human beings and technology, for identifying priorities for future work, and for promoting exchange and collaboration among participants. The conference will feature four keynote speakers: Cynthia Breazeal (MIT), Justine Cassell (Carnegie Mellon), Eric Horvitz (Microsoft Research), and Sandy Pentland (MIT). APA invites you and your colleagues and students to submit papers, symposia, and posters for this conference, which will be organized around the following broad themes: Basic research: How humans understand and use technology, impacts of technology on human experience and behavior, human-technology interactions as mutually adaptive systems, role of technology in advancing other areas of scientific research, and related topics. Foundations of technology design: Development of technologies informed by psychological, behavioral, and social science research. Applications: Development, use, and impact of specific technologies in domains such as aging, education, mental and physical health, recreation, and the workplace. www.apascience.org/conference/index.html


Broader implications: Ethical and policy questions concerning the opportunities and challenges arising from human-technology interactions. The deadline for submissions is October 20, 2017. Submissions can be made here. The conference is open to researchers, professionals, and students in all relevant areas, including psychology and other behavioral and social sciences, neuroscience, computer science, engineering, design, health research, education research, city and regional planning, public policy, history of science and technology, and philosophy. The conference aims to address the full range of contemporary and emerging technologies. These include but are not limited to artificial intelligence, robotics, mobile devices, social media, virtual/augmented reality, gaming, geographic information systems, autonomous vehicles, and biomedical technologies (e.g., brain-machine interfaces, genetic engineering). APA is sponsoring the conference in cooperation with the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and the Association for Computing Machinery — Special Interest Group for Computer-Human Interaction (ACM SIGCHI). We look forward to seeing you at the Technology, Mind, and Society Conference! For additional information, see the conference website. If you have any questions, please contact the APA Science Directorate (science@apa.org).

International Conference on Environmental Humanities

July 03 2018 to July 08 2018 | Universidad de Alcalá

http://www.institutofranklin.net/en/events/international-conference-on-environmental-humanities/

Updated: August 11 2017

Stories, Myths, and Arts to Envision a Change

Environmental humanities entail a transdisciplinary and transnational critical framework that is rapidly emerging in the last decade. This framework challenges traditional divisions among human, social, and environmental sciences, since they have proven to be obsolete in confronting, understanding, and articulating the most pressing social, cultural, and environmental challenges of the 21st century, as well as their multiple scales, risks, and representational difficulties. Environmental humanities emerge out of the convergence among environmental history and philosophy, ecocriticism, art and ecology, de-/post-colonial environmental thinking, earth systems science, philosophy of science, social and political ecology, ecofeminism, and so on. This international conference attempts to contribute to this fascinating debate while introducing it in Spain, where it has not yet been established.

Exploring Parallels Between Technoscientific and Social Scientific Knowledge Production

July 15 2018 to July 21 2018 | Toronto, Canada.

Deadline: September 30 2017

https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/wc2018/webprogrampreliminary/Session8157.html

Updated: August 11 2017

XIX ISA World Congress of Sociology: Power, Violence and Justice. Reflections, Responses, Responsibilities. July 15-21, 2018,

Session Host: RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology Organizers: Danny Otto, University of Rostock, Germany & Jing-Mao Ho, Cornell University, USA

Sociology of Technology and Science has advanced our understanding of processes in which scientific knowledge is (re-)produced. Scholars have delved deeply into scientific practices in many areas of the natural and technical sciences. But more recently, we have found increasing scholarly interest in studying social or “soft” sciences. These publications (along with earlier work in the sociology of knowledge) point to the importance of sociological self-reflection. They reveal the entanglement of social scientists with the “objects” they are trying to describe and the implications of social scientific knowledge for the understanding of society (e.g. interpretations of social inequality). Therefore, this session aims to bring together new developments in the sociological study of “social sciences/sociologies.”

How and under what circumstances is sociological knowledge produced? How are paradigms in sociology constructed? In what ways are power relations interwoven into the manufacturing of sociological knowledge - both, on the level of enabling research (e.g. political agenda setting, funding, working conditions, academic hierarchies) and disseminating results (e.g. perceptibility, review processes, digital distribution, status of authors)? Are there any technologies that have been normalized in producing sociological knowledge? What are the characteristics of academic sociology communities? How are networks of sociology shaped by actors/actants involved?

Above are some of the questions we expect to address during the session. We welcome any papers - both theoretical and empirical - that address the issues and topics in the sociology of sociologies as well as social sciences (e.g. economics, political science, psychology. philosophy, anthropology).

Please submit your contribution proposals via the official ISA conference website: The deadline for abstract submission is September 30, 2017.

If you have any questions regarding this session, please send your enquiries to danny.otto@uni-rostock.de

Sustaining the Seas

December 11 2017 to December 13 2017 | The University Of Sydney

Deadline: July 14 2017

www.sustainablefishlab.org

Updated: July 09 2017

Please send a 250-300 word abstract and affiliation details to kate.johnston@sydney.edu.au by 14th July 2017.

Sustaining the Seas is an exciting and experimental refereed international conference that will bring together academics of many disciplines, practitioners, urban planners, fishers, artists and writers to consider over three days the challenges of how to care better for the oceans, and more-than-human marine ecological systems. We will explore radically different modes of caring for oceanic spaces and ask what their effects might be for communities of fish and humans.

Hosted by the Sustainable Fish Lab at the University of Sydney, the conference will take place in one of the world’s most beautiful yet troubled harbour cities. This will be a unique opportunity to engage with local and global oceanic complexities through panel discussions, keynote speakers, films, demonstrations of innovative practice, and fieldtrips.

Keynotes Professor Lesley Green (UCT) Professor Rosemary Rayfuse (UNSW) Professor Elspeth Probyn (Sydney)

Plenary Sessions

Caring for Sea Country Dr. Leah Lui-Chivizhe (UNSW)

Speculative Harbours Gena Wirth (Scape), Dr. Adriana Vergés (UNSW)

Embodying the Ocean (Writing on the Sea) Dr. Astrida Neimanis (Sydney)

In-Conversation with Fishers John Susman (FishTale) and Cat Dorey (Greenpeace)

Surfing pollution Dr. Clifton Evers (Newcastle University, UK)

We welcome proposals on these topics and many more:

Fish markets: including anthropological, cultural studies, tourism, geographical, and economical perspectives; • Regulation of the high seas and the Law of the Sea; Oceanic warming, acidity and toxicity; geo-engineering; Forms of certification, governance, and traceability; Global South & North, northern hemisphere & southern hemisphere; Knowledges: gender, traditional, Indigenous, generational; Consumer engagement tactics that emphasise complexity rather than simplification; Indigenous/cultural fisheries; Gender, ethnicity, race, fish; queer fish; New forms of aquaculture and integrated marine tropic relationships; Global ocean grabbing, piracy, IUU. Methodologies, multidisciplinary and multimedia forms of representation.

Please visit the conference website for conference, including keynote speakers, plenary sessions, registrations, and fieldtrips. Or join us on social media through Facebook and Twitter.

PAPERS & PANEL PROPOSALS Please send a 250-300 word abstract and affiliation details to kate.johnston@sydney.edu.au by 14th July 2017.

CREATIVE PROVOCATIONS Contributions are sought from practitioners working in, or across, speculative design, poetic computation, fabrication, and art-related practice, including moving-image, audio, and performance. This stream of the conference aims to experiment with the traditional conference format and present diverse forms of engagement with the challenges of caring for marine environments.

Please send 250-300-word abstract, affiliation details and link to previous work to stream organisers susanne.pratt@uts.edu.au and kate.johnston@sydney.edu.au by 14th July 2017.

Abstracts should describe your creative provocation – subject matter and proposed form of presentation (limited to conference space and 20 minutes). Conference dates: 11 -13 December 2017

Organisers: Prof Elspeth Probyn (elspeth.probyn@sydney.edu.au), and Kate Johnston. Dept of Gender & Cultural Studies, The University of Sydney, in partnership with the Sydney Environment Institute

SIGCIS (Special Interest Group in Computing, Information, and Society)

October 29 2017 | Philadelphia, PA

Deadline: October 08 2017

http://meetings.sigcis.org/call-for-papers.html

Updated: July 09 2017


SIGCIS (Special Interest Group in Computing, Information, and Society) will be having its annual conference on October 29, 2017, in Philadelphia, PA, immediately following the conference for the Society for the History of Technology(SHOT). Proposals are due on June 30, 2017. Instructions for submissions can be found here.
THEME

Computers are instruments of action. They are made to measure, model, and mix; count and aggregate; save and surveil; pick, parse, and select; and in a world of embedded systems, they are even designed to listen, wait, and relay. In many instances, these actions involve the computational transformation of other social and technological processes—from software that compiles the census to the suites of code assisting in the digital manipulation of sound and image. In other cases, computers register and create information at scales and speeds we have only begun to grasp: artificial intelligence, machine learning, and “big data” in all its local forms. And while often leveraged as democratizing, computers have long been known to amplify structural inequality, map over difference, and jettison “noise” that cannot be translated into a specific form of information.

Measure, Model, Mix invites scholars and independent researchers across the disciplinary spectrum to explore the historical conditions of computation. Areas of engagement may include:

How have bureaucratic, scientific, and aesthetic computational instruments eroded, produced, and reproduced biopolitical and epistemological realities, past and present?
How can we analyze the relationships between computing and identity categories such as race, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity?
What are the historical foundations of computing’s contemporary capacity to recognize information?
How have cultures, subcultures, political systems and identity groups mobilized computational techniques for their own ends?


SIGCIS is especially welcoming of new directions in scholarship. We maintain an inclusive atmosphere for scholarly inquiry, supporting both disciplinary and theoretical interventions from beyond the traditional history of technology, and with respect to promoting diversity in STEM. We welcome submissions from: histories of technology, computing, and science; science and technology studies; studies of women, gender, and sexuality; studies of race, ethnicity, and postcoloniality; film, media, and game studies; software and code studies; network and internet histories; music, sound studies, and art history; and all other applicable domains.

The annual SIGCIS Conference begins immediately after the regular annual meeting of our parent organization, the Society for the History of Technology [SHOT]. SIGCIS welcomes everyone, inclusive of gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, ability, age, appearance, race, nationality or religion. We are committed to fostering a positive, productive space for all participants.

SUBMISSION FORMATS

SIGCIS welcomes proposals for individual 15-20 minute papers, 3-4 paper panel proposals, works-in-progress (see below), and non-traditional proposals such as roundtables, software demonstrations, hands-on workshops, etc.

WORKS-IN-PROGRESS

We are pleased to announce a new format for the 2017 SIGCIS Works in Progress (WiP) session. This year, participants will not deliver presentations on their WiP, and there will not be an audience. Instead, the session will serve as a workshop wherein participants will discuss the works in small group sessions.

We invite works in progress—articles, chapters, dissertation prospectuses—of 10,000 words or less (longer works must be selectively edited to meet this length). We especially encourage submissions from graduate students, early career scholars, and scholars who are new to SIGCIS. Authors who submit a WiP will also commit to reading (in advance) two other WiPs, discussing them in a very small group setting, and providing written feedback on one of those WiPs. Scholars who would like to participate in this session without submitting their own WiP are certainly welcome; we ask that they commit to reading (in advance) at least two of the WiPs.

Submissions for WiP only require a 350-400 word abstract, but applicants should plan to circulate their max-10,000-word WiPs no later than October 8, 2017. Scholars who would like to be a reader of WiPs, please email a brief bio or 1-page CV, along with your areas of interest and expertise, to Gerardo Con Diaz [condiaz@ucdavis.edu].

SUBMISSION PROCEDURES

Submissions are due June 30, 2017. Applicants must download, fill out and follow the instructions on the application cover sheet posted at the website.

All submissions will require:

350-400 word abstract (full panel proposals should additionally include a 300-word panel abstract in addition to 3-4 paper abstracts)
1-page CV or resume


Please Note: Individuals already scheduled to participate on the main SHOT program are welcome to submit an additional proposal to our workshop, but should make sure that there is no overlap between the two presentations. However, SIGCIS may choose to give higher priority to submissions from those not already presenting at SHOT. Questions regarding submission procedure should be sent to Kera Allen [kera.allen@gatech.edu].

TRAVEL AWARD

The top financial priority of SIGCIS is the support of travel expenses for graduate students, visiting faculty without institutional travel support, and others who would be unable to attend the meeting without travel assistance. The submission cover sheet includes a box to check if you fall into one of these categories and would like to be considered for an award. These is no separate application form, though depending on the volume of requests and available resources we may need to contact you for further information before making a decision.

Any award offered is contingent on registering for and attending the SIGCIS Conference. Please note that SHOT does not classify the SIGCIS Conference as participation in the SHOT annual meeting, therefore so acceptance by SIGCIS does not imply eligibility for the SHOT travel grant program.

Details of available awards are at http://www.sigcis.org/travelaward.

STS Italia Summer School

September 05 2017 to September 09 2017 | Catania, Italy

Deadline: June 25 2017

Updated: July 09 2017

STS Italia, the Italian Society of Science and Technology Studies – in collaboration with the Department of Political and Social Sciences and the Department of Mathematics and Informatics of the University of Catania is organizing its 4th Summer School, “Almost Human: Robotics, Healthcare and STS”, to be held in Catania (Italy) from September 5th to 9th, 2017.

Goals and main topics Robotics in its various applications and research fields (work, leisure, medicine, care, education, military use, etc.) emerges as a set of technological innovations designed to have a disruptive impact on the economy, politics, and society. Technological artifacts pervasively permeate different spheres of personal and professional life, reconfiguring the relationship between humans and humans and artifacts. Robots, in their various forms, are a “presence” which calls/solicits our attention. After colonizing factories and research laboratories, robots, humanoid or animal, “dispersed” in our technological environments as meta-media (the chatbot, for example), or as professionals of care, are already living among us, populating our cities, inhabiting our homes, taking care of us, and even observing what we do. Consequently, the development of robotics raises new questions in a great number of ethical, legal, social and anthropological issues.

The STS Italia Summer School aims to address the challenges posed by recent developments in robotics and artificial intelligence through a variety of approaches, theoretical frameworks and methodological insights. PhD students and early career researchers in Science and Technology Studies (STS) are invited to participate in a joint reflection that will try to trace some interdisciplinary interpretative frameworks and to propose a space of exchange between social sciences and scientific research. A particular attention will be given to the role of robotics in the field of health and care. We would like to question the relationship between technological innovation and new practices, or relationships, of care; to question the professional reconfigurations and skills modified by the introduction of assistive technological devices to the cure gesture (surgery, for example) and care practices (in homes and hospitals); to highlight the different concepts of care receivers and care givers that emerge in the contexts of innovation and in always singular and specific contexts of practices andeveryday life (prosthetics, assistive robotics, etc.).

These issues can be addressed more politically and institutionally (issues of surveillance, infrastructures, social, economic and research policies); at an intermediate level, in the boundaries between private and public sector (in particular as regards the transfer of skills and practices between place of cure – hospital - and place of life - home); at individual level in familiar and professional relationships of care. A question that surely crosses the technological, sociological, institutional and ethical aspects is the concept of autonomy (of person, of patient, of devices, of familiar or professional collectives), which increasingly includes the human and non-human relationship in its definition, in particular in the healthcare field.

This summer school introduces participants to major approaches, exploring new research frontiers and emerging themes under ethical, cultural and socio-technical perspectives:

- Autonomy (of technological devices, of person, of systems), which includes the notion of enable/disable, empowerment, accessibility, dependency; - Robotics in work’s contexts (in particular in healthcare); - Human/non human relationship (in particular in healthcare, which includes non human animals); - Imaginaries of the body, the machine, the hybrid (cyborg); - Ethical and legal approaches; - Technological innovation in healthcare: state of the art, perspectives, problems; - Epistemological and theoretical approaches to robotics and AI; - Technological innovation in healthcare and disabilities and gender studies; Confirmed speakers - Nathanael Jarassé (ISIR Paris) - Louis Neven (Avans University of Applied Sciences, The Netherlands) - Giovanni Muscato (University of Catania, Italy) - Fiorella Operto (Scuola di Robotica and CNR, Genoa, Italy) - Michael Schillmeier (University of Exeter, GB) - Bruno Siciliano (University of Naples, Italy) - Guglielmo Tamburrini (University of Naples, Italy) How to apply The application form is available here.

After space for personal details, the form includes a place to upload a short scientific CV (maximum 2 pages) and a statement of interest (maximum 500 words), which should describe the applicant’s current research and its relevance to the aims of the summer school. Finally, a statement of purpose (maximum 500 words) is mandatory only for scholarship applications. Applications must be submitted electronically to the Summer School Organizing Committee at:summerschool@stsitalia.org. Applications deadline is June 15th. *Deadline extension: June 25th* Important dates June 15th, 2017: Applications deadline. *Deadline extension: June 25th, 2017.* June 25th, 2017: *June 30th, 2017: *Notification for participation and for scholarship eligibility. July 10th, 2017: Registration deadline. For any further questions regarding the school not hesitate to contact the Organizing Committee via email at summerschool@stsitalia.org.

The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA)

April 03 2018 to April 07 2018 | Philadelphia, PA,

Deadline: October 15 2017

www.sfaa.net/annual-meeting/

Updated: July 09 2017

"Sustainable Futures" invites abstracts (sessions, papers and posters) for the Program of the 78th Annual Meeting

The Society is a multi-disciplinary association that focuses on problem definition and resolution. We welcome papers from all disciplines. The deadline for abstract submission is October 15, 2017. For additional information on the theme, abstract size/format, and the meeting, please visit our web page (www.sfaa.net/annual- meeting/).

SPECULATIVE HARBOURING PG WORKSHOP

December 11 2017 to December 13 2017 | The University of Sydney and UTS

Deadline: July 24 2017

Updated: July 09 2017

Sydney Environment Institute in partnership with The Department of Gender & Cultural Studies, The University of Sydney and UTS As part of The Sustainable Fish Lab’s Sustaining the Seas conference (11th-13th December).

Workshop and walk shop dates: 12 of September and 15 of September

This two day intensive walk-shop/workshop offers an opportunity to engage with some of the invisible aspects of Sydney Harbour. From the microscopic underworld to the often-obscured cultural layers, we will consider place in new ways. On day one we will walk along the Blackwattle Bay foreshore, stopping, observing, questioning, listening and considering the many speculative layers coalescing in Sydney Harbour—ecological, cultural, economic and political. We will hear from experts from diverse disciplines (marine biology, humanities, fine arts), industries (fisheries), and Indigenous knowledge holders of the harbour.

Ultimately, participants will weave new interdisciplinary harbour narratives through the creation of speculative field guides that invite others to experience and respond to the harbour in new ways.

Participants will be invited to present on this project at the upcoming Sustaining the Seas conference (11th-13th December). We will also encourage conference attendees to make use of the future-oriented field guides.

Workshop Dates:

Walk-shop: Tuesday 12 September

Workshop: Friday 15 September


EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST: Monday 24th July

Please send expressions of interest to kate.johnston@sydney.edu.au and susanne.pratt@uts.edu.au
Include disciplinary affiliations, current research, and what you hope to contribute and achieve in the workshop. We will tailor activities to the group.

Organisers: Prof Elspeth Probyn: elspeth.probyn@sydney.edu.au

Kate Johnston: kate.johnston@sydney.edu.au Susanne Pratt: Susanne.Pratt@uts.edu.au

midweSTS 2017 Call for Abstracts

September 29 2017 to October 01 2017 | Indiana University, Bloomington IN

Deadline: July 16 2017

https://midwestsnetwork.wordpress.com/

Updated: July 09 2017

Graduate students at the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University are excited to distribute our call for a graduate student workshop happening on campus this fall. We would very much appreciate your help in distributing the CFP with us! Science and technology studies is widely regarded as an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary effort, and we need your help in disseminating information about the event to the farthest reaches of our scholarly community. The deadline for submissions has been extended by a few weeks; please email us directly with any questions you may have about the process or event. If you would like to tweet about the call, you can link our website and account @midweSTSnetwork


midweSTS invites graduate student submissions for a 3-day workshop addressing themes in critical, decolonial, feminist, anti-racist, transnational, queer, and ecological potentials in science and technology studies, as well as critical doing/making and design studies. We invite work engaging in the politics of creation and political intervention, as well as scholars working in the regional in-between that gets called “Midwest,” including the Great Lakes region; lands variously territorialized by histories of settler colonialism, indigenous presence and practice, industrialism and its alternatives, black technocultures, migrant makings, and visible and invisible genealogies of innovation. It’s a region that today is often positioned as a deindustrial periphery despite its lively and ongoing technoscientifc and political innovations, experimentations, and solidarities. This event, which is the second annual midweSTS Graduate Workshop, gathers together the exciting critical work being created in this region and aims towards building stronger networks and communities between emerging scholars and researchers.

We welcome 500-700 word proposals for a variety of formats – from dissertation-based projects and standard talks to hands-on workshops and interdisciplinary demos. Those proposing traditional presentations may assemble a pre-formed panel presentation of 3-4 papers, or submit abstracts as an open call to be gathered into panels. Proposals should include:

- A description of the content and style of your presentation

- A short biography elaborating on your background and your interest in participating

- 5 keywords, concepts, or themes that your project can be tagged by

- Panel proposals should include a brief rationale for the panel including panelist biographies, as well as full abstracts for each paper, in a single PDF

- Hands-on workshops will be limited to 35 minutes and presentations and demos to approximately 20 minutes each. Basic supplies will be offered on site. If you have special needs (such as whiteboards, paper, creative tools, an open space, etc.) for your proposed session please note this in your proposal.

The workshop is sponsored by University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign), University of Michigan (Ann Arbor), University of Notre Dame, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Illinois Institute of Technology, in addition to the Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing, IU Geography Department, and IU Department of History and Philosophy of Science.

Free housing with local grad students is available on a first come first served basis.

Please submit your proposal as a PDF to: midwests.workshop@gmail.com by our extended deadline of: Sunday, July 16th, 2017

If you have questions, please contact the organizers at midwests.workshop@gmail.com, with a copy to chrimile@indiana.edu. You can also find us on Twitter at @midweSTSnetwork and our website https://midwestsnetwork.wordpress.com/

The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) i

April 03 2018 to April 07 2018 | Philadelphia, PA,

Deadline: October 15 2017

www.sfaa.net/annual- meeting

Updated: June 12 2017

Invites abstracts (sessions, papers and posters) for the Program of the 78th Annual Meeting The theme of the Program is “Sustainable Futures.” The Society is a multi-disciplinary association that focuses on problem definition and resolution. We welcome papers from all disciplines. For additional information on the theme, abstract size/format, and the meeting, please visit our web page.

Reconfiguring care infrastructures – austerity and innovation in European welfare services.

November 15 2017 to November 16 2017 | University of Sussex in Brighton

Deadline: June 15 2017

Updated: June 08 2017

We would like to invite papers for an international workshop exploring the reconfiguration of health and welfare in different European settings.

Papers should address the ways in which austerity policies, welfare reforms or healthcare innovations relocate or relegate the work and practice of care in particular settings, though we hope the event will allow for comparison across different experiences from across Europe.

The concept of the ‘chronic care infrastructure’ (Langstrup 2013) has been used to think about the ways in which health services are embedded and linked with other services, and rely on particular distributions of care / work across formal and informal providers. In this it has something in common with ‘care configurations’ (Lyon and Glucksman 2008) and with older work on welfare regimes (Esping Anderson 1990). Like feminist discussions of welfare policy, we propose paying attention to distributions of ‘visible and invisible work’ (Star & Strauss 1999) to gain insights into the normative shifts in the valuation of care tasks in the context of austerity and the changing ‘burden of treatment’ in chronic disease (e.g. May et al 2014). We are also interested in contributions that consider the role of care innovations – technical or otherwise – as tools of welfare transformation, whether they are seen as contributing to cost containment or not (e.g. Pols and Willems 2011; Mort, Roberts and Callen 2013).

We are delighted that Professor Jeanette Pols (University of Amsterdam) has agreed to present a keynote, and would be glad to hear other paper proposals from people at any stage in their career that address the following themes:

1. Displacing care – from health to social care and vice versa

2. The role of family and friends as care providers

3. The self-caring citizen – participation and new civic virtues

4. The multiple roles of care innovation/welfare technology

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted to c.will@sussex.ac.uk by 15th June. We will inform authors if they are accepted by 5th July and hope that will give time for presenters to prepare a short written draft for circulation before the workshop. We will be able to offer 5 fully funded places for Early Career Researchers (others will need to fund travel / accommodation and a very small registration fee ). Please indicate whether your attendance is dependent on funding when you submit your abstract. This event is possible thanks to generous support from the Foundation for the Sociology of Health and Illness.

GROUP 2018 ACM International Conference on Supporting Group Work

January 07 2018 to January 10 2018 | Sanibel Island, Florida, USA

http://www.acm.org/confe rences/group/conferences/group18

Updated: June 08 2017


Deadlines: Multiple

General Information For over 25 years, the ACM International Conference on Supporting Group Work (GROUP) has been a premier venue for research on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Human Computer Interaction, Computer Supported Collaborative Learning and Socio - Technical Studies. The conference integrates work in social science, computer science, engineering, design, values, and other diverse topics related to group work, broadly conceptualized .
Group 201 8 continues the tradition of being tru ly international and interdisciplinary in both organizational structure as well as participants. Key goals for the program are to encourage and facilitate researchers within CSCW and HCI to interact across disciplinary boundaries. We encourage high - level research contributions from interdisciplinary groups to pres ent work that might be difficult to place within one simple category. We are open to diverse and innovative research methods, and to contributions across broad areas such as systems, so ciety, participation, critique, collaboration, and human interaction. GROUP 201 8 in particular would like to enc ourage systems designers, builders, and researchers from industry, academia , government and other interested groups to participate. Partici pati on at GROUP takes many different forms. In 2018, we will continue two new submissions categories that were introduced in 2016.

First, GROUP 2018 will again offer the opportunity to authors of newly published papers from the Journal of CSCW ( http://link.springer.com/journal/10606 ) to present their papers in the conference. Second, the submission category “Design Fictions” will be maintained. Submissions to the conference are welcome in the form of:
● Research Papers (both short and long). This venue gives the occasion to present and interact with the audience. Accepted papers will be published in the Conference Proceedings and ACM Digital Library. Please use the ACM S IGCHI format for submissions. We invite archival submissions in the form of either full Papers or shorter contributions (Notes). A Note is a brief report of a more limited, b ut definitive, outcome or theoretical development. There is no page limit for Papers or Notes, although clear rationale should be given for Papers that exceed 10 pages o r for Notes that exceed 4 pages . Research Paper submissions must be completed online at the GROUP 2018 conference site: https://precisionconference.com/~group/
• Work ing Papers (WP). WPs are contributions in which the authors are working towards an archival journal submission and would like to discuss their work with their colleagues at GROUP. Our goal is to broaden the conversations at GROUP, with a format that may appeal to colleagues w hose primary publications are in journals, rather than conference papers. WPs will not be published in the conference proceedings, but will be distributed in a paper conference supplement at the GROUP conference for the attendees only. Therefore, you are f ree to seek formal publication of a draft journal submission that appears in a WP. The WP review process will be *lightweight*, without any revisions asked to the authors, to expand the GROUP community and discussions. Please send submissions directly to c o - chairs at w p @group201 8 .org.
● Design Fictions – Fictive Futures: Exploring Future Research Agendas . We seek submissions that imagine possible futures for research on the relationships between computers and people. Submissions will include two portions: a fictional document related to the conduct of research and an author statement about the document. The fiction document could be an extended abstract, a call for papers, an excerpt from API documentation, a book review, a study protocol for IRB review, or any other relevant type. The author statement should connect that document to current events, cite on - going research in the field, or otherwise extrapolate how the envisioned future might arise from our given present. This statement will be especially important for abstracts (which are too short to explain their rationale), API documentations (which typica lly do not provide a historical rationale), and other documents that on their own may be exceptionally short and/or vague. Because Design Fictions are archival contributions, we recommend a minimum length of 3 pages, and as many as 10 pages. Please use the ACM SIGCHI Format for submissions. The reviewing process will be the same as the general track, and Design Fiction papers or notes will be included in the proceedings. Design Fiction submissions must be co mpleted online at the GROUP 2018 conference site: https://precisionconference.com/~group/ ● Posters and demos . Posters and demos are an opportunity to present late - breaking and preliminary results, small er results not suitable for a Paper or Note submission, innovative ideas not yet validated through user studies, student research in early phases, and other research best presented in this open format. Posters and demos will be displayed at a special sessi on in the conference when poster and demo authors will be available to discuss their work. Poster submissions should include an extended abstract no longer than 4 pages, including all figures and references, in ACM SIGCHI Format ( available here ). In addition, submissions should also include a separate Tabloid (A3 or 11 x 17 inches) sized draft of the poster for review purposes. Both the extended abstract and the poster draft should include aut hor names (these are not anonymous submissions). Please send submissions directly to co - chairs at posters@group201 8 .org.
● Workshops . Workshops provide an informal and focused environment for the information exchange and discussion of Group related topic s. We offer half or full day workshop venues. Proposals should include an abstract (max 150 words), a title, description of workshop theme, aim, goals, activities and potential outcomes. Workshop proposals should also include a description of how the works hop will be publicized and a strategy for recruiting and selecting participants. It should specify any audio/visual equipment needed, maximum number of participants, the duration of the workshop (half or full day) and the names and backgrounds of the organizer(s). Please submit a maximum of four pages, using the ACM SIGCHI format for submissions.

We encourage opics suitable for developing new ideas and deep discussions. Please send submissions directly to co - chairs at workshops@group201 8 .org. ● Doctoral Colloquium . The Doctoral Colloquium provides a forum for sharing ongoing Ph.D . projects of participants with other advanced Ph.D. students and distinguished faculty for mentoring and feedback. Space is limited, so an application of up to four pages is required, in the ACM standa rd format . Please contact the workshop co - chairs at dc@group201 8 .org. Accepted research papers, notes, Design Fictions, posters, and doctoral consortium extended abstracts are pu blished in the ACM Press Conference Proceedings and in the ACM digital Library. Accepted Workshop proposals will be published in a paper - based supplement. Conference Topics: ● Theoretical and/or conceptual contributions about key concepts relevant to CSCW and HCI, including critique. ● Social, behavioral, and computational studies of collaboration and communication. ● Technical architectures supporting collaboration. ● New tool/toolkits for collaborative technologies. ● Ethnographic studies of collaborative p ractices. ● Coordination and workflow technology. ● Social computing and contexts of collaboration. ● Online communities, including issues of privacy, identity, trust, and participation. ● Cooperative knowledge management. ● Organizational issues of technology design, use, or adaptation. ● Strategies for use of technology in business, government, and newer forms of organizations. ● Emerging technologies and their design, use, or appropriation in work, home, leisure, entertainment, or education. ● Learning at the workp lace (CSCL at work, Technology - Enhanced Learning, TEL). ● Co - located and geographically - distributed teams, global collaboration. ● Cultural and cross - cultural collaboration and communication. ● Mobile and wearable technologies in collaboration. ● Innovative forms of human computer interaction for cooperative technologies. Important

Dates Papers and Notes Abstract and Title Submission:
June 23, 2017 Papers and Notes Submission Deadline: July 1, 2017 Papers and Notes De cisions Announced: September 15 , 2017 (Camera ready Oct 27) Design Fictions Submission Deadline: July 1, 2017 Design Fictions Decisions Announced: September 15, 2017 (Camera ready Oct 27) Doctoral Colloquium Appli cations Deadline: July 10, 2017 Doctoral Colloquium D ecisions Announced: September 15, 2017 (Camera ready Oct 27) Workshop Proposals Deadline: July 14 , 2017 Workshop Proposals Deci s ions Announced: Friday, July 2 8 , 2017 (Camera ready Oct 27) Workshop Participants Papers Deadline(s): Oct/Nov 2017 , may vary per workshop Posters/Demos Deadline: September 18, 2017 Posters/Demos Decisions Announced: October 16, 2017 (Camera ready Oct 27) Working Papers (WP) Deadline: Oct 2, 2017 Working Papers Decisions Announced: October 27, 2017 Conference dates: January 7 - 10 , 201 8

If you have questions, please contact the conference organizers: General Chairs: Andrea Forte, Drexel University chairs@group2018.org or visit: http://group.acm.org/conferences/group18/CFP.pdf

Technologies of Frankenstein

March 07 2018 to March 09 2018 | Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, USA

Deadline: October 19 2017

http://frankenstein2018.org/

Updated: June 08 2017



The 200th anniversary year of the first edition of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: Or, The Modern Prometheus has drawn worldwide interest in revisiting the novel’s themes. What were those themes and what is their value to us in the early twenty-first century? Mary Shelley was rather vague as to how Victor, a young medical student, managed to reanimate a person cobbled together from parts of corpses. Partly as a result of this technical gap, and partly as a result of many other features of the novel, Frankenstein continues to inspire discourse in scholarly, popular, and creative culture about the Monstrous, the Outsider, the Other, and scientific ethics. This conference will examine such connections in our thinking about humanism and techno-science from the novel’s publication to the present. We construe broadly the intersecting themes of humanism, technology, and science and we welcome proposals from all fields of study for presentations that add a twenty-first century perspective to Frankenstein. Topic areas may include but are not limited to:

 Artificial Intelligence and Robotics

 Branding “Frankenstein” (Food, Comics, Gaming, Music, Theater, Film)

 Computational and Naval Technology (Mapping, Navigation, The Idea of the Journey)

 Digital Humanities and GeoHumanities (Applications, Pedagogy, Library/Information

Technology)

 Engineering Technologies: Past/Present/Future (Chemical, Electrical, Biomedical)

 Future Technologies and Labor Concerns

Submit abstracts of 300 words and brief CV by 15 October 2017 to Michael Geselowitz (mgeselowitz@ieee.org) and Robin Hammerman (rhammerm@stevens.edu).

Mixing Pop and Politics

December 04 2017 to December 06 2017 | Massey University, Wellington, Aotearoa/New Zealand

Deadline: June 01 2017

Updated: May 08 2017

Subversion, Resistance and Reconciliation in Popular Music IASPM-ANZ 2017 Conference

Forty years ago, the story goes, punk broke. Not for the first time, and not the last. History provides us with ample examples of the power of popular music to speak to, through, and against various political moments. The contemporary situation also offers countless opportunities to explore how popular music revisits, reconstitutes, rewrites and reconciles itself to this past. At the same time, it also points to new directions informed by the complicated position popular music occupies in relation to the shifting paradigms of power in which we currently find ourselves. This IASPM-ANZ conference aims to explore the complex politics of resistance, subversion, containment and reconciliation from now and then, as well as points in-between.

We are seeking papers and panel proposals that touch on, but are not restricted to, the following areas:

• (We’re) Stranded: Punk and Post-Punk in Australia, New Zealand and Beyond • I Will Survive: The Politics of Pleasure and Popular Music • You Don’t Own Me: Cultivating, Codifying and Commodifying Resistance • You've Got the Power: Populism, Authoritarianism, Anarchy and Popular Music • This Machine Kills Fascists: Technologies, Politics and Popular Music • The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Popular Music on Screen(s) • Here’s Where The Story Ends: Alternate Histories of Popular Music • Last Night a DJ Saved My Life: Of DJs, Dancefloors and Discos • We Are the Robots: Resistant, Reconciled, Reconstituted, Recombinant Bodies in Popular Music • If You’re Feeling Sinister: Affect, Emotion and the Subversive Power of Popular Music • Playing With a Different Sex: Otherness and Othering in Popular Music • A Whisper to a Scream: Silence, Distortion, Amplification and the Politics of Sound

Abstracts should be no more than 250 words, and should include 3-5 keywords. Please submit abstracts in doc, docx, rtf format, and send as “last name.xxx” to iaspmanz2017@gmail.com

Deadline for abstract submission: June 1st 2017.

All participants must be members of IASPM. If you are not a member, details on how to join are available here: http://iaspm.org.au/membership/.

We encourage all members of IASPM-International to consider attending.

13th IFIP TC9 Human Choice and Computers Conference

September 17 2017 to September 21 2017 | Poznan, Poland

Deadline: January 15 2018

http://www.hcc13.net

Updated: May 08 2017

"This Changes Everything" --€“ in conjunction with the World Computer Congress
Conference Chairs: David Kreps, Kai Kimppa, Louise Leenen, Charles Ess

Conference Theme - Track Chairs: David Kreps and Charles Ess

This Changes Everything. Many of us likely associate this phrase with Steve Jobs’ introduction of the iPhone in 2007. But there are clearly other candidates for the "€ This,"€ e.g., the oncoming bioinformatics redesign of species or the fourth industrial revolution of artificially intelligent robots. But "This" is also, without question, the greatest challenge of our age: climate change.

Accordingly, the 13th Human Choice and Computers conference centers on the question: ICT and Climate Change - What Can We Do? The Conference invites both academics and practitioners in the field of ICTs and Society to take stock of their engagements, review their focus, and assess what and how each and every one of us might be able to contribute to the transformations needed (and already beginning) in local, regional, national and international contexts, towards becoming the diverse, environmentally and socially conscious, and thriving communities.

We welcome submissions that speak directly and less directly to the conference theme. “This Changes Everything†implicates both climate change and the interrelated global challenges most central to the Working Groups of TC9 and its National Society representatives, including the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Submissions are also welcome, not just to the General Conference Track on change, but to the other foci of the Track Themes. (For complete track descriptions, please see the extended CFP on the conference website, http://www.hcc13.net .)

Track themes: * Societal implications, effects and impacts of artificial intelligence - Track Chairs: Diane Whitehouse and Christopher Zielinski (WG9.2)

* Including critical issues beyond the ICT context in codes of conduct/ethics - Track Chairs: Kai Kimppa and Penny Duquenoy (SIG9.2.2)

* Our digital lives - Track Chairs: Petros Chamakiotis and Brad McKenna (WG9.5)

* This changed everything - Track Chair: Christopher Leslie (WG9.7)

* Gender in ICT - Track Chairs: Sisse Finken, Christina Mörtberg and Johanna Sefyrin (WG9.8)

* ICT and sustainability - Track Chairs: Thomas Lennerfors and Per Fors (WG9.9)

* Climate risk, cyber-security, and the dark web - Track Chair: Louise Leenen (WG9.10)

* Privacy, data protection, and automation - Track Chair: Taro Komukai (Japan National Representative)

* ICT and an inclusive society - Track Chairs: Hossana Twinomurinzi and Jackie Phahlamohlaka (South Africa National Representative)

Submissions Full papers are invited that address the Conference Theme, or any of the above Track Themes. All papers will be subject to double-blind review. Authors of accepted papers will be invited to revise their work in keeping with reviewers’ comments prior to formatting, and inclusion in the Programme and Proceedings. Travel, accommodation and all other details will be posted when available at http://www.hcc13.net/

Submissions will be through Springer OCS Website, with proceedings published in the AICT Springer Book series immediately prior to the conference.

Important Dates Full paper deadline 15th January 2018 Reviews and revisions during February, March and April, 2018. Final Papers by 30th April, 2018.

CFP: Strategic Narratives of Technology and Africa

September 01 2017 to September 02 2017 | Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute, Funchal, Portugal

Deadline: May 12 2017

http://snta.m-iti.org/

Updated: May 08 2017

Thematic Overview

In 1884, a group of thirteen European policymakers met to negotiate standards for the "effective occupation" of Africa. At the time of this now-infamous Berlin Conference, about 10 percent of Africa was under European control. By 1914 Europe "controlled" 90 percent of the continent.

In 1987, a little over one hundred years after Berlin, a group of technologists from fifteen European countries met on the island of Madeira, and in a highly fractious and politicized meeting set standards to divide time and radio spectrum, narrowly agreeing on the technical specification of the GSM mobile telephone system. At the time less than 1 percent of Africa was covered by phones. By 2014 mobile "penetration" in sub-Saharan Africa was around 80 percent.

Africa was never mentioned in the Madeira meeting. Indeed the UK representative described the spread of GSM to people globally, including those who "live in the poorest countries on the planet," as an "unintended consequence." Yet, mobiles have been described as "the new talking drums" (de Bruijn), and a "communication lifeline" (Pew Research Center) that will "pave way for huge opportunities" (Financial Times).

Phones have swept through the African continent in the last decade, followed by WhatsApp, fiber, and mobile payment systems. As recently as 2000 Manuel Castells could call Africa "the black hole of the information society," but now the World Bank speaks of the "African digital renaissance," citing a proliferation of tech hubs and locally produced apps. The "Africa Rising" narrative focuses on the peaks of a complex terrain with many remarkable innovations and translations, while at the same time access is almost wholly owned by Mark Zuckerberg and a handful of telcos. In the valleys one government falsely tells its activist citizens that it has cracked WhatsApp's encryption, while another restricts the use of Skype, and around the continent mobile operators extract the most rent possible from their poorest customers, creating new forms of poverty. International funders preach development through entrepreneurship, teach tech innovation based on Silicon Valley models, and support mobile application development for "strengthening social inclusion." Inclusion, though, also means imbrication into a global financial information system that is better known for its shocks than its comforts, with new forms of micro-lending and mobile cash allowing neoliberal financialization of those at the "bottom of the pyramid" and in the most rural areas.

The Conference

The conference brings scholars, technologists, and cultural producers together on the island of Madeira: a European territory off the coast of Africa, a historical site of mutual entanglement between the Atlantic continents, and a point of departure for European expansion. Here we'll strategize ways to revisit, reframe, and recode the future of technology on and for the continent. What can African theorists, technologists, and cultural producers do to generate alternatives to the influx of neocolonial narratives of tech entrepreneurship? Taking as a given that Africa is "a variegated site of innovation" (Mavhunga), what are key epistemologies and ways of being which are endemic in Africa that should be offered to the world through new systems and processes? Technology is politics by other means (Latour), even if its agency is generally dissimulated. How, then, might we consider anew progressive social and political goals and their conjoining with cultures of technical creativity already embedded in Africa's diverse contexts of life? How might new strategic narratives nurture and promote a vision of the continent as a crucible for radical new socio-technical paradigms? How can an African information economy avoid the dynamics of the resource curse, where connectivity is extractive and exercised upon African citizens rather than by and through them? What can Western technologists do differently, and what are the spaces for collaboration? This conference aims to reinvestigate these relationships and engender dialog between African and Western audiences and participants, who should leave Madeira equipped with new strategies and new collaborative partnerships.

We are accepting papers, creative works, and technologies that explore or demonstrate alternative socio-technical strategies. Contributions should be grounded in analysis and move toward synthesis: We hope to paint the "art of the [radical] possible" and generate new threads and pathways for the development of fresh technologies. We hope that this focus on the possible near future will differentiate this event from many generative but more phantasmal Afro-futurist speculations. Creative works and technologies eligible for consideration may include, but are not limited to: software, technical systems ("low" or "hi"), images, objects, demos, film/video, poetry, performances, interventions, illustration, and more. Works will be selected by jury for an exhibition in Funchal, the capital city of Madeira, at the galleries of the Colégio dos Jesuitas, a re-purposed 16th century Jesuit compound.

Example themes include:

*Alternative globalist or transnational technologies

*African technical epistemologies

*Activist or political new media

*Re-coding remittances

*Technologies of migration and diaspora

*Technology and race

*Decolonizing ICT4D, Tech4D, and M4D

*Postcolonial computing

*Markets, math, and statistics of domination

*Histories of Africa and global production

*Non-western (or syncretic) applied science

*Anti-extractive technical and financial systems

*Artist's critical interventions into technology and technical practice

*Guidelines for Paper Submission*

Abstracts of 1,000 - 1,200 words will be accepted for review. These may include any additional materials, such as images or tables. The text of your abstract must be anonymized for double blind peer review. Each abstract will be read by at least three reviewers. After a period of three weeks, authors will be notified of rejection, acceptance, or request for revision. The ensuing abstract revision period will be three weeks.

Full papers must be no more than ten pages (2600 words), exclusive of notes and bibliography. Each paper will be read by at least three reviewers. After a period of three weeks, authors will be notified of acceptance or request for revision. This revision period will also be three weeks. Please use the Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition, for matters of style, capitalization, spelling, and hyphenation. Citations should be Chicago style [Notes and Bibliography]. The Manual can be found here: http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html.

Guidelines for Creative Work and Technology Submission

Creative Work and Tech Submission Deadline: May 12

We will accept works including (but not limited to) software, technical systems ("low" or "hi"), images, objects, demos, film/video, poetry, performances, interventions, illustration, and more. Submissions should include a description of the project of 500 words or fewer and this supplementary submission form, saved as PDF. As appropriate, your submission may include an additional PDF of images or plans, or a URL to a website or video (under 3 minutes) documentation. The text of your abstract or project description must be anonymized for double blind peer review. Each description will be read by at least three reviewers.

Note that the conference cannot offer funding to help produce projects or to transport them. We will have exhibition space and staff to assist with installation; the conference program will include exhibition tours and demonstration periods, and we will publish online documentation of the exhibitions.

Submission

Submissions will be done using the /Open Conference System. /You will need to create an account with this conference before submitting your materials.//Please follow this link to initiate the process:

http://snta.m-iti.org/index.php/snta/snta/user/account

The submission for both papers and creative works submission is May 12, 2017.

Contemporary Developments on Media, Culture and Society: Argentina and Latin America.

November 03 2017 | Universidad de San Andrés in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Deadline: May 15 2017

http://meso.com.ar/congreso-anual/

Updated: April 09 2017

The conference, organized by The Center for the Study of Media and Society in Argentina (MESO).

This will be the third annual conference organized by MESO on the interactions between media, culture and society. For more information about the 2015 and 2016 events, please visit http://meso.com.ar/congreso-anual/. This third annual conference is sponsored by the Center for Global Culture and Communication at Northwestern University.

Submissions should contribute to ongoing conversations about media, culture, and society in empirical, theoretical or methodological ways. They might also broaden our knowledge about the relationship between media, culture, and society at the national and regional level. Articles may refer to different aspects of communication, media, and cultural goods and services in the areas of journalism, entertainment -cinema, theater, television, music, etc. - advertising and marketing, public relations, social media, and video games, among others.

Topics to be addressed include the following, among others:

· Transformations in content production

· Change in the use of media

· Innovation and technological change

· Finance and media sustainability

· State, government and civil society

· Regulation and public policies

· Political communication and electoral campaigns

· The role of users as content producers

To make a submission:

· Send an extended abstract of the article, with a minimum length of 500 words and a maximum length of 1000 words (excluding title and references). The document should also include the contact information and brief (no more than 75 words) biography of each author.

· Abstracts should be sent without exception as an attached file, in word format (.doc, .docx), and entitled "Last Name, Name - Medios y Sociedad 2017".

· The deadline for submission is May 15, 2017. Abstracts should be sent by email to mediosysociedad@udesa.edu.ar . The subject of the mail should be "Last Name, Name - Medios y Sociedad 2017".

A selection committee will evaluate the abstracts and the results will be notified to the authors on July 1, 2017.

Please write to mediosysociedad@udesa.edu.ar if you have any questions and/or need any further information.

SLSA: Out of Time

November 09 2017 to November 12 2017 | Tempe, AZ

Deadline: May 15 2017

http://litsciarts.org/slsa17/

Updated: April 09 2017

Welcome to the human and inhuman deserts of Arizona.

Arizona State University will host the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts. ASU is located in Tempe Arizona, about fifteen minutes from the Phoenix Airport. The range of interdisciplinary labs and centers and the beautiful November weather make this an ideal locale for the conference.

The SLSA 2017 theme will be “Out of Time,” and papers/panels on all SLSA-related topics are welcome. Some of the areas related to the conference theme include: Nonhuman temporalities, Species extinction, Life after humans, slow time, the long now, Time and Computing, Digital Temporalities, Bio-political Time, Time and Capital, and much more. All proposal abstracts for roundtables, panel sessions, contributed papers, and posters must be submitted by Wednesday, May 15, 2017 (midnight EDT). See Submissions for more information and the full CFP.

2017 international Summer School in Higher Education Research and Science Studies

October 09 2017 to October 13 2017 | University of Kassel, Germany

Deadline: June 16 2017

www.uni-kassel.de/go/summerschool2017

Updated: April 09 2017

The summer school "Boundaries in Science and Higher Education (Research)", organized by the International Centre for Higher Education Research Kassel (INCHER-Kassel).

Sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), the summer school aims at establishing a dialog among participants discussing, transcending and pushing forward the boundaries that cross science and higher education (research).

Please apply and – in case you would like to participate with a presentation or poster – submit an abstract (about one page) by June, 16th 2017 to summerschool@incher.uni-kassel.de. Letters of acceptance will be sent by July 3rd, 2017 as well as detailed information about the location, conference schedule and accommodation options.

Doctoral School of Social Studies of Science and Technology in Latin America

September 18 2017 to September 20 2017 | Universidad Nacional de Colombia

Deadline: September 18 2017

http://www.esocite.la/escuela/bogota2017

Updated: March 10 2017

En la Facutad de Ciencias Humanas de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, tendrá lugar entre el 19-21 de septiembre de 2017, el VIII Taller Latinoamericano de Jóvenes Investigadores en Ciencia, Tecnología y Sociedad, y la V Escuela Doctoral de Estudios Sociales y Políticos sobre la Ciencia y la Tecnología de ESOCITE (la Sociedad Latinoamericana en Estudios Sociales de la Ciencia y la Tecnología), en la que se buscará reunir a un colectivo de jóvenes investigadores e investigadoras (alrededor de 30) en fase avanzada de redacción de sus tesis, con sus directores de tesis e investigadores consolidados del campo disciplinar, con el objeto de debatir las preguntas y los diseños de investigación así como las metodologías aplicadas, los avances que ya han realizado en sus investigaciones y sus aportes al campo CTS y a las sociedades de la Región. Se pretende que los jóvenes tengan un espacio privilegiado en la formación de una comunidad científica, compartido con investigadores consolidados, con mayor trayectoria en el campo de los estudios sociales y políticos de la ciencia y la tecnología en el espacio iberoamericano. De manera especial, se espera poder incidir en la potenciación de las redes de conocimiento entre los investigadores y las instituciones públicas y privadas de I+D+I de la región, enfatizando la inserción y fortalecimiento de la Red CTS-Colombia en el campo disciplinar en la Región. Para esta convocatoria se considerará como jóvenes investigadores e investigadoras a estudiantes de doctorado avanzados de todos los países de América Latina (se aceptará a 25 como máximo) y a estudiantes de maestría avanzados de instituciones colombianas (se aceptará a cinco como máximo). El encuentro cuenta con el auspicio del Grupo de Trabajo CLACSO “Ciencia y sociedad: los usos sociales del conocimiento en América Latina y la inclusión social”. A continuación del Taller/Escuela la Facultad de Ciencias Humanas de la UNC realizará, en la misma sede, el II Coloquio Nacional ESOCITE con la participación de destacados académicos, al cual están todos los asistentes y participantes cordialmente invitados. La asistencia a este coloquio no tiene costo, pero el alojamiento y manutención correrá por cuenta de los interesados.
Comité Científico
Dra. Rosalba Casas, IIS-UNAM (México); Dr. Jorge Gibert, Universidad de Valparaíso, (Chile); Dr. Yuri Jack Gómez, Universidad Nacional (Colombia), Dr. Pablo Kreimer, Universidad Maimónides, (Argentina), Dra. Tania Pérez-Bustos, Universidad Nacional, (Colombia), Dra. Olga Restrepo, Universidad Nacional (Colombia), Dr. Ronny Viales, Universidad de Costa Rica; Dr. Irlan Von Linsingen, Universidad Federal de Santa Catarina, (Brasil).

8th Tensions of Europe Conference

September 07 2017 to September 10 2017 | Athens

Deadline: February 15 2017

http://8toe2017.phs.uoa.gr

Updated: December 08 2016

2nd Call for Papers: Borders and Technology. The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference will have as its main theme the history of borders and technology. We invite papers studying the history of the relationship between national borders and transnational infrastructures, hidden technological linking and delinking that reinforced or challenged border delineations and demarcations, the relationship between borders and technologically-induced environmental crises and disasters, the virtualization of borders and the territories that they contain through the use of electronic and related technologies, geopolitics and technology, the redefinition of borders due to the use of technology (and vice versa), all the way from the production to the circulation and use of goods and commodities. One central aim is to cross-fertilize between disciplines and we therefore invite contributions from a wide variety of historical disciplines as well as from fields like Migration and Border Studies, Migration History, Mobility History, etc, especially in connection to borders and migrations from, to and within Europe.

Themes that fall under the general agenda of the Tensions of Europe network are very welcomed (e.g. transnational histories of technology, history of European infrastructures and networks, environment and technology, the democracy-technology relationship, conflicting interests and technology, technology and hidden integration, technology and culture, gender and technology, technology and ethnicity, technology and disability).

Tensions of Europe has a long tradition of fostering alternative meeting formats. We encourage proposals for non-traditional sessions with different formats and new ideas (e.g. round tables, agenda-building sessions, brainstorm sessions, break-out groups with assignments, poster discussion, film discussion, event-based sessions). As long as quality can be demonstrated, the program committee will not prioritize between formats. By quality we mean suggestions that promise constructive, stimulating and engaging discussion.

The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference

September 07 2017 to September 10 2017 | Athens

Deadline: February 15 2017

http://8toe2017.phs.uoa.gr/

Updated: May 10 2016

Borders and Technology

The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference will have as its main theme the history of borders and technology. We invite papers studying the history of the relationship between national borders and transnational infrastructures, hidden technological linking and delinking that reinforced or challenged border delineations and demarcations, the relationship between borders and technologically-induced environmental crises and disasters, the virtualization of borders and the territories that they contain through the use of electronic and related technologies, geopolitics and technology, the redefinition of borders due to the use of technology (and vice versa), all the way from the production to the circulation and use of goods and commodities. One central aim is to cross-fertilize between disciplines and we therefore invite contributions from a wide variety of historical disciplines as well as from fields like Migration and Border Studies, Migration History, Mobility History, etc, especially in connection to borders and migrations from, to and within Europe.

Themes that fall under the general agenda of the Tensions of Europe network are very welcomed (e.g. transnational histories of technology, history of European infrastructures and networks, environment and technology, the democracy-technology relationship, conflicting interests and technology, technology and hidden integration, technology and culture, gender and technology, technology and ethnicity, technology and disability).

Tensions of Europe has a long tradition of fostering alternative meeting formats. We encourage proposals for non-traditional sessions with different formats and new ideas (e.g. round tables, agenda-building sessions, brainstorm sessions, break-out groups with assignments, poster discussion, film discussion, event-based sessions). As long as quality can be demonstrated, the program committee will not prioritize between formats. By quality we mean suggestions that promise constructive, stimulating and engaging discussion.

We invite scholars from all relevant fields to submit proposal to the website.
by 15 February 2017

All proposals should include a title, short abstract, the academic title and affiliation of the applicant(s) and a short bio. Please name your file with your surname. Abstracts for individual papers and posters should be no more than 300 words. For panels, we ask for a description of the theme of the panel (max 300 words) together with shorter abstracts (max 150 words) of the individual papers. If you wish to suggest a presentation of a different format, please use these word limits as guidelines. We will inform applicants by April 1st 2017 whether their contribution has been accepted. A second call for papers with information about keynote speakers will be distributed by the end of 2016. Conference website: http://8toe2017.phs.uoa.gr/

Welcome to Athens in September 2017!

Aristotle Tympas (Chair of the Organizing Committee)

Division of History of Science and Technology Department of Philosophy and History of Science School of Science National and Kapodistrian University of Athens

The Tensions of Europe conference is organized biennially. Tensions of Europe is an interdisciplinary community of scholars who study the shaping of Europe by paying attention to the role of technology and material culture. It welcomes fruitful interaction between historians of technology and scholars who study technology from all other fields of the humanities and the social sciences (http://www.tensionsofeurope.eu). The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference will be co-organized by the Division of History of Science and Technology, Department of Philosophy and History of Science, School of Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (http://www.phs.uoa.gr/hst/) and the Foundation for the History of Technology (http://www.histech.nl/www/en/), which is hosted by the Eindhoven University of Technology.

Institute for Advanced Studies

October 01 2016 to June 30 2017 | Graz, Austria

Deadline: December 31 2015

http://www.ias-sts.aau.at

Updated: November 06 2015

The IAS-STS in Graz, Austria, promotes the interdisciplinary investigation of the links and interactions between science, tech- nology and society, as well as technology assessment and research into the development and implementation of socially and

environmentally sound technologies. Broadly speaking, the IAS-STS is an institute for the enhancement of science, techno- logy and society studies. The IAS-STS invites researchers to apply for a stay between 1 October 2016 and 30 June 2017 as a

• Research Fellow (up to nine months); or, • Visiting Scholar (shorter period, e.g. a month).

The IAS-STS offers excellent research infrastructure. Close co-operation with researchers at the IFZ (Inter-University

Research Centre for Technology, Work and Culture), and the Graz unit of STS (Institute of Science, Technology and Society

Studies, Klagenfurt University), guest lectures, colloquia, workshops, and conferences provide an atmosphere of creativity

and scholarly discussion. Furthermore, we can offer five grants, worth EUR 940,- per month, for long-term Research Fellows

at the IAS-STS.

The Fellowship Programme 2016-2017 is dedicated to projects investigating the following issues:

1. Gender – Technology – Environment

This area of research particularly focuses on gender and queer dimensions in science and technology. On the one hand, individual

perspectives of actors in the technological field are taken into account; on the other hand, educational, organisational, societal, envi- ronmental, and political issues (e.g. queer ecology or environmental justice) are gaining more and more relevance. Queer perspectives

on STS are of special interest, including analyses of the reproduction of sexual binaries or reproductions of marginalized/hegemonic

positions and normalizations in and through science and technologies.

2. Life Sciences/Biotechnology

Applications are sought in two thematic areas: First, following some 20 years of public debate, agricultural biotechnology continues to be a

deeply controversial issue in the EU, partly fueled by progress in science and technology innovation such as GM industrial and energy crops,

or novel breeding techniques. Research should contribute to a better understanding of the regulatory, broader policy and governance

challenges of agricultural biotechnology, and/or explore strategies to manage these challenges. Second, in recent years, social studies of

the life sciences were bound to large scale research programmes. In many countries, these funding schemes have now come to an end.

This is an opportunity to review these previous programmes via collaborative engagement with the life sciences, as well as to explore new

ways of inquiry. Applicants are encouraged to address these issues when analysing the life sciences as a social process.

3. Sustainable and Innovative Public Procurement & Ecodesign

The supply side policy “Ecodesign”, and the demand side policy “Public Procurement” are used to support the transition towards

green, socially responsible and innovative markets. Nonetheless, scientific research in these respective fields is still limited. Re- searchers investigating the following areas are encouraged to apply: The environmental impact or the innovation potential of green

public procurement and “Ecodesign”; the impact of socially responsible public procurement; the hurdles, success factors, efficacy,

and wider implications of European or national policies for sustainable and innovative public procurement and “Ecodesign”.

4. Towards Low-Carbon Energy Systems

Based on analyses of social, technological and organisational frameworks of energy use, projects should contribute to the shaping

of sustainable energy, climate and technology policies. They should focus on socio-economic aspects of energy technologies or on

strategies of environmental technology policy. They should develop measures and strategies for the promotion of renewable energy

sources; for the transition to a sustainable energy system; or, contribute to the field of sustainable construction. Regional governance,

climate policy strategies, innovation policy, participation and the role of users are important themes. In addition, the Manfred Heindler

grant is awarded to research projects concerning the increased use of renewable energies and the more efficient use of energy.

5. Sustainable Food Systems

Food security, nutrition, food quality and safety, resource scarcity, carbon foot prints and other challenges faced in urban or rural

areas are currently dominating the industrialized and globalized food systems. Research applications exploring different forms of

sustainable food systems, as well as related social practices and socioeconomic/technical processes in the production, distribution,

marketing, and consumption of food are encouraged. A particular focus lies on governance mechanisms, policies, and their (potential)

contribution to a wider transformation towards more sustainable cities, regions and societies.

Applications must be submitted to the IAS-STS by 31 December 2015.

For application forms and further information:

Please visit our website: www.ias-sts.aau.at

Institute for Advanced Studies on Science, Technology and Society (IAS-STS)

Attn. Günter Getzinger • Kopernikusgasse 9 • 8010 Graz • Austria • E-mail: ias-sts@aau.at