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Society for Social Studies of Science

The STS Profession

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Please email items for the 4S “Profession” pages and the Technoscience Updates newsletter to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Items may be edited for length. Please include a URL for the complete and authoritative information.

The monthly deadline for inclusion in the newsletter is the 7th.

New Book, Cultures without Culturalism: The Making of Scientific Knowledge (2017, Duke U Press)

https://www.dukeupress.edu/cultures-without-culturalism

Updated: March 23 2017

Duke University Press is pleased to announce the publication of Cultures without Culturalism: The Making of Scientific Knowledge, edited by Karine Chemla and Evelyn Fox Keller.

This volume models a new path where historicized and cultural accounts of scientific practice retain their specificity and complexity without falling into the traps of cultural essentialism, examining issues that range from the history of quadratic equations in China to the studying of employment discrimination in the social sciences.

View the table of contents and find out more about the book here: https://www.dukeupress.edu/cultures-without-culturalism

2017 SHOT Dibner Award Nominations

Deadline: May 01 2017

http://www.historyoftechnology.org/about_us/awards/dibner.html

Updated: March 20 2017

The Society for the History of Technology (SHOT) seeks nominations for the 2017 Dibner Award to recognize excellence in museums and museum exhibits that interpret the history of technology, industry, and engineering to the general public. Nominations are due by 1 May 2017, and exhibits must have been open to the public for no more than 24 months before that date. Complete information is available at:
http://www.historyoftechnology.org/about_us/awards/dibner.html

One-year Postdoc position in STS at Virginia Tech (Falls Church, VA –– Washington, DC area)

Deadline: March 23 2017

http://listings.jobs.vt.edu/postings/74287

Updated: March 15 2017

The Department of Science and Technology in Society (STS), Virginia Tech at Falls Church, VA (Washington, DC area) invites applications for a one-year postdoctoral position for the academic year 2017/18. The successful candidate will work with Dr. Sonja Schmid and contribute to the NSF CAREER project "Globalizing Nuclear Emergency Response." Review of applications will start March 23 and continue until the position is filled.

New Master’s Program in STS at the Munich Center for Technology in Society

Deadline: May 31 2017

https://www.mcts.tum.de/en/master-programs/

Updated: March 15 2017

The Munich Center for Technology in Society (MCTS) of the TU Munich launched its new Master’s program in Science and Technology Studies (STS) last year. It is an English language program and free of tuition fees (as are almost all degree programs in Germany). The application is now possible until May 31, 2017.

Please forward this information to any students who might be interested in obtaining a Master’s in degree in Science and Technology Studies.

The STS Master’s Program at MCTS is empirical, interdisciplinary, reflexive and research oriented.

From bio-technology to energy transitions, from automated mobility to data security - the big challenges of today's’ societies are inseparably connected to scientific, technical and social questions. The Master’s program Science and Technology Studies will teach you how to reflexively research, develop problem-solving skills and critically intervene in the big sociotechnical issues of our time.

In the Master’s program you will learn:
empirical research methods and analytical skills to study the conditions and consequences of contemporary science and technology
interdisciplinary approaches to urgent questions about regulation, responsibility and sustainability of science and technology

Alongside the STS Master's program, we offer specializations in the Philosophy of Science and Technology or the History of Science and Technology.

The STS Master’s program is research oriented. The program prepares you for future academic research (such as a PhD), as well as careers in science and technology management, science communication and journalism, and in science funding and policy.

Studying the Master’s program STS will equip you to deal with the challenges and to embrace the opportunities of todays’ technologized societies.

Watch the video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=raWnTy9QDaA

Please Note:
The application platform for the new Master’s program is now open. The application period will close on May 31 2017.
If you are interested in the program or have any questions, please send an email to sts@mcts.tum.de.

More information is provided on our website: https://www.mcts.tum.de/en/master-programs/

New Book from Sal Restivo: Sociology, Science, and the End of Philosophy (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)

https://www.palgrave.com/de/book/9781349951598

Updated: March 14 2017

Sal Restivo (NYU), former 4S president, has published Sociology, Science, and the End of Philosophy: How Society Shapes Brains, Gods, Maths, and Logics (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017). This book (https://www.palgrave.com/de/book/9781349951598) offers a unique analysis of how ideas about science and technology in the public and scientific imaginations (in particular about maths, logics, genes, brains, gods, and robots) perpetuate the false reality that values and politics are separate from scientific knowledge and its applications. These ideas are reinforced by cultural myths about free will and individualism. The significance of this analysis reaches far beyond the realms of science and technology, and their sociological and political ramifications are of paramount importance in our global society.

In addition two earlier publications, Restivo's Red, Black and Objective: Science, Sociology, and Anarchism (2011) (https://www.routledge.com/Red-Black-and-Objective-Science-Sociology-and-Anarchism/Restivo/p/book/9781409410393); and Restivo, Weiss and Stingl's Worlds of ScienceCraft: New Horizons in Sociology, Philosophy, and Science Studies (2014) (https://www.routledge.com/Worlds-of-ScienceCraft-New-Horizons-in-Sociology-Philosophy-and-Science/Restivo-Weiss-Stingl/p/book/9781409445272) have been issued in paperback by Routledge (2016).

1st International Conference on Language, Data and Knowledge

June 19 2017 to June 20 2017 | http://www.ldk2017.org/

Deadline: February 23 2017

http://www.ldk2017.org/

Updated: March 10 2017

The new biennial conference series on Language, Data and Knowledge (LDK) aims at bringing together researchers from across disciplines concerned with the acquisition, curation and use of language data in the context of data science and knowledge-based applications. With the advent of the Web and digital technologies, an ever increasing amount of language data is now available across application areas and industry sectors, including social media, digital archives, company records, etc. The efficient and meaningful exploitation of this data in scientific and commercial innovation is at the core of data science research, employing NLP and machine learning methods as well as semantic technologies based on knowledge graphs

Language data is of increasing importance to machine learning-based approaches in NLP, Linked Data and Semantic Web research and applications that depend on linguistic and semantic annotation with lexical, terminological and ontological resources, manual alignment across language or other human-assigned labels. The acquisition, provenance, representation, maintenance, usability, quality as well as legal, organizational and infrastructure aspects of language data are therefore rapidly becoming major areas of research that are at the focus of the conference.

Knowledge graphs is an active field of research concerned with the extraction, integration, maintenance and use of semantic representations of language data in combination with semantically or otherwise structured data, numerical data and multimodal data among others. Knowledge graph research builds on the exploitation and extension of lexical, terminological and ontological resources, information and knowledge extraction, entity linking, ontology learning, ontology alignment, semantic text similarity, Linked Data and other Semantic Web technologies. The construction and use of knowledge graphs from language data, possibly and ideally in the context of other types of data, is a further specific focus of the conference.

A further focus of the conference is the combined use and exploitation of language data and knowledge graphs in data science-based approaches to use cases in industry, including biomedical applications, as well as use cases in humanities and social sciences.

The LDK conference has been initiated by a consortium of researchers from the Insight Centre for Data Analytics, InfAI (University Leipzig) and Wolfgang Goethe University and a Scientific Committee of leading researchers in Natural Language Processing, Linked Data and Semantic Web, Language Resources and Digital Humanities. LDK is endorsed by several international organisations: DBpedia, ACL SIGANN, Global Wordnet Association, CLARIN and Big Data Value Association (BDVA). The first edition, LDK 2017, will be held in Galway (Ireland) with a second edition planned for 2019 in Leipzig (Germany).

Important Dates

23 February 2017 Paper submission 30 March 2017 Notification 20 April 2017 Camera-ready submission 19-20 June 2017 Conference

Get the Picture. Digital Methods for Visual Research

June 26 2017 to July 11 2017 | University of Amsterdam

Deadline: May 05 2017

https://wiki.digitalmethods.net/Dmi/SummerSchool2017

Updated: March 10 2017

Gillian Rose employs the term visual methodologies for “researching with visual materials” (2016). Iconography, semiotics, framing analysis and multimodal analysis are among the approaches that may be applied to digital materials. One may also ask, does the online make a difference to the study of the visual? That is, with which approaches is the image considered primarily, or secondarily, as a digital object embedded in online media? Apart from the change in the setting of the object, there may also be methods that emerge from the new media, engines and platforms. What kinds of so-called ‘natively’ digital methods can be repurposed productively for visual analysis? How to make use of the Google’s reverse image search? More broadly, with the increasing focus on selfies and memes but also on Instagram stories, animated gifs, filters, stickers and emoticons, social media and digital communications are pushing for a visual turn in the study of digital culture. Such a push invites visual analysis into the realm of digital studies, too. One may begin to open the discussion of interplay by examining the new outputs such as journalists’ data visualisations as well as policy-makers’ dashboards like the open data city platforms.

One may similarly compare visual literacies. Are there new ways of interpreting images through data, both substantively (which are the related materials?) and temporally (how do they develop over time? do they resonate? are they memes?). In digital methods, the image is not only a research object but also a research device. Making images “that can be seen and manipulated” (Venturini, Jacomy & Pereira 2015) enables scholars to access and actively explore datasets. How to make them and read them? At the same time, the technical properties of digital images both in terms of their color, resolution, and timestamp, as well as their ‘networkedness’, traceability and resonance, become available for research, allowing one to think with images (as visual guides and narratives) as well as through them (as data objects). Novel visual methodologies then emerge.

There is the ‘active’ data visualisation, which includes research protocol diagrams, data dashboards, visual network analysis, and issue mapping. Protocol diagrams (Figure 1) guide analysts, programmers and designers through their collaborative research project. Data dashboards offer a visual aid for data metrics and analytics, in side-by-side graphs and tables; or become critical tools (as in the People’s Dashboard ). Visual network analysis offers a way into data that can be engaged with and requires an active research attitude (Venturini, Jacomy & Pereira 2015). Issue mapping renders legible the actors and substance of a (possibly controversial) issue (Rogers, Sánchez-Querubín & Kil 2015). In a second group of approaches, the image is treated as a digitised or natively digital object of study. This includes visual and cultural analytics, which provide distant visual reading techniques to explore and plot visual objects such as selfies and websites based on their formal properties (Manovich 2014; Ben-David, Amram & Bekkerman 2016). Networked visual content analysis, in which images may be queried ‘in reverse’ to study their circulation, can be used to critically assess questions of representation and cultural standing (Figure 2). Another group of approaches repurpose visual formats, where more playful explorations appropriate (and tweak) the templates and visual aesthetics of the web, creating research GIFs and critical social media profiles (Figure 3). In this 10th Digital Methods Summer School we will explore and expand such digital methods for visual research, and critically inquire into their proposed epistemologies. We look forward to welcoming you to Amsterdam in the Summertime! Summer School Philosophy The Digital Methods Summer School is exploratory and experimental.

It is not a setting for ‘just’ tool training or for principally tool-driven research. Substantive research projects are conceived and carried out. Participants are encouraged to ‘span time with their issue’ and the materials. In other words, we heed Alexander Galloway’s admonition about data and tool-driven work: “Those who were formerly scholars or experts in a certain area are now recast as mere tool users beholden to the affordances of the tool — while students spend ever more time mastering menus and buttons, becoming literate in a digital device rather than a literary corpus” (Galloway 2014:127). We encourage device and corpus literacy! The device training we ask you to do prior to the Summer School through online tutorials, and at the Summer School itself, in a kind of flipped learning environment (if you'll excuse the overused phrase), we would like to believe that you have familiarised yourself already with the tools and completed the tutorials available online. During the Summer School we will discuss and tinker with the nitty-gritty, aim to invent new methods, techniques and heuristics and create the first iterations of compelling work to be shared. About Digital Methods as a Concept Digital methods is a term coined as a counterpoint to virtual methods, which typically digitize existing methods and port them onto the Web. Digital methods, contrariwise, seek to learn from the methods built into the dominant devices online, and repurpose them for social and cultural research.

That is, the challenge is to study both the info-web as well as the social web with the tools that organize them. There is a general protocol to digital methods. At the outset stock is taken of the natively digital objects that are available (links, tags, threads, etc.) and how devices such as search engines make use of them. Can the device techniques be repurposed, for example by remixing the digital objects they take as inputs? Once findings are made with online data, where to ground them? Is the baseline still the offline, or are findings to be grounded in more online data? Taking up these questions more theoretically (but also practically) there is also a Digital Methods book (MIT Press, 2013) as well as a complementary Issue Mapping book (Amsterdam University Press, 2015), and other digital methods publications .

Intersecting Processes

May 27 2017 to May 30 2017 | Old Fire Station, Woods Hole MA

Deadline: March 31 2017

http://bit.ly/NewSSCa

Updated: March 10 2017

New England Workshop on Science and Social Change
(*a limited number can participate from a distance via google+ hangout)

In this four-day workshop participants will create spaces, interactions, and support in formulating plans to extend our own projects of inquiry and engagement around "intersecting processes." Taylor and García Barrios (1995; following Wolf 1982, 387 ) introduced the term to capture the ways that social and environmental change involves processes operating at different spatial and temporal scales and drawing on elements as diverse as the local climate and geo-morphology, social norms, work relations, and national political economic policy. Such intersecting processes are interlinked in the production of any outcome and in their own on-going transformation. An equivalent picture fits the changing structures we face in many areas, such as biomedicine and epidemiology, agriculture and ecological restoration, political economy and mental illness, science and social theory, project-based learning and fostering creativity. To understand such complexity requires our attention to the ways the intersecting processes transgress boundaries and restructure “internal” dynamics, thus ensuring that the situations do not have clearly defined boundaries and are not simply governed by coherent, internally driven dynamics. Engaging with such complexity invites agents to link "transversally" across different kinds of agents and scale, not to focus on one class or place or dynamic.

Activities during the workshop will, as they have at NewSSC since 2004, build on what the particular group of participants contribute and employ a range of tools and processes for "connecting, probing, and reflecting" so as to support and learn from each others' inquiries. The workshop format, in brief, includes an activity together as a group each morning and again for an hour at the end of the day. In between, time is spent in independent research related to the workshop topic, in conversations, and in other pursuits that participants find helpful for advancing our projects. The intended outcomes include: a) products that reflect our inquiries and plans, conveyed in work-in-progress presentations (10-15 minutes) and revised in response to feedback so as to be shared outside the workshop, b) experiences that motivate us to take our individual projects beyond their current scope or level of activity, and c) stock-taking towards developing the workshop format. This year, with a view to assembling and distributing a collective product that can engage and influence wider audiences, the expectation of a shareable product is emphasized. In this spirit, travel subsidies will be guaranteed for participants who submit a draft working paper in advance and revise it by the end of the workshop. Applications are sought from teachers, researchers, graduate students, and activists who are interested in facilitating discussion, reflection, avid learning, and clarifying one's identity and affinities in relation to the workshop topic. The workshop format allows for a limited number of participants over the internet. Newcomers and return participants are welcome.

Registration is on a sliding scale--$125 (for those with low incomes and lack of travel support) up to $300 (for those with a decent income and institutional/grant support). Registration covers meal costs, but not accommodation, which is at a local, moderately priced motel. The funding available to help get people to the workshop is modest, but we have managed to subsidize travel and accommodation in past years according to need (which favors graduate students and independent scholars). Online participant registration is on a sliding scale: $50 - $125. Some funding support may be supplied by The Pumping Station. For an extra charge, 1-3 graduate credits are available for workshop participation and completion of a related project.

Applications via http://bit.ly/NewSSCa (Spaces still available as of 3/6/17) For more details, see http://sicw.wikispaces.com/newsscarrangements Participants should talk to the organizer or assistant before the workshop to explore ideas for developing projects making good use of the workshop format. Organizer: Peter J. Taylor, University of Massachusetts Boston, Science in a Changing World graduate track, http://www.cct.umb.edu/sicw

Doctoral School of Social Studies of Science and Technology in Latin America

September 18 2017 to September 20 2017 | Universidad Nacional de Colombia

Deadline: September 18 2017

http://www.esocite.la/escuela/bogota2017

Updated: March 10 2017

En la Facutad de Ciencias Humanas de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, tendrá lugar entre el 19-21 de septiembre de 2017, el VIII Taller Latinoamericano de Jóvenes Investigadores en Ciencia, Tecnología y Sociedad, y la V Escuela Doctoral de Estudios Sociales y Políticos sobre la Ciencia y la Tecnología de ESOCITE (la Sociedad Latinoamericana en Estudios Sociales de la Ciencia y la Tecnología), en la que se buscará reunir a un colectivo de jóvenes investigadores e investigadoras (alrededor de 30) en fase avanzada de redacción de sus tesis, con sus directores de tesis e investigadores consolidados del campo disciplinar, con el objeto de debatir las preguntas y los diseños de investigación así como las metodologías aplicadas, los avances que ya han realizado en sus investigaciones y sus aportes al campo CTS y a las sociedades de la Región. Se pretende que los jóvenes tengan un espacio privilegiado en la formación de una comunidad científica, compartido con investigadores consolidados, con mayor trayectoria en el campo de los estudios sociales y políticos de la ciencia y la tecnología en el espacio iberoamericano. De manera especial, se espera poder incidir en la potenciación de las redes de conocimiento entre los investigadores y las instituciones públicas y privadas de I+D+I de la región, enfatizando la inserción y fortalecimiento de la Red CTS-Colombia en el campo disciplinar en la Región. Para esta convocatoria se considerará como jóvenes investigadores e investigadoras a estudiantes de doctorado avanzados de todos los países de América Latina (se aceptará a 25 como máximo) y a estudiantes de maestría avanzados de instituciones colombianas (se aceptará a cinco como máximo). El encuentro cuenta con el auspicio del Grupo de Trabajo CLACSO “Ciencia y sociedad: los usos sociales del conocimiento en América Latina y la inclusión social”. A continuación del Taller/Escuela la Facultad de Ciencias Humanas de la UNC realizará, en la misma sede, el II Coloquio Nacional ESOCITE con la participación de destacados académicos, al cual están todos los asistentes y participantes cordialmente invitados. La asistencia a este coloquio no tiene costo, pero el alojamiento y manutención correrá por cuenta de los interesados.
Comité Científico
Dra. Rosalba Casas, IIS-UNAM (México); Dr. Jorge Gibert, Universidad de Valparaíso, (Chile); Dr. Yuri Jack Gómez, Universidad Nacional (Colombia), Dr. Pablo Kreimer, Universidad Maimónides, (Argentina), Dra. Tania Pérez-Bustos, Universidad Nacional, (Colombia), Dra. Olga Restrepo, Universidad Nacional (Colombia), Dr. Ronny Viales, Universidad de Costa Rica; Dr. Irlan Von Linsingen, Universidad Federal de Santa Catarina, (Brasil).

The World Congress of Sociology

July 15 2017 to July 21 2017 | Toronto, Canada

Deadline: March 15 2017

http://www.isa-sociology.org/en/conferences/world-congress/toronto- 2018/guidelines-for-program-coordinators/

Updated: March 10 2017

RC 23 (Sociology of Science and Technology) encourages you to organize a session at the upcoming World Congress. All topics relevant to the sociology of science and technology are appropriate. However, given the restricted number of session slots allocated to the RC, organizers are encouraged to avoid excessively narrow topics. To facilitate inclusion of as many individuals as possible, the Co-coordinators intend to include a variety of session formats. For additional details on potential session formats.

History & Pedagogy of Mathematics

March 31 2017 to April 02 2017 | Philadelphia, PA

Deadline: March 01 2017

http://www.hpm-americas.org/upcoming/

Updated: March 10 2017

The Americas Section of the International Study Group on the Relations Between the History and Pedagogy of Mathematics (HPM-Americas) is pleased to announce a meeting from Friday, March 31, to Sunday, April 2, 2017, at the campus of the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia.

We seek a variety of talks on relations between the history and pedagogy of mathematics. At this meeting we hope to feature a special session on the history and pedagogy of mathematics in engineering. We encourage submissions of paper proposals in this area.

Talks will be about 25 minutes long, followed by abundant time for discussion.

Abstracts of proposed talks need to be received by March 1, 2017. They can either be submitted via this website or sent to Dave Roberts at robertsdl@aol.com.

Travelling Codes Workshop MECS Luneburg

March 30 2017 to March 31 2017 | Luneburg, Germany

Deadline: March 29 2017

http://www.leuphana.de/dfg-programme/mecs/veranstaltungen/traveling-codes-2017.html

Updated: March 10 2017

Programme Please have a look at the attached programme or visit the website.

Keynote by Matthias Heymann (Aarhus)

Talks by Paul N. Edwards (Michigan), Hélène Guillemot (Paris), Simon Hirsbrunner (Siegen), Antonia Walford (Copenhagen), Catharina Landström (Oxford), Helge Peters (Oxford), Ronlyn Duncan (Lincoln) & Marc Tadaki (British Columbia), Isabell Schrickel (Luneburg)

Registration To register, please send an email to mecs@leuphana.de

Topic of the workshop Environmental science and, in particular, climate science is a highly international and interdisciplinary endeavor aiming at global coverage of environmental changes in long-term trends, and at global projections of possible future developments. However, current developments in both climate science and politics question the focus on the globality of the ‘vast machine’ which climate science has become (Edwards, 2010), as calls have intensified for new forms of regional and local knowledge about the effects of climate change and efforts to tackle them, for instance in the form of regional ‘climate services‘.

Against this background, this workshop seeks to use the metaphor of ‘traveling code‘ to make sense of what happens when climate science travels – whether in the form of mobile scientific tools, models, and software codes, circulating data sets and standards, or prominent artifacts like scientific images, knowledge claims or numerical targets. These forms and instances of traveling code encounter diverse cultural and political contexts which, on the one hand, involve a multitude of scientists, politicians, and citizens, with every community arguably incorporating and adapting the ‘codes’ of climate science differently. On the other hand, we may observe universalizing effects of ‘traveling codes’ – the smoothing of epistemic landscapes and the globalisation of scientific practice. This tension, between what we might call ‘localisation‘ and ‘globalisation‘, is of core interest for the workshop, along with the question of how exactly these ‘codes’ travel –through which social and media technologies– between different disciplines and knowledge cultures. What are the software codes, models, standards, data sets and images, the artifacts of climate science, that help us to understand and increasingly shape our world and future, and how have they migrated from their sites of production to new sites of application and interpretation?

Organised by Gabriele Gramelsberger (MECS | Leuphana and University Witten/Herdecke) Isabell Schrickel (CCP | CGSC) | Leuphana) Martin Mahony (School of Geography | University of Nottingham)

Additional programme on Saturday // 2017 April, 1 11:00-14:00 The Paris Agreement – Eine Lesung (in German); public reading performance of the Paris Agreement with citizens of Lüneburg, venue: Rathaus (town hall of Luneburg)

Visiting Assistant Professor, Science in Society Program, Wesleyan University

https://careers.wesleyan.edu/postings/5780

Updated: March 09 2017

The Science in Society Program at Wesleyan University invites applications for a one-year visiting faculty position at the assistant professor level with expertise in transnational studies of science and technology and in related empirical methods. Responsibilities include teaching core courses in socio-cultural studies of science and technology and upper level courses in area of expertise, and contributing to academic advising of majors. The visitor course load is five courses (3/2) per academic year. Candidates should have a Ph.D. in hand by July 1, 2017. Wesleyan has a strong commitment to both scholarship and undergraduate teaching. The appointment will begin September 1, 2017.

Wesleyan University, located in Middletown, Connecticut, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religious creed, age, gender, gender identity or expression, national origin, marital status, ancestry, present or past history of mental disorder, learning disability or physical disability, political belief, veteran status, sexual orientation, genetic information or non-position-related criminal record. We welcome applications from women and historically underrepresented minority groups. Inquiries regarding Title IX, Section 504, or any other non-discrimination policies should be directed to: Antonio Farias, VP for Equity & Inclusion, Title IX and ADA/504 Officer, 860-685-4771, afarias@wesleyan.edu

Apply online via https://careers.wesleyan.edu/postings/5780

You will be asked to upload electronic versions of the items we require, which are (1) a cover letter of application, (2) a curriculum vitae, (3) a research statement (4) information regarding teaching which may include teaching statement; syllabi, and teaching evaluations, (5) and writing samples not to exceed 50 pp. As part of the teaching statement, we invite you to describe your experiences engaging a diverse student body and (6) the email addresses of three referees from whom we may obtain confidential letters of recommendation.

Call for Nominations, 2017 National Medal of Science

Deadline: April 07 2017

https://www.nsf.gov/od/nms/medal.jsp

Updated: March 06 2017

Nominations are now being accepted for the National Medal of Science. The National Medal of Science was established by the 86th Congress in 1959 as a Presidential Award to be given to individuals "deserving of special recognition by reason of their outstanding contributions to knowledge in the physical, biological, mathematical, or engineering sciences." In 1980 Congress expanded this recognition to include the social and behavioral sciences. For details about the nomination process and the selection criteria please visit https://www.nsf.gov/od/nms/medal.jsp

Instructional Staff for “Science, Technology, and Public Policy,” Johns Hopkins CTY @ Princeton

Updated: February 27 2017

Deadline: Open until filled

Positions: Teaching Assistant and Instructor

Location: The course is offered at the Princeton University summer site of Johns Hopkins CTY

Session Dates: June 22 - July 15, 2017

This course is offered to talented high school students who come to our 3-week summer program. Classes are held daily from 9:00AM 3:00PM, and then 7:00– 9:00PM with breaks for activities/lunch/dinner (total 7 hours of teaching per day).

Some course work in policy making is required for TA position. Graduate level course work and independent teaching experience is required for instructor position.

More information about the course can be found here: Science, Technology, and Public Policy,” http://cty.jhu.edu/summer/grades7-12/princeton/catalog/courses.html#spub

More about instructor position can be found here http://cty.jhu.edu/jobs/summer/positions/residential/instructor.html.

More about TA position can be found here http://cty.jhu.edu/jobs/summer/positions/residential/teaching_assistant.html

Apply online via: http://cty.jhu.edu/jobs/summer/apply/index.html

Please contact: mali@jhu.edu for more information.

Lecturer in Social Science for 2017-18, Arizona State University

Deadline: April 12 2017

https://cisa.asu.edu/jobs

Updated: February 23 2017

The Social Science faculty in the College of Integrative Sciences and Arts on the Polytechnic Campus at Arizona State University invites applications for a Lecturer for the 2017-2018 academic year. The successful candidate will provide social scientific instruction on the relationships between science, and society. Course assignments may be at the graduate and/or undergraduate levels, and may occur in a variety of modalities (online, on ground, hybrid), on the Polytechnic campus. In addition to a typical course load of four (4) courses a semester, the successful candidate will also be expected to participate in service to the institution and profession as appropriate. Course load is determined by the faculty head. This is a full-time, benefits-eligible, non-tenure eligible position renewable on an academic year basis contingent upon satisfactory performance, availability of resources, and the needs of the university. Salary is competitive commensurate with experience. Candidate must reside in Arizona, or be willing to relocate.

Required Qualifications:
- Terminal degree in any Social Science Discipline, with emphasis or interest in Science and Society Studies broadly defined
- Evidence of professional interest in Science and Society Studies
- Evidence of teaching effectiveness

Desired Qualifications:
- Evidence of teaching online and in-person
- Experience in course management systems such as Blackboard and online homework systems
- Experience working in a collaborative environments within and across disciplines
- Excellent verbal and written communication skills
- Two (2) or more years of teaching experience at the undergraduate level
- Experience in the design of lecture curriculum using innovative teaching techniques and modes of delivery
- Demonstrated service to the profession

Application Procedure:
To apply, visit https://cisa.asu.edu/jobs and upload your application as one combined .pdf document under job number 11908. Only
electronic submissions will be reviewed. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Applications must contain:

1. A letter of interest outlining qualifications and experience as it relates to the position
2. Curriculum vitae
3. One-page statement of teaching philosophy
4. Evidence of teaching effectiveness
5. Information for three professional references (their position, title, e-mail, phone number)

The application deadline is 04/12/2017 at 5pm; and if not filled, then every Friday thereafter until the search is closed. Official
Transcripts required prior to first day of employment. A background check is required prior to employment. For technical assistance
with your application contact cisajobs@asu.edu, for position-related questions contact Search Committee Chair Dr. Keith Hollinger at
keith.hollinger@asu.edu

Arizona State University is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants
will be considered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other basis
protected by law. (See ASU's complete non-discrimination statement at https://asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd401.html; see ASU’s Title
IX policy at https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/)

Two research fellows in Soc of Science/STS, Centre for Ethics and Law in the Life Sciences (CELLS)

Deadline: March 15 2017

https://www.uni-hannover.de/en/aktuell/stellenangebote/jobboerse/detail/luhjobs/1380/

Updated: February 23 2017

The Centre for Ethics and Law in the Life Sciences (CELLS) is pleased to invite applications for two positions as research fellows in sociology of science / STS. For details please refer to:

https://www.uni-hannover.de/en/aktuell/stellenangebote/jobboerse/detail/luhjobs/1380/ (English)
https://www.uni-hannover.de/de/aktuell/stellenangebote/jobboerse/detail/luhjobs/1380/ (German)

New Book: Landmarks in the History of Science (Vernon Press, 2017)

https://vernonpress.com/title?id=229

Updated: February 10 2017

by Basil Evangelidis
Leiden University, Netherlands
ISBN: 9781622732005

Landmarks in the History of Science is a concise history of science from a global and macro-historical standpoint. It is an account of grand theoretical revolutions, such as heliocentrism, atomism, and relativity. But, more importantly, it is also a story of the methodological transitions to the experimental, mathematical, constructivist and instrumental practices of science.

It begins with Ancient Greek science, as one of the first self-conscious, comprehensive and well-documented scientific endeavors at the global level. The numerous contributions of the Greeks, in philosophy, mathematics, geometry, geography and astronomy, momentous as they were, were fruits of leisure rather than industry. It then examines the history of science in China and China’s exchanges with India and Islam. A systematic and collaborative scientific effort is the hallmark of Chinese science. The contributions of the Chinese in medicine, printing, manufacturing and navigation invariably predate and outshine those of western contemporaries.

Attention then shifts to the age of oceanic discoveries, which created the inexorable presuppositions for the genesis of global trade and a world system. From the inner organs of the organisms to the outer regions of Earth, Renaissance science was ubiquitous. The importance of inter-cultural scientific syncretism is highlighted, with the Iberian Peninsula as meeting point and crossroad of mutual affection between Arab, Jewish and European culture. Discoveries and inventions in metallurgy, electromagnetism and the science of petroleum set the scientific basis for the industrial revolution. The logic of the industrial revolution dictates developments in information technologies that culminate with the invention of modern computers. A dedicated chapter on the history of modern scientific conceptions of the universe showcases the subtle links in the fabric of seminal ideas in physics and astronomy. The book concludes with some reflections on the relationship between philosophy and the history of science. Following Kuhn and Latour, this discussion centers on the characteristics of continuities, ruptures and paradigmatic transitions in science.

4S members receive a 12% discount over the list price via by using coupon FLYPR12 at checkout.

New Book: Why Democracies Need Science - by Harry Collins & Robert Evans (Polity, 2017)

http://politybooks.com/bookdetail/?isbn=9781509509607

Updated: February 09 2017

Why Democracies Need Science
By Harry Collins & Robert Evans
Polity, 2017

- Offers a strong defence of science as a privileged and authoritative voice in social and political life
- Argues that social studies of science have gone too far in reducing scientific conclusions to context-dependent social constructions, or ‘politics in disguise’
- Proposes a reconciliation of sides in the ‘science vs. democracy’ debates, showing how science can still be valued without taking power out of elected hands
- Written by two leading authors in these debates whose work has been tremendously influential in ongoing discussions of science’s role in society


"Scientific and technological advances have a huge impact on our lives, yet science and society have an ambivalent relationship: science needs democracy to flourish but its techniques are beyond political accountability. In this thought-provoking book, Collins and Evans assert that “science gives substance to the way of being of democracy”. Consequently, science is a key to achieving and safeguarding our democratic ideals."
- Barry Barish, Linde Professor of Physics, Emeritus, Caltech; PI and Director of LIGO, 1994–2005

"Free-market ideology threatens both science and democracy. Collins and Evans respond not with philosophical arguments but an appeal to common sense. They ask us first to see that we face a basic moral choice, and then to choose the values of modern science. A provocative and thoughtful book."
- Mark Brown, Professor of Government, California State University, Sacramento

Special Issue: The National as Global, the Global as National: Citizenship Education in the Context

Deadline: February 28 2017

Updated: February 08 2017

Special Issue Editors: Wai-Chi Chee (The University of Hong Kong) Cori Jakubiak (Grinnell College) Citizenship education involves “efforts of societies and social groups to educate their members to imagine their social belonging and exercise their participation as (democratic) citizens” (Levinson 2011:284). This is particularly complicated in the context of migration and globalization because such notions as “members,” “belonging,” and “citizens” are highly contestable.

Central to the question is what determines who counts as a “member” or “citizen.” To unravel these complexities, this special issue studies and theorizes the mechanisms of the construction of citizen identities both within and beyond classroom against the backdrop of migration and globalization. This call invites papers (8000 words) of ethnographic work in education that focus on theorizations on notions of citizenship and the intersections/contestations between citizenship and globalization. We welcome research that engages with current policy, such as the international obsession with the link between global citizenship and the prevention of violent extremism, the unfair treatment of refugees, the nationalized xenophobia and anti-immigrant, anti-refugee dynamics looking beyond the western world, where internal migration results in serious disparities and injustices. We encourage submissions from scholars at different stages in their careers, and from researchers whose research spans anthropology, sociology, education and human geography.

Submission Procedures Editors of the Anthropology & Education Quarterly have expressed preliminary interest in publishing a special issue on ethnographic work on this topic. If you are interested in submitting a paper proposal for consideration, please send us (1) an abstract (500-700 words) that includes a short bibliography, information on research methodology and significance of the paper for advancing the field; and (2) a short bio of the author (200 words). Paper proposals should be emailed to Wai-chi Chee (wcchee@hku.hk) and Cori Jakubiak (jakubiak@grinnell.edu) by 28 February 2017. Please note “AEQ Citizenship Education” in the email subject line. Deadline for submission of abstracts: 28 February 2017 Successful authors informed: 31 March 2017 Deadline for submission of papers: 30 June 2017 All papers will be subject to double-blind review. AEQ editors will make final decision regarding publication.

Call for proposals Interdisciplinary Science Reviews (1976—)

http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/yisr20

Updated: February 08 2017

Background: the journal

Interdisciplinary Science Reviews (ISR) is a quarterly journal that aims to set contemporary and historical developments in the natural and social sciences, engineering and technology into their social and cultural contexts and to illumine their interrelations with the humanities and arts. Much more is said about ISR's intellectual project in an editorial that appeared in the journal at the beginning of last year. I attach it, below.

Most of ISR's issues are devoted to specific though wide-ranging themes; approximately one issue per year is for unsolicited essays. Examples of the thematic issues from the recent past are the Two Cultures Debate (41.2-3), Software and Scholarship (40.4), Theatre and Science (39.3), Master and Servant in Technoscience (37.4) and Computational Picturing (37.1). In 2010 ISR devoted a double-issue to the work of the historian of ancient science G.E.R Lloyd (35.3-4, freely downloadable). It included an essay by Lloyd, "History and human nature", to which 15 colleagues responded. For 2018 a similar double-issue on the work of anthropologist Tim Ingold is currently underway.

The thematic issues are guest-edited; some of them take on a life of their own and become reference points in the fields they address.

The call: Interdisciplinary Engineering

On behalf of ISR allow me to issue this call for proposals, in the first instance on the topic of engineering with the emphasis on knowing through making and on world-building. Computationally orientated contributions would be welcome, but the aim should be to include a wide range of philosophical, historical, biological and anthropological disciplines. Hands-on, embodied, motile, experimental and exploratory perspectives would be most welcome.

Whatever our academic paymasters may say, editing such an issue offers a significant opportunity -- as well as a not insignificant amount of work. Experience suggests, however, that such burdens are light.

ISR is completely booked until late 2019, so there is time to find contributors, negotiate with them and manage their submissions. If you are interested please write to me. A proposal should be no more than 2 pages in length. Kindly include a c.v. or URL. I will answer preliminary enquiries promptly.

Call for Reviewers

https://vernonpress.com/proposal?id=2&uid=a172342947d9d2be39937e1e90524c49

Updated: February 08 2017

Do you enjoy reading books in economics, social science, humanities? Join our community of book reviewers!

To join you must be an expert in one of the areas we publish ( https://vernonpress.com/ ) and be prepared to review at least one book every two years: Vernon Press - Independent publisher of academic books in ... vernonpress.com Publisher of peer reviewed and critically-acclaimed books in the social sciences and the humanities.

Benefits of joining

* Get to read and keep carefully pre-selected works, including cutting-edge research. * Help fellow scholars develop their work into high-standard, high-impact contributions and be acknowledged for it. * Get advance notice of exciting publication opportunities, occasional competitions and prize draws. * First-time reviewers receive a small honorarium ($50) and deep discount on other titles. * Experienced scholars may propose new series and receive additional benefits for their role as Editors (subject to publisher approval). * Young scholars receive support from the publisher and fellow community members and gain valuable experience in the process of peer review. To join please send a brief message expressing interest to: reviewers.community@vernonpress.com. In your message please mention your full name, academic affiliation, area(s) of expertise, and provide either a paragraph-long biographical note (and/)or a list of publications.

More detailed information on this call at the link.

Data Publics

March 31 2017 to April 02 2017 | Lancaster University

Deadline: January 22 2017

http://www.datapublics.net

Updated: February 08 2017

The name selected is The Public” *(John Dewey, 1927). There is a tension between how “publics” form spontaneously (for example in response to economic hardship, to create support groups, to protest about particular matters of concern) and how online users with similar consumption, browsing, movement patterns become grouped and acted upon as units of data, whether by organisations, researchers, or others. When people collectively and publicly self-organise to form a group, the identity of participants as well as the collective grouping itself may be apparent to all involved.

However, with the rise, across a range of fields of digital and algorithmic technologies that work by segmenting people according to shared sets of interests, objectives, behavioural traits, and/or political persuasions, these processes as well as the identities of participants tends to be invisible to those involved. In the latter, it is only when these acts of ‘assigned’ collectivisation are exposed, perhaps deliberately (e.g. when confronting published research), perhaps unexpectedly (e.g. via data hacks/leaks), or perhaps when group self-recognition is achieved by users (e.g. via transparency apps/tools, social media, activism, freedom of information requests), that those involved begin to recognise their status as a “public”. This conference will investigate the diverse ways in which data-mediated publics are, and can be, constituted, provoked, threatened, understood, and represented. This includes examining the role played in the formation of publics by new on- and offline infrastructures, data visualisations, social and economic practices, research methods and creative practices, and emerging and future technologies. Specifically, the event will facilitate cross-cutting conversations between designers, social scientists and creative technologists to explore the new challenges and opportunities afforded by thinking and working with “Data Publics”.

This conference will be inherently interdisciplinary and as such we seek contributions from researchers within the areas of social science, design, new media art, data visualisation, and human-computer interaction. It will take place over three days, and will comprise a combination of hands-on workshops, paper presentations and an exhibition of work. Day one will provide hands-on introductions to key methods for investigating data publics, involving two workshops running in parallel. One workshop – ‘Digital Methods/Data Visualisation’, led by David Moats – will introduce the digital methods and data visualisation approaches that can be used to conduct research in this field. The other – ‘Strategies, Tools and Participatory Processes’, led by Clara Crivellaro – will explore the practicalities of using design strategies, tools and participatory socio-technical processes to support the emergence and formation of publics.

The day will end with participants from the two workshops entering into dialogue. Following the workshops, the next two days will feature a mixture of academic paper presentations and exhibits from participants, with a focus throughout on the way a diverse array of methods, analytical approaches, representational techniques and practical engagements might be related to one another, put in conversation and combined. Participants are warmly invited to presents digital artefacts, data-visualisations or performances alongside their academic work or as stand-alone pieces that explore the topic of data-publics. For participation in the conference, we seek two forms of contributions: full papers and works to exhibit.

*CALL FOR ABSTRACTS AND EXHIBITS* We seek either (a) abstracts for papers or (b) descriptions of exhibits that each engage with the formation, relevance, and effects of “Data Publics ”. We invite contributions from professionals, scholars, designers, artists, activists, and those in other related fields, working in areas including but not limited to sociology, anthropology, geography, digital methods, interaction design, datavisualisation, human-computer interaction, and art. The deadline for submission is *January 22nd, 2017*. Contributions should address at least one of the following three themes: *1. Digital Economies / The Effects of Data Publics* ● What are the social, economic, ethical (and other) implications of emerging and future data publics? ● How are data-oriented publics constituted, including in relation to digital economies? ● Through which registers of everyday experience (e.g. as associated with making financial decisions, seeking emotional support, campaigning for change) do individuals participate in such publics? *2. Emergence and Complexity / The Behaviours of Data Publics* ● How do different conditions (e.g. social, technological, affective) impact the emergence of data-oriented publics? ● What new design paradigms are enabled with large-scale data publics? ● How might we better conceptualise and work with complex data publics? ● How are new technologies affecting the shape/direction of data publics ? *3. Methods / Interactions and interventions with Data Publics* ● How can we intervene in the formation, stabilisation, destabilisation, and transformation of publics? What role might such methods/creative practices themselves play in the constitution of data publics? ● What forms of creative practice/visualisation/interaction design/human-computer interaction are needed to engage with data publics and to either support the emergence of or sustain such publics? ● What (new/existing/combination of) methods/tools are required to study/shape the emergence/fate of data publics?

*HOW TO SUBMIT* *Those interested in participating in the conference* should submit either a paper abstract including 5-10 indicative references, or a description of the work to be exhibited including, if relevant, a maximum of 5 illustrative images and an additional description of any technical/spatial requirements the exhibit has. Submissions of no more than 500 words should be sent to datapublics@lancaster.ac.uk by *January 22nd* (descriptions of technical/spatial requirements and references are not included in the word count). We encourage participants to attend both the conference and a workshop, but it is not a requirement. Therefore, *please also indicate in the submission* whether you wish to attend (a) the conference and a workshop, or (b) just the conference. If you wish to attend a workshop please also indicate (c) whether you are interested in the ‘Digital Methods/ Data Visualisation’ workshop or the ‘Strategies, Tools and Participatory Processes’ workshop. *Those interested in participating in just a workshop and not the conference*, please email datapublics@lancaster.ac.uk again by *January 22nd* indicating whether you are interested in the ‘Digital Methods/Data Visualisation’ workshop or the ‘Strategies, Tools and Participatory Processes’ workshop. Please also, in no more than 100 words, state why you wish to attend. As places on the workshop are limited, this will help us select participants if necessary. If applying for a reduced fee (see below), please also state your reasons for doing so (100 words maximum).

*REGISTRATION FEES* *Conference + workshop:* £110 (Students/unwaged may apply for a reduced fee of £55). *Conference only:* £90 (Students/unwaged may apply for a reduced fee of £45) *Workshop only:* £60 (Students/unwaged may apply for a reduced fee of £30) *(Reduced fee places are limited and will be allocated first to those without recourse to external funding and then on a first come first served basis.)* *PARTNERS & ORGANISERS*

Theorizing the Web 2017

April 07 2017 to April 08 2017 | New York City

Deadline: January 22 2017

http:// theorizingtheweb.tumblr.com/2017

Updated: February 08 2017

At the Museum of the Moving Image, in Astoria, Queens..
Started in 2011, Theorizing the Web is an annual event for critical, conceptual conversations about technology and society. Theorizing the Web begins with the assumption that to talk about technology is also to discuss the self and the social world. Debate around digital social technologies too often fails to apply the many relevant literatures of social thought. We do not think “theorizing” is solely the domain of academia, and we value clear and compelling arguments that avoid jargon. Here are some photos from last year’s event if you want to see the vibe of it all. Theorizing the Web is a home for thinking about technology by people who may not think of themselves primarily as “tech” thinkers. Activists, journalists, technologists, writers, artists, and people who don’t identify as any of the above are all encouraged to submit. We especially invite submissions that engage with issues of social justice, power, inequality, and vulnerability from a diverse range of perspectives. Submissions on any topic are welcome. Some general topical suggestions include the intersections between technology and identity, privacy, sexuality, the body, power, politics, surveillance, racism, sexism, ableism, harassment, space, code, design, knowledge, images, memes, attention, work, fiction, gaming, globalization, capitalism, and protest. Submissions should be 300 to 500 words (only the first 500 words will be reviewed).

The TtW Selection Committee will blindly review submissions and make decisions in early to mid-February. Space is limited, and our acceptance rate is typically 20-35%. The presentations themselves will be 12-minute talks in a panel setting. You will be speaking to a general audience who may not share your area of expertise. Before submitting, please read our FAQ section on submissions.

NSF Dear Colleague Letter to encourage Public Participation in STEM Research (PPSR)

Deadline: April 11 2017

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17047/nsf17047.jsp

Updated: February 08 2017

Dear Colleague Letter: Public Participation in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Research: Capacity-building, community-building, and direction-setting

January 23, 2017

Dear Colleagues:

With this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL), the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Directorates for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE), Education and Human Resources (EHR), Geosciences (GEO), Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE), Engineering (ENG), Mathematics and Physical Sciences (MPS) (Divisions of Physics and Materials Research, only) and the Office of International Science and Engineering (OISE) announce their intention to support proposals aimed at capacity-building, community-building, and direction-setting for Public Participation in STEM Research (PPSR), in alignment with the Foundation's PPSR Agency Priority Goal for fiscal years (FY) 2016-2017. See https://www.performance.gov/content/invest-strategically-public-participation-science-technology-engineering-and-mathematics?view=public for more information about this goal.

In PPSR, members of the public partner with scientists and engineers to solve complex problems through participating in some or all of the formulation of questions and experiments; collection and analysis of data; and interpretation, use, and publication of results. Encompassing citizen science, citizen sensing, crowdsourcing, community science, and related approaches, PPSR also benefits public participants by providing opportunities to learn, addressing questions of concern to the participants and their communities, and contributing to science and engineering.

To help researchers, practitioners, and participants in PPSR learn from each other's experiences, collaboratively pursue PPSR challenges, and plan future PPSR efforts, NSF encourages through this DCL proposals to coordinate PPSR efforts at large, medium, and small scale. Specifically, NSF encourages proposals for (a) Research Coordination Networks (RCN) to build PPSR capacity and community; (b) conference proposals to bring together specific communities and to envision future directions for PPSR activities; and (c) PPSR-focused supplements to existing NSF-funded awards that enhance existing research activities through the introduction of PPSR components.


For more information, see: https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17047/nsf17047.jsp

Core Visiting Asst Professor/Core Renewal Fellow in Science and Technology Studies, Boston College

Deadline: March 01 2017

https://apply.interfolio.com/40561

Updated: February 07 2017

Boston College: Morrissey College of Arts & Sciences
Core Visiting Assistant Professor/Core Renewal Fellow in Science and Technology Studies
Location: Chestnut Hill, MA
Closes: Mar 1, 2017 at 11:59 PM Eastern Time
(GMT-5 hours)

The Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences at Boston College invites applications for the position of Core Visiting Assistant Professor/Core Renewal Fellow in Science and Technology Studies. The appointment for this one-year visiting assistant professorship will be for the 2017–2018 academic year. Salary is competitive, and the position is potentially renewable. As a Jesuit, Catholic institution, Boston College requires all students to complete a fifteen-course liberal arts Core Curriculum as the foundation of their undergraduate education. Core Visiting Assistant Professors will teach signature courses in the Core. Developed for first-year students, these interdisciplinary Complex Problems and Enduring Questions courses are part of an ongoing revitalization of the Core Curriculum. You can learn more about BC’s Core Renewal here: http://www.bc.edu/core.

In one semester the visiting assistant professor will teach project-based lab sections associated with a Complex Problems course, “STEM in Context: Culture, Institutions, Ethics,” co-taught by faculty from History and Biology. In the other semester, he/she will teach two courses: an Enduring Questions course (paired with a second course designed with another Core visiting professor from Environmental Studies) and an elective in his/her field.

Qualifications

Ph.D. required and should be conferred between August 1, 2014 and August 1, 2017. 

Application Instructions

Applications should be submitted electronically to http://apply.interfolio.com/40561

Deadline:  March 1, 2017

Please submit a letter of application, CV, an article-length writing sample, three letters of reference, and a teaching statement. The teaching statement should address: (1) how the applicant’s approach to teaching can link interdisciplinary academic knowledge to the formative education of students as whole persons and active citizens; (2) potential topics for an Enduring Questions course paired with another course taught by a scholar in Environmental Studies; and (3) potential topics for an elective course in your field.

This institution is using Interfolio's ByCommittee to conduct this search. Applicants to this position receive a free Dossier account and can send all application materials, including confidential letters of recommendation, free of charge.
Apply Now

For help signing up, accessing your account, or submitting your application please check out our help and support section or get in touch via email at help@interfolio.com or phone at (877) 997-8807.

Boston College is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of any legally protected category including disability and protected veteran status. To learn more about how BC supports diversity and inclusion throughout the university please visit the Office for Institutional Diversity at http://www.bc.edu/offices/diversity.

Assistant Professor (Tenure Track) in Geography, University of Guelph, Canada

Deadline: March 01 2017

http://www.uoguelph.ca/facultyjobs/postings/ad17-05.shtml

Updated: February 06 2017

Position Title / Rank: Human Dimensions of Digital Technology and Big Data in Environmental and Resource Management
Department: Geography
College: College of Social and Applied Human Science
Deadline: March 1, 2017

Position Description:

The Department of Geography at the University of Guelph invites applications for an Assistant Professor (Tenure-Track) in the human dimensions of digital technology and big data. This position will build on our existing strengths in food security, environmental governance, and energy transitions and extend departmental research and teaching proficiencies into the human geographies of the information age.

The successful candidate will be a social science scholar whose research examines intersections among digital technology, big data and analytics, society, and the environment. Application packages should illustrate potential to advance understanding of how digital technology and big data transform or reinforce interactions among communities, economic sectors, firms, government and government agencies, and/or consumers. Applicants whose research thematically focuses on environmental and/or food systems will be prioritized.

Possible research and teaching foci may include (but are not limited to): adoption and diffusion of digital technology and big data in natural resource management or agricultural harvesting (e.g., ‘smart’ agriculture, satellite monitoring technology in fisheries); economic, political, and ethical implications of digital technology and big-data across multiple scales (e.g., conservation-motivated surveillance at the global, landscape, and village/farm levels); development and implementation of digital technology and big data by transnational corporations across food and resource commodity chains (e.g., transportation logistics and consumer analytics); potential for digital technology and big data to restructure labour and labour relations in resource and agricultural sectors and/or to re-center power relative to rural people and places (e.g., mechanization/offshoring in food or resource processing; specialized genetic or cultivation techniques that allow production for high-end niche markets); and, digital technology and big data use by non-governmental organizations and/or community groups in environmental and food security campaigns (e.g., campaign-related social media and/or mobile apps etc).

The successful candidate must have a PhD in Geography or a related discipline, an established record of scholarly research, and a demonstrated commitment to excellence in teaching. The appointee will be expected to: contribute to undergraduate and graduate teaching programs; advise graduate students; develop a strong, externally funded research program; and serve on departmental, college and/or university committees.

An application, including a statement of interest, curriculum vitae, and the names of three referees, should be submitted electronically no later than March 1, 2017 to Dr. Janet Mersey, Acting Chair, Department of Geography, College of Social and Applied Human Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada, N1G 2W1 care of Jennifer Beehler (jbeehler@uoguelph.ca).

The Department of Geography at the University of Guelph has developed a reputation for outstanding research, innovative curriculum and teaching, dedicated service to the community and discipline, and collegiality. We are home to two Canada Research Chairs (one of whom is a Trudeau Fellow), a 2013 SSHRC Gold Medal Professor Emeritus, and multiple teaching award winners. For more information about the Department, see www.uoguelph.ca/geography. For information about joining the University and life in Guelph, see www.uoguelph.ca/facultyjobs/ .

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

The University of Guelph acknowledge the Attawandaron people on whose traditional territory the University of Guelph resides and offer our respect to our Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee and Métis neighbours as we strive to strengthen our relationships with them.

The University of Guelph is committed to equity in its policies, practices, and programs, supports diversity in its teaching, learning, and work environments, and ensures that applications for members of underrepresented groups are seriously considered under its employment equity policy. All qualified individuals who would contribute to the further diversification of our University community are encouraged to apply.

Postdoc, Suppes Center for the History and Philosophy of Science, Stanford University

Deadline: March 17 2017

https://apply.interfolio.com/40505

Updated: February 04 2017

We are seeking a post doctoral fellow in Logic, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science broadly conceived. We are especially interested in philosophers concentrating on one (or more) of the special sciences (biology, physics, psychology, neuro-science, etc.), and/or the history and philosophy of the science (or sciences) in question. But we shall also consider applicants doing methodological work in general philosophy of science, including formal work in logic, probability, or epistemology in connection with such methodological issues.

The appointment term is September 1, 2017-August 31, 2018. The initial term may be renewed for an additional year. Applicants must have completed all requirements for their PhD by June 30, 2017. Candidates must also be no more than 3 years from the awarding of their degree (i.e., September 2014).

The application deadline is March 17, 2017 (5:00 pm Pacific Standard Time).

Stanford University is an affirmative action and equal opportunity employer, committed to increasing the diversity of its workforce. It welcomes applications from women, members of minority groups, veterans, persons with disabilities, and others who would bring additional dimensions to the university's research and teaching mission.
 
Please submit a cover letter, CV, a writing sample (no more than 25 pages), three letters of recommendation, a one-page research statement and a teaching portfolio.

Applications will be collected via Interfolio: https://apply.interfolio.com/40505

If you have questions, please contact Teresa Mooney (tmooney@stanford.edu).

NSF seeking proposals: Innovations at the Nexus of Food, Energy and Water Systems

Deadline: March 06 2017

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505241

Updated: February 02 2017

National Science Foundation in Arlington VA is seeking proposals to the program on Innovations at the Nexus of Food, Energy and Water Systems

Amount: $2,500,000 per award maximum total for 3 years ($40 M is projected to be spent in total)

Requires:
- Three PIs from three distinct NSF directorates (seeking PIs from Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences)
- Integration across the three disciplines from the three directorates
- A systems approach
- Attention to food, energy, and water systems (not just one or two)
- Placement into one of three tracks
-- system modeling or
-- visualization and decision support or
-- system solutions (the track that seems most reception to proposals with SBE sciences in the lead)

Assistant Professor, Health and Human Values (NTE), University of Arizona

Deadline: March 01 2017

https://uacareers.com/postings/16329

Updated: February 01 2017

Assistant Professor, Health and Human Values (NTE)
University of Arizona, The Honors College
Main Campus

Contact Information for Candidates:
Laura Berry
Associate Dean, Honors College
berry@email.arizona.edu

The Honors College at the University of Arizona invites applications for a three-year renewable position in the core Honors Interdisciplinary faculty, and in particular to teach in the Honors College Health and Human Values minor. The minor is an intensive interdisciplinary program, intended to provide a knowledge and theory base in the social sciences and the humanities for high-ability students planning careers in the health professions.

https://www.honors.arizona.edu/health-and-human-values-minor

Responsibilities will include teaching 3 courses per semester, and assisting with the coordination of the minor. Possible courses include team-teaching an introduction to the minor, teaching advanced electives within the minor, teaching small general education courses for the Honors College, and assisting with the coordination of the capstone for the minor. The position includes avenues for promotion to Associate or Full Professor, non-tenure eligible.

Additional duties may be assigned.

The successful candidate will hold an interdisciplinary PhD that combines the social sciences and humanities, or one in a social scientific discipline. Background and interests should focus on health and medical science related topics, informed by social and/or cultural perspectives. Likely disciplinary backgrounds include Anthropology, History, or Sociology, among others. Attention to matters of race, sexuality, border issues, gender, disability studies, and social class are of particular interest. A strong record of interdisciplinary and innovative teaching is important; administrative experience a plus.

Applicants should attach a CV, the names of three references, and a cover letter describing how the candidate’s experience fits with the Health and Human Values minor.

At the University of Arizona, we value our inclusive climate because we know that diversity in experiences and perspectives is vital to advancing innovation, critical thinking, solving complex problems, and creating an inclusive academic community. We translate these values into action by seeking individuals who have experience and expertise working with diverse students, colleagues and constituencies. Because we seek a workforce with a wide range of perspectives and experiences, we encourage diverse candidates to apply, including people of color, women, veterans, and individuals with disabilities. As an Employer of National Service, we also welcome alumni of AmeriCorps, Peace Corps, and other national service programs and others who will help us advance our Inclusive Excellence initiative aimed at creating a university that values student, staff, and faculty engagement in addressing issues of diversity and inclusiveness.

Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Design, Wesleyan University

Deadline: February 21 2017

Updated: January 26 2017

Job Posting Number: F00144
Position Type: Full-Time

Position Details: Wesleyan University’s Center for Pedagogical Innovation invites applications for an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Design beginning July 1, 2017. We seek a scholar who is broadly trained in the many areas of design across the arts, humanities, and humanistic social sciences, including familiarity with engineering as it relates to a liberal arts curriculum. Candidates will be expected to have an advanced degree in a field related to design in hand or near completion. The teaching load is 2/1. Additional duties include (1) organizing a spring workshop on the pedagogy of design that will offer training in new pedagogical tools and strategies and emphasize inclusive pedagogy techniques, and (2) assisting in the development of a new student competency, “navigating complex environments,” and the assessment of this competency. This position will offer research and/or travel funds and is renewable for a second year contingent upon performance.

Minimum Qualifications: Candidates will be expected to have an advanced degree in a field related to design in hand or near completion.

Special Instructions to Applicants: You will be asked to upload electronic versions of the items we require, which are (1) a cover letter of application, (2) a curriculum vitae, (3) a writing sample, (4) statement of current research, and (5) documentation of teaching experience, including teaching statement, course syllabi and student evaluations. As part of the cover letter or teaching statement we invite you to describe your cultural competencies and experiences engaging a diverse student body.

You will also be asked to provide the email addresses of three referees from whom we may obtain confidential letters of recommendation (please double-check the accuracy of the email addresses of the referees you name to insure that you have the most up-to-date email addresses for each one).

After you have submitted all of the required documents, you will see a confirmation number. At that point, each of the three referees whose email address you have provided will receive an automatically-generated email requesting that he or she submit a letter of reference for you.

Additional Information: Applications completed by Tuesday, February 21, 2017 will receive full consideration.

Please contact Lisa Sacks at lsacks@wesleyan.edu or 860-685-3248 if you have questions about the application process.

Note for Interfolio users:
We gladly accept letters of recommendation from Interfolio. From your Interfolio account, please use the “web delivery” method to upload your letters directly to our online application.

For further instructions, look here: http://help.interfolio.com/entries/24062742-Uploading-Letters-to-an-Online-Application-System.

New Edited Volume from Judy Wajcman and Nigel Dodd, The Sociology of Speed (OUP, 2017)

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-sociology-of-speed-9780198782858

Updated: January 25 2017

The Sociology of Speed: Digital, Organizational, and Social Temporalities
Edited by Judy Wajcman and Nigel Dodd

- Pulls together and extends the most important theoretical and empirical innovations across the social sciences
- Interdisciplinary in appeal; contributions from authors in a range of fields including social and cultural theory, economic sociology, science and technology studies, and sociology of organizations among others.
- Contributions by leading scholars from both the US and Europe
- Clearly laid out and accessibly written

Description:
There is a widespread perception that life is faster than it used to be. We hear constant laments that we live too fast, that time is scarce, and that the pace of everyday life is spiraling out of our control. The iconic image that abounds is that of the frenetic, technologically tethered, iPhone/iPad-addicted citizen. Yet weren't modern machines supposed to save, and thereby free up, time?

The purpose of this book is to bring a much-needed sociological perspective to bear on speed: it examines how speed and acceleration came to signify the zeitgeist, and explores the political implications of this. Among the major questions addressed are: when did acceleration become the primary rationale for technological innovation and the key measure of social progress? Is acceleration occurring across all sectors of society and all aspects of life, or are some groups able to mobilise speed as a resource while others are marginalised and excluded? Does the growing centrality of technological mediations (of both information and communication) produce slower as well as faster times, waiting as well as 'busyness', stasis as well as mobility? To what extent is the contemporary imperative of speed as much a cultural artefact as a material one? To make sense of everyday life in the twenty-first century, we must begin by interrogating the social dynamics of speed.

This book shows how time is a collective accomplishment, and that temporality is experienced very differently by diverse groups of people, especially between the affluent and those who service them.

Tenured Faculty Position in Engineering, Policy & Society, Arizona State University

Deadline: March 03 2017

https://sfis.asu.edu/jobs

Updated: January 24 2017

Associate/Full Professor Faculty Position
Arizona State University
School for the Future of Innovation in Society
Ira A Fulton Schools of Engineering
Job #11871

Arizona State University (ASU) invites applications for a tenured faculty position (associate or full) focused on the future of innovation in society and to lead creation of the Center for Engineering, Policy and Society (CEPS). The center will serve as a focal point for a growing group of current and future faculty working collaboratively between the School for the Future of Innovation in Society and the Fulton Schools of Engineering.

We are particularly interested in candidates with foci in the societal aspects of one or more of the following areas: 1) information and communication technologies, including big data, social networks, smart cities and smart objects; 2) artificial intelligence and autonomous systems; 3) bioengineering, synthetic biology and health systems; 3) environmental or sustainable engineering and the Anthropocene; 4) advanced materials, including nanotechnology; and 5) humanitarian engineering. The successful candidate will be expected to have an independently funded and highly collaborative research program, teach and mentor students, participate in professional and university service, and engage with stakeholders in their work – all in concert with ASU’s emphasis on access, excellence and impact.

The anticipated start date is August 2017. The tenure home will be in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society (SFIS) and a share of the appointment will be in one of the six schools within the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering.

Required Qualifications: Doctorate or terminal degree in an appropriate field by the time of appointment; substantial education and/or demonstrated expertise in a field of engineering; substantial expertise or training in the social sciences, humanities, and/or policy; demonstrated research and teaching interests at the intersection of engineering, policy and society; evidence of high performance in research, teaching/training and outreach/engagement appropriate to rank; and evidence of or strong potential for academic leadership.

Desired Qualifications: Demonstrated ability to work across multiple domains and sectors; interest in engineering education, outreach and engagement through innovative techniques; and a specific interest in and ability to thrive within the context set by the New American University, the ASU Charter and its design aspirations.

As the newest element of ASU’s approach to building a “New American University” (http://newamericanuniversity.asu.edu/), SFIS (sfis.asu.edu) provides robust opportunities for intellectual fusion, use-inspired research, and global engagement via ongoing projects and centers. SFIS hosts a variety of graduate degrees including a Ph.D. in Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology and a Master of Science degree in Global Technology and Development, as well as an undergraduate major, minor and certificate. Affiliated with SFIS is the Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes (CSPO; http://www.cspo.org) - consistently ranked one of the top science and technology policy think tanks in the world – and the emerging Institute for the Future of Innovation in Society.

The Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering offer more than 60 degree options at ASU’s Tempe and Polytechnic campuses and online. Enrollment has grown to more than 20,000 students from all 50 states and 121 countries. The Fulton Schools are known for the creativity of its faculty and their innovations in energy, health, sustainability, security and education. With nearly $100M in external research funding, the faculty are engaged in projects around the globe and known for their ability to tackle technical and societal challenges requiring multi-investigator transdisciplinary teams.

To apply, please submit: 1) a detailed cover letter that includes a description of the applicant's research and teaching interests and experience (limited to 4 pages); 2) a current Curriculum Vitae; and 3) the names, email addresses and telephone numbers of three references. All materials should be submitted as a single PDF document to cspo@asu.edu. Review of applications will begin March 3, 2017; if not filled, a review will occur every Friday thereafter until the search is closed. A background check is required for employment.

Arizona State University is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer committed to excellence through diversity (see ASU’s Prohibition Against Discrimination, Harassment, and Retaliation policy at http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd401.html). All qualified applicants will be considered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other basis protected by law (see ASU’s Title IX policy at https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/). Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

Fellowships, The Consortium for History of Science, Technology and Medicine

Deadline: February 15 2017

http://www.chstm.org/

Updated: January 20 2017

The Consortium for History of Science, Technology and Medicine invites applications for fellowships in the history of science, technology and medicine, broadly construed. Opportunities include:

-short-term Research Fellowships
-nine-month Dissertation Fellowships
-NEH Postdoctoral Fellowships
-Fellowships-in-Residence

Applications for 2017-2018 must be submitted by February 15, 2017. Letters of support are due by February 22, 2017. For the application portal, application instructions, and a list of past fellows, visit http://www.chstm.org.

Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Genetics, Columbia University

Deadline: February 15 2017

Updated: January 17 2017

The Center for Research on Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Psychiatric, Neurologic and Behavioral Genetics at Columbia University announces the availability of a post-doctoral fellowship position to begin September 2017.

The goal of the fellowship is to train researchers whose work is focused on the ethical, legal and social implications of advances in genetics, with a special focus on psychiatric, neurologic, and behavioral genetics. Training programs, which will generally last 2 years, include course work, mentored research activities, guidance in seeking research funding, and participation in the activities of the Center. All activities are designed to accommodate the skills and interests of the fellows.

Candidates should have a doctorate (e.g., PhD, JD, MD) in the social and behavioral sciences, genetics or other basic sciences, epidemiology, nursing, medicine, law, or one of the humanities, and substantial empirical research skills.

The deadline for application is February 15, 2017. For further information about the program and application materials, please contact the Training Director, Sharon Schwartz, PhD: sbs5@ columbia.edu.

Non-Tenure-Stream Position in Archives & Information Sciences, University of Pittsburgh

Deadline: February 15 2017

http://www.Click2apply.net/59vfcz69t3

Updated: January 11 2017

The School of Computing and Information at the University of Pittsburgh (http://www.ischool.pitt.edu) is currently inviting applications for a non-tenure-stream faculty position in the field of Archives and Information Sciences at an Assistant/Associate Professor level– Position #27041 (Non-Tenure Stream). The initial appointment is expected to be three years. Anticipated start date is August 1, 2017.

We are seeking candidates with the desire and ability to lead our Archives and Information Sciences pathway. The successful candidate will have a strong commitment to impactful research as well as to teach at the graduate and undergraduate level. The applicant's main research and teaching areas may include:
- Digital curation, preservation, and stewardship, including data archives, research data management, and innovative methods for long-term information stewardship;
- Historical and contemporary archival research and practice, with an emphasis on how traditional archival functions are being transformed in today's digital, collaborative environments;
- Specialized fields such as community archives and informatics, digital forensics, and digital humanities;
- Information governance and US and international archival recordkeeping policies, traditions, and laws.

Our School has maintained one of the leading archives graduate programs in the United States for many years. We are particularly interested in someone who is comfortable with our department's growing focus on data stewardship and digital curation. Candidates applying for the position are expected to hold an earned doctorate or the equivalent in academic or professional experience. Applicants should present a record of effective teaching, research, leadership abilities and related scholarly activities. Electronic applications should be sent to https://ischoolatpitt.wufoo.com/forms/faculty-position-in-archives-and-info-sciences/. Applications should include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, research statement, teaching statement, and the names, postal addresses, email addresses, and telephone numbers for three references. For full consideration and priority, applications must be received by February 15, 2017. Questions about the position should be directed to:

Dr. Richard Cox
Chair of the Search Committee
School of Computing and Information
University of Pittsburgh

The University of Pittsburgh School of Computing and Information is a top-ranked information school (iSchool) offering a wide variety of multidisciplinary opportunities, including an undergraduate program (BSIS), Master's programs in information science (MSIS), telecommunications & networking (MST), library & information science (MLIS), and Ph.D. programs. The School offers generous research, teaching, travel, and administrative support.

Pittsburgh's industrial past has given way to an enterprising and vibrant present. Affordable living, world-class universities, distinctive neighborhoods, growing industries, and an abundance of leisure activities create a quality of life in Pittsburgh that is virtually unmatched. Pittsburgh is consistently ranked in Rand McNally's Top Ten Most Livable Cities in North America.

The University of Pittsburgh is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer Minorities/Women/Vets/Disabled.

Apply Here: http://www.Click2apply.net/59vfcz69t3

Non-Tenure-Stream Position in Data Stewardship, University of Pittsburgh

Deadline: February 15 2017

http://www.Click2apply.net/mtjzdsmpnx

Updated: January 11 2017

The School of Computing and Information (http://www.ischool.pitt.edu) at the University of Pittsburgh is seeking to fill a faculty position in Data Stewardship at an Assistant/Associate Professor level – Position #134534 (Non-Tenure Stream). The initial appointment is expected to be three years. Anticipated start date is August 1, 2017.

We are looking for an experienced practitioner and scholar in Data Stewardship who can demonstrate an in-depth understanding of data curation, data documentation and data preservation, specifically:
- Current best practices and policy surrounding active data management through the data lifecycle, including data collection, data management plans, data storage, data quality and reproducibility
- Experience of handling research data including application of data standards and formats, data description and documentation, metadata schema for disciplinary data, data citation and persistent identifiers, data publication, data analysis, data visualization, data re-use and metrics
- Contemporary good practice in data selection and appraisal, data infrastructure including data repository software platforms, and long-term data preservation strategies
- An awareness of diverse disciplinary data practices, research workflows and workflow platforms, as well as an in-depth knowledge of particular domain(s).

The University of Pittsburgh School is a top-ranked information school (iSchool) offering a wide variety of multidisciplinary opportunities, including an undergraduate program (BSIS), Master's programs in information science (MSIS), telecommunications & networking (MST), library & information science (MLIS), and Ph.D. programs. The new Data Stewardship Pathway for graduate students studying for the MLIS, draws on the concept of “translational data science”, described by Lyon & Brenner (2015) as:

“the enhanced transition of skills, software tools and intelligence from the iSchool to the marketplace, which may be interpreted as industry, government, libraries, archives or data centers”. Adopting a translational perspective will enable iSchools to supply and deploy data talent and data products more rapidly to the range of consumers, where there is currently an acknowledged workforce need”.

Development of the Data Stewardship Pathway has been further informed by the results of two small-scale studies, which featured an analysis of requirements for real-world positions in each of the six data science roles (data archivist, data librarian, data steward / curator, data analyst, data engineer and data journalist) and which highlighted the knowledge, skills and competencies being sought by employers (Lyon, Mattern, Acker & Langmead 2016; Lyon & Mattern 2016).

We expect candidates for this position to possess strong experience within the broader data community or in professional data curation environments and to have excellent interpersonal, communication and team skills. The new faculty member is expected to be able to liaise and collaborate with disciplinary faculty and researchers across a range of Schools and Departments in the University, but also with the regional, national and international data community. The University is actively addressing the development and adoption of research data management infrastructure, working through the Data Management Committee and administration support services on campus.

The successful candidate will contribute to the Data Stewardship Pathway through both research and teaching undergrad and post-graduate students, and will be expected to demonstrate an awareness of current data developments, trends, challenges, emerging fields and a positive commitment to research. As the School offers an online degree program in addition to on-campus programs, candidates with complementary expertise and experience in educational technologies are encouraged to apply.

Candidates applying for the position(s) are expected to hold an earned Doctorate or the equivalent in academic or professional experience. Applicants should present a record of effective teaching, research and related scholarly activities. Electronic applications should be sent to https://ischoolatpitt.wufoo.com/forms/faculty-position-in-data-stewardship/. Applications should include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, research statement, teaching statement, and the names, addresses (with e-mail), and telephone numbers of three references. For full consideration, applications must be received by February 15, 2017.


Dr. Richard Cox
Chair of Search Committee
School of Computing and Information
University of Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh's industrial past has given way to an enterprising and vibrant present. Affordable living, world-class universities, distinctive neighborhoods, growing industries, and an abundance of leisure activities create a quality of life in Pittsburgh that is virtually unmatched. Pittsburgh is consistently ranked in Rand McNally's Top Ten Most Livable Cities in North America.

The University of Pittsburgh is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer Minorities/Women/Vets/Disabled.

Apply Here: http://www.Click2apply.net/mtjzdsmpnx

Research Scholar at The Hastings Center in Garrison, New York

Deadline: February 28 2017

http://www.thehastingscenter.org/who-we-are/our-research/

Updated: January 11 2017

The Hastings Center seeks applications and nominations for a full-time position of Research Scholar/Senior Research Scholar.

Description: This position offers a superb opportunity for an early career, mid-career or established scholar to devote themselves to research and public outreach on questions of national and international significance. The Hastings Center is a world-renowned bioethics research institute with an active research portfolio and outstanding collaborative relationships with researchers and institutions in the US and other countries.

The successful candidate will have strong analytic skills and the ability to identify and address major ethical, legal and social issues in health, health care and science. They will be committed to collegial, interdisciplinary work. Like Hastings Center’s current research scholars, the new member of our team will have experience securing grant funding that enables original research on timely topics. We are particularly interested in candidates whose research aims to inform health and/or science policy and practice.

In addition to Hastings’ commitment to original scholarship, we are committed to engaging the public. The successful candidate will have strong writing and speaking skills and the desire to become a public voice on issues of societal concern. Each member of our research team collaborates with the Hastings Center’s Communications Department in outreach to journalists, policymakers, opinion leaders, and other audiences. More information about the Hastings Center’s program areas, public outreach activities, and research projects is available at http://www.thehastingscenter.org/who-we-are/our-research.

Qualifications: Competitive candidates will have a PhD, JD, MD, or other relevant terminal degree or combination of degrees. Although a degree in bioethics is not essential, the successful candidate should have training or significant experience in bioethics, or be able to demonstrate that they have applied their disciplinary skills to bioethical concerns, health policy, or the governance of emerging technologies. Experience in project development and grant-writing is important.

To apply: send a letter of application describing your background, research interests, and fit for the position, along with: your resume or CV, two writing samples; and the names and contact information for two references to jobs@thehastingscenter.org. Electronic applications are preferred. Questions sent to jobs@thehastingscenter.org will be answered promptly. Applications will be held in confidence.

To nominate: call or email Jodi Fernandes, Executive Assistant to the President at 845-424-4040 or fernandesj@thehastingscenter.org. Nominations will be held in confidence.

Application deadline: February 28, 2017. Applications will be reviewed as they are received.

The Hastings Center offers a competitive salary commensurate with experience, health insurance, TIAA-CREF pension plan, generous vacation, sick leave and holiday schedules. We are an equal opportunity employer, committed to building a diverse staff and creating an inclusive environment for all employees.

The Hastings Center is an independent, nonprofit, nonpartisan institution that since 1969 has been a leader in research, education, and policy recommendations on the ethical and social impact of advances in medicine, health care, and biotechnology. The Center is located in Garrison, New York, 50 miles north of New York City in the beautiful central Hudson River Valley, with easy transportation into and out of Manhattan. For more information about The Hastings Center, visit: http://www.thehastingscenter.org.

3 Visiting Fellowships on Innovation and Innovation Society, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany

Deadline: January 30 2017

http://www.innovation.tu-berlin.de/fileadmin/i62_ifsgktypo3/Visiting_Fellowships_2016.pdf

Updated: January 10 2017

The DFG graduate school “Innovation Society Today” at the Technische Universität Berlin, Germany, is pleased to advertise 3 visiting fellowships. The fellowships are available for a period of three months, either from April to June 2017 or October to December 2017.

The deadline for applications and letters of recommendation is January 30th, 2017. Please submit all documents to the following email address: jobs@innovation.tu- berlin.de.

Post Doctoral Fellowship in the History of Science and Technology, NYU

Deadline: March 01 2017

https://apply.interfolio.com/40067

Updated: January 10 2017

The Gallatin School of Individualized Study at New York University invites applications for a post-doctoral fellowship for one year in the history of science and technology, or a related field, with the possibility for renewal for a second year. The Fellowship, which will begin September 1, 2017, will include a $42,000 annual stipend, a $20,000 housing allowance, full medical benefits and assistance with relocation. The research of the successful candidate should be interdisciplinary in nature and complement the work of historians of science already at Gallatin, as we look to strengthen the history-of-science community within New York University and New York City. The successful candidate will advance their own research project, teach two undergraduate courses a year, assist in the execution and development of the NYC History of Science Group, the NYU Science and Society minor and take part in the academic life of NYU and the Gallatin School. All application materials must be submitted electronically. To apply, please visit: https://apply.interfolio.com/40067

Candidates are requested to submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, a research proposal on a topic related to the project (750 words maximum), a sample or samples of writing (i.e., article or book chapter), two course proposals, and two letters of recommendation.

All application materials must be received by March 1, 2017.

Founded in 1972, Gallatin is a liberal arts college of 1,400 students within New York University. Its B.A. and M.A. programs in individualized study encourage students to develop an integrated, multidisciplinary program of study that combines courses taken in the various schools of NYU with independent studies, internships, and Gallatin’s own interdisciplinary seminars, writing courses and arts workshops. The School emphasizes excellent teaching, intensive student advising and mentoring, and a unique combination of program flexibility and academic rigor.

NYU is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

Tenure Track Assistant Professor of Science & Technology Studies, Stevens Institute of Technology

Deadline: January 10 2017

https://stevens.wd5.myworkdayjobs.com/en-US/External/job/Hoboken-NJ---Main-Campus/Tenure-Track-Assistant-Professor-of-Science---

Updated: January 10 2017

The College of Arts and Letters at Stevens Institute of Technology is seeking candidates for a full-time, tenure-track appointment as Assistant Professor in the Science & Technology Studies program. Candidates must hold a Ph.D. in a field relevant to Science & Technology Studies including, but not limited to, History of Science and / or Technology; Sociology of Science; and Science, Technology, and Society. Candidates who focus on the social dimensions of science, technology, medicine, or the environment are encouraged to apply.

Preferred candidates will have a historical specialization and strong track record of historical research, and the candidate must be capable of teaching a course on the Scientific Revolution, as well as survey courses in the History of Science and / or Technology. Periodization is open so long as these teaching requirements are satisfied. Strong preference will also be given to candidates whose work embraces interdisciplinary themes and digital scholarship.

The College of Arts and Letters at Stevens values diversity and seeks candidates who can contribute to a welcoming climate for students of all races and genders. Stevens is an NSF ADVANCE institution committed to equitable practices and policies.

We strongly encourage qualified women and minority candidates to apply.

Stevens Institute of Technology, founded in 1870, is located in Hoboken, NJ, directly across the Hudson River from New York City. Stevens students, faculty, and partners leverage their collective real-world experience and culture of innovation, research, and entrepreneurship to confront global challenges in engineering, science, systems, and technology management. The College of Arts and Letters contributes to the mission of Stevens with programs that engage in research and creative activity at the intersection of science, technology, the arts, humanities, and social science in ways that benefit society.

Candidates interested in applying should prepare an application that includes a letter of intent, current C.V., statement of teaching philosophy and the names and contact information for three referees. Please combine all materials into a single document (MSWord or PDF) for submission. Review of applications will begin on January 10th, 2017 and continue until the position is filled.

New Book from Shirley Sun: Socio-economics of Personalized Medicine in Asia

http://www.routledge.com/9781138933835

Updated: January 10 2017

Shirley Sun. Socio-economics of Personalized Medicine in Asia (Routledge, 2017). Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore.

Synopsis:
This book contributes to a growing body of literature on the molecularization of identities by tracing and analyzing "personalized medicine" as it unfolds in Asia. It shows that there are inextricable transnational linkages between developing and developed countries, and examines the various social forces shaping the "co-production" of genomic science, medicine and social order in transnational settings. Theoretically guided and empirically grounded, the book provides important insights into the formation and usage of racial and ethnic human taxonomies in population-based genomic science and medicine.

Reviews
"This is a major contribution to the ongoing debate about the relationship between "personalized medicine" and "racialized medicine". Dr. Sun documents how in practice, the two are far more integrated than previous analysts have recognized or acknowledged. Using an international platform, Sun demonstrates how Asian geneticists (Japanese, Chinese, Singaporean, Korean, et al), in a pushback against US-European domination of human molecular genetics, are often inadvertently re-inscribing ethnic and racial categories generated in the West."
— Troy Duster, author of Backdoor to Eugenics, Chancellor's Professor, University of California, Berkeley

"A highly timely counter-weight to the dominance of works on this topic from North America and Europe, Shirley Sun's brilliant and sobering analysis of 'probability medicine' in Singapore will make even the most reflective reader think about the global implications of genomic medicine differently."
— Barbara Prainsack, Professor at Social Science, Health and Medicine of King’s College London, U.K.

"This book addresses a critical but understudied topic: personalized medicine within the context of Asia. Asian countries are key leaders in the move towards personalized medicine, but as the author points out, historically personalized medicine has been viewed through a Western centric focus. The findings also have implications for the large Asian population residing in the US and other countries. The book is engaging to read and insightful in its interpretations. I recommend it to anyone who wants to understand the global context of the emerging trend towards personalized, precision
medicine and how it will change the future of health care."
— Kathryn Phillips, Professor of Health Economics and Health Services Research at the University of California, San Francisco, and Founder/Director of the UCSF Center for Translational and Policy Research on Personalized Medicine (TRANSPERS)

PhD in interdisciplinarity in training the next generation of researchers, University of Edinburgh

Deadline: February 28 2017

Updated: December 09 2016

Funding is available to support a four-year (1+3) PhD programme at the University of Edinburgh covering fees (at the UK/EU rate) and an annual stipend of £14,000 from September 2017

PhD topic: Disruptive influence? The role of interdisciplinarity in training the next generation of researchers

Host institution: Science, Technology and Innovation Studies (STIS), in the School of Social and Political Science, University of Edinburgh in partnership with OPTIMA, the Centre for Doctoral Training in Optical Medical Imaging (based at the Universities of Edinburgh and Strathclyde).

Summary statement of topic:
The ascendancy of interdisciplinary research has become a cornerstone of research policy in Europe and internationally (e.g. European Commission, 2007; ESRC, 2009; NSF, 2006; National Academies, 2005; Barry, 2007; Lok, 2010). Yet there remains considerable scope for expanding the breadth and depth of interdisciplinary research training in the UK. Most doctoral and post-doctoral training is still bound within disciplines. Today, there is clear evidence of demand for interdisciplinary research training (e.g. Lyall and Meagher 2012) and much national and international experience on which to draw (e.g. Vanstone et al 2013; Meagher and Lyall 2005, 2009; Razzaq et al 2013; Abt Associates, 2010).

Universities are beginning to lose their monopoly on knowledge production (Frodeman, 2013) and need to reconsider and re-shape their curricula in order to produce the people and research that society needs (Foray and Sors, 2014; Lyall et al., 2015). The majority of graduate students now find employment outside of academia (Vitae, 2013) where an ability to work in interdisciplinary teams is often highly rated; even those who stay within a university research context find that experience of interdisciplinary is becoming more valued (Millar, 2013).

In the UK, the Research Councils are increasingly supporting PhD training through a mechanism termed ‘Centres for Doctoral Training’ (CDTs). These centres seek to bring together diverse areas of expertise in order to create new working cultures, build relationships between teams in universities and forge links with industry. In many of these CDTs, doctoral study remains circumscribed within the social sciences, natural sciences or medicine, while others are co-funded by more than one research council and place great emphasis on interdisciplinary projects that work across different disciplinary domains.

This study will examine the impact of this doctoral funding mechanism on PhD students and their supervisors. Specifically, it will identify the range of interdisciplinary experiences and environments offered by the CDTs. The study will develop a series of case studies to assess the influence that interdisciplinary CDTs are having on the research community and other stakeholders.

The successful candidate will be encouraged to develop the project according to their own interests and expertise.

Supervisors:

The first supervisor will be Catherine Lyall who is a Professor of Science and Public Policy in the University of Edinburgh’s School of Social and Political Science. Her recent research focus has been on the promotion and management of interdisciplinary research (e.g. Lyall et al., 2011) and on the evaluation of non-academic research impacts.

A second supervisor will be appointed during the first year and there will be close involvement from OPTIMA colleagues in order to facilitate access.

Applications:
Candidates from a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Prospective candidates are expected to have an excellent undergraduate degree in either the social (e.g. sociology, anthropology, education etc.) or natural sciences (e.g. chemistry, computer science, biology etc.) and a strong interest in and/or experience of interdisciplinary research.

Note that we are only able to offer fees at the UK/EU level; non UK/EU applicants must be able to fund the additional fees at the international level.
Informal inquiries can be made to Professor Catherine Lyall by email c.lyall@ed.ac.uk Information about application procedures can be found on our Graduate School website.

Deadline:
The deadline for applications is 28 February 2017for a September 2017 entry. Note that, for this specific studentship, this is earlier than the general deadline specified in the above weblink.

Link to full information: https://www.wiki.ed.ac.uk/display/ISSTIInterdisciplinary/Interdisciplinary+wiki?preview=/72843811/330217325/Interdisciplinary%20studentship%20Edinburgh.pdf

Assistant Professor, SFIS and SCIDSE, Arizona State University

Deadline: January 13 2017

Updated: December 09 2016

Assistant Professor Faculty Position
Arizona State University
School for the Future of Innovation in Society
School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering
Job # 11827

Arizona State University (ASU) invites applications for one tenure-eligible, assistant professor position focused on the future of innovation in society. We seek candidates with interests in one or more of the following areas: human-centered computing, the impact of Internet-of-things and big data on society, the impact of information access on society and human behavior, policy and ethics of autonomous systems, artificial intelligence, or data security & privacy, logistics and social networks, smart cities and smart objects, and humanitarian engineering. We are also interested in candidates who bring interest in computer science and engineering education through innovative techniques.

Anticipated start date is August 2017. The appointment will reside jointly in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society (SFIS) and in the School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering (CIDSE), one of ASU’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering. The tenure home will be SFIS.

The successful candidate will be expected to develop an independently funded and highly collaborative research program, teach and mentor students, participate in professional and university service, and engage stakeholders in their work – all in concert with ASU’s emphasis on access, excellence and impact. Additionally, the successful candidate will be expected to network across a growing group of faculty involved in engineering, policy and society.

Required Qualifications: Doctorate or terminal degree in an appropriate field (e.g., computer science, industrial engineering, software engineering, informatics, social or policy studies of science and technology, information studies, etc.) by the time of appointment; demonstrated research and teaching interests at the intersection of computing, engineering, policy and society.

Desired Qualifications: 1) Substantial education and/or demonstrated expertise in computing, informatics or engineering management; 2) demonstrated ability to work across multiple sectors in research, training, and outreach; 3) relevant policy experience or training (e.g., advanced degree in policy or related field, several years working in policy position, etc.); and 4) a specific interest in and ability to thrive within the context set by the New American University.

For more information or questions about this position, please contact the search committee chair Professor Clark Miller (clark.miller@asu.edu).

As the newest element of ASU’s approach to building a “New American University” (http://newamericanuniversity.asu.edu/), SFIS (http://sfis.asu.edu) provides robust opportunities for intellectual fusion, use-inspired research, and global engagement via ongoing projects and centers. SFIS hosts a variety of graduate degrees including a Ph.D. in Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology and a Master of Science degree in Global Technology and Development, as well as an undergraduate major, minor and certificate. Affiliated with SFIS is the Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes (CSPO; http://www.cspo.org) - consistently ranked one of the top science and technology policy think tanks in the world – and the emerging Institute for the Future of Innovation in Society.

CIDSE’s (http://cidse.engineering.asu.edu/) core mission is to advance research, education and entrepreneurship in the broad areas of algorithmic techniques for transforming data into information, utilization of that information to create knowledge and development of tools and techniques that enable responsible use of that knowledge by the decision-makers for the betterment of our society. Degree programs are offered in computer science, computer systems engineering, engineering management, industrial engineering, informatics and software engineering.

To apply, please submit: 1) a detailed cover letter that includes a description of the applicant's research and teaching interests and experience (limited to 4 pages); 2) a current Curriculum Vitae; and 3) the names, email addresses and telephone numbers of three references. All materials should be submitted as a single PDF document to cspo@asu.edu. Review of applications will begin January 13, 2017; if not filled, a review will occur every Friday thereafter until the search is closed. A background check is required for employment.

Arizona State University is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer committed to excellence through diversity (see ASU’s Prohibition Against Discrimination, Harassment, and Retaliation policy at http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd401.html). All qualified applicants will be considered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other basis protected by law (see ASU’s Title IX policy at https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/). Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

Assistant Professor, History of Science Department, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Deadline: January 24 2017

https://jobs.wisc.edu

Updated: December 09 2016

The Department of the History of Science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison invites applications for an Assistant Professor position (tenure-track) beginning August 2017. We are especially interested in applications in the following areas: (1) history of science or technology before 1800; (2) history of the human sciences; or (3) history of information technologies. We are also interested in applicants whose area of study lies outside the United States. We are open to a variety of disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and methodological approaches. We are particularly interested in candidates who can promote interdisciplinary synergies between the History of Science, Medicine, & Technology (HSMT) program and other study programs in the Department of History; the Holtz Center for Science & Technology Studies; and/or other programs in the humanities, social sciences, or natural sciences. The successful candidate is expected to conduct significant scholarly research leading to publication in the area of specialization; teach and advise at the undergraduate and graduate levels; and actively participate in the broader HSMT community at UW-Madison. Appropriate departmental, university, and public outreach service is required.

A Ph.D. in History of Science; History; Science & Technology Studies; or closely related discipline prior to the start of the appointment is required.

Applications must be received by January 24, 2017. All applications must be submitted online at https://jobs.wisc.edu . Search for 88583. Electronic applications must include PDF files of the following: letter of application, curriculum vitae, and one article-length writing sample or chapter. If the writing sample forms part of a larger book manuscript or dissertation, please include an abstract and table of contents or a statement of how the writing sample fits in with the larger project. You will be asked to provide contact information for three references; they will each receive an electronic link through which they can upload a signed letter of reference. The letter of application should include a statement of interest that discusses current and future research as well as anticipated course offerings at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Candidates should comment specifically on their capacity to teach current HSMT undergraduate courses as well as new courses that would complement existing offerings. Preliminary interviews will be conducted by phone or Skype.

Questions about the position may be directed to either of the search committee co-chairs, Professor Florence Hsia (fchsia@wisc.edu) or Professor Sue Lederer (selederer@wisc.edu).

UW-Madison is committed to creating a diverse and inclusive community. Women, minorities, veterans, and people with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Unless confidentiality is requested in writing, information regarding applicants must be released upon request. Finalists cannot be guaranteed confidentiality. State law requires a criminal background check prior to employment. The University of Wisconsin is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer.

The Annual Security and Fire Safety Report contains current campus safety and disciplinary policies, crime statistics for the previous 3 calendar years, and on-campus student housing fire safety policies and fire statistics for the previous 3 calendar years. UW-Madison will provide a paper copy upon request; please contact the University of Wisconsin Police Department.

Postdoc position in ERC project “Processing Citizenship”

Deadline: January 08 2017

https://www.utwente.nl/en/organization/careers/vacancies/!/vacature/816678

Updated: December 09 2016

The Department of Science, Technology, and Policy Studies (STePS), Faculty of Behavioural, Management and Social sciences at the University of Twente is looking for a Postdoc with a background in Ethnography of borders and/or migration to join the ERC-funded project ‘Processing Citizenship: Digital registration of migrants as co-production of citizens, territory and Europe’ (ProcessCitizenship), with Dr. Annalisa Pelizza as Principal Investigator.

Project and work description
‘Processing Citizenship’ investigates the information infrastructure for migrant registration at and across European borders, focusing on how citizenship, modernist institutions and territory are co-produced.

Intensifying migration waves are changing EU policies―with Hotspots being set up in frontline countries―but also the way knowledge about migrants, institutions and territory is created. Information systems are key enablers of this knowledge. They materialize legislative, political, administrative dynamics in which citizenship, state and borders are co-produced. ProcessingCitizenship aims to establish information systems as ‘interfaces’ that make visible changes in the modern nation state. It aims to develop a history of the present that accounts for contemporary materially-embedded practices of registration of migrants at Hotspots as activities of governance formation.
The project combines border studies and surveillance studies in IT and migration with a materialist performative approach derived from science and technology studies and media geography. Data will be collected via qualitative and computational techniques.

We offer a trans-disciplinary, interactive and international research environment in a leading Science and Technology Studies (STS) department. The appointee will be a key member of a team of eight, working in close relationship with the Principal Investigator. The project’s framework being given, s/he will have the opportunity to independently take day-to-day decisions and plan responsibilities.

Activities
The postdoctoral researcher will work with the Principal Investigator in further developing the theoretical and methodological framework. Together with the PI, s/he will train the team of three PhD students in ethnographic and qualitative interviewing methodologies, and co-supervise them.

Fieldwork research will be conducted mainly at Hotspots for migrant registration in Greece and Italy. It will consist of participant observation of identification and registration practices, focusing on the techno-social settings, and qualitative interviews with migrants about their everyday experiences with the registration system.

As part of the team, the appointee will support communication and organizational activities related to the project, and participate in publishing and conferential initiatives.

Profile
The ideal candidate has a PhD (or equivalent) degree in anthropology, constructivist sociology, political science, human geography or neighbouring disciplines, and demonstrable experience in ethnographic methodologies and migration/border research. The candidate must be fluent in English and preferably in another language as specified below. Knowledge of Dutch is not a requirement.

Essential:
• PhD completed at the latest by September 2017
• Demonstrable knowledge of border/migration studies and on-field experience of ethnographic methodologies
• Demonstrable experience of and willingness to embark in international fieldwork research
• Commitment to the project’s success, willingness to collaborate in a research team and write joint publications
• Excellent organizational skills, including the ability to plan one’s and others’ work and meet deadlines
• Record of topical publications
• Sound understanding of the potential non-academic impacts of the research and ways of engaging with it
• Familiarity with management of resources and willingness to accept Horizon2020 administrative and ethical behaviour

Desirable
• Linguistic fluency either in Arabic (strongly desirable), modern Greek or Italian
• Research experience after PhD
• Knowledge of major STS approaches and/or STS literature in information infrastructures
• Ability to think across disciplinary boundaries, creating an inclusive and creative culture

Conditions of employment
We offer a full-time contract (38 hours per week) spanning a period of 2 years. The appointee is expected to take office on June 1st, 2017 (although a later start date may be negotiated). Depending on relevant background and experience, the gross monthly salary on a full time basis ranges from € 3.427,- to € 4.514,- per month.

The terms of employment are in accordance with the Dutch Collective Labor Agreement for Universities (CAO). Employees are also entitled to a holiday allowance of 8% of the gross annual salary and an 8.3% end-of-year bonus. International employees are entitled to a 30% tax allowance.

We offer excellent auxiliary terms of employment, such as professional and personal development programs; a secondary remuneration package; a dynamic environment with enthusiastic colleagues; an organization focusing on internationalization and a high degree of responsibility and independence. Last but not least, the University of Twente combines a unique location at the core of Europe – with major cities easily reachable by train (e.g., Amsterdam, Berlin, Brussels, Düsseldorf and the Ruhr Area) – with a truly international academic environment and a high quality of life.

Application procedure
Applications should be submitted via https://www.utwente.nl/en/organization/careers/vacancies/!/vacature/816678 before January 8, 2017 h. 23:59 (CET).
Applications should include:
• a motivation letter describing why you would be a good fit for this project;
• a one-page description of your future research plans;
• curriculum vitae, including list of publications;
• one publication, preferably showing experience in ethnographic methodologies;
• two letters of reference, including referee contacts.

Only complete applications submitted by the deadline will be taken into consideration.
The first interview round will take place in the second half of January 2017. In case needed, a second round of interviews will be conducted in the first half of February 2017. For more information on this position please contact Dr. Annalisa Pelizza (Principal Investigator) a. pelizza@utwente.nl.

In case of equal qualifications, recruitment will be conducted with an attention to fostering gender, age, linguistic and national diversity. Hence, submissions from international candidates and/or from candidates from academically under-represented groups are welcome.

“Interdisciplinary Encounters: Exploring Knowledge-Making Across Boundaries”

March 10 2017 to March 11 2017 | University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Deadline: January 17 2017

http://seeingsystems.illinois.edu

Updated: December 08 2016

UIUC Graduate Science and Technology Studies Workshop

The Seeing Systems INTERSECT group is delighted to announce “Interdisciplinary Encounters: Exploring Knowledge-Making Across Boundaries” UIUC Graduate Science and Technology Studies (STS) Workshop. We invite scholars from across disciplines and regional locales whose work connects with STS, digital studies, media studies, communication, information sciences, informatics and design to submit proposals for a two-day workshop addressing diverse themes in the social making of facts, social histories of media and technology, user networks in practice, visual cultures and interactive technologies.

We welcome a range of formats — including standard paper presentations, posters, demonstrations, and hands-on workshops — as well as work intersectional with feminist, anti-racist, transnational, decolonial, queer, and ecological potentials in science and technology studies (STS) and in critical making. The event will also feature faculty-facilitated conversations, campus and nature walks, scavenging exercises, workshops on local citizen science, and keynotes by:

Jenny Reardon, director of The Science and Justice Research Center at the University of California – Santa Cruz, and Max Liboiron, founder of the Civic Laboratory for Environmental Action Research (CLEAR), a feminist marine biology and technology lab at Memorial University in Newfoundland.

We invite work representing a variety of regions and sites, and aim for a gathering that is aware of its context and the opportunities afforded by local contextual considerations for scholarship and research. And we underscore what midwest STS scholars have noted, while the Midwest is often overlooked as a “deindustrial periphery,” it has thriving technoscientific and political groundswells amongst its histories of settler-colonialism (including Black technocultures, independent media, femtech, citizen science, community making, and indigenous presence and practice).

We invite 500–800 word proposals for a variety of formats—from standard talks (15 min.) to hands-on activities with interdisciplinary methods (30–40 min.). Proposals should include a:

§ Preliminary title (10 words or less);

§ 5 keywords, concepts, or themes that your project can be tagged by;

§ Description of the content and style of your presentation (500 word max.);

§ Short personal/academic biography, which also elaborates on your interest in participating (300 word max.);

§ Any details about the potential space and tech needs of your paper/project/workshop.

Please submit your proposal by January 17, 2017 via the online form at: https://illinois.edu/fb/sec/8043933.

* For any questions, contact SeeingSystemsUIUC@gmail.com.

We aim to finalize participants by February 15, 2017. Please see publish.illinois.edu/seeingsystems for further information about the workshop.






How online media are changing science communication

Deadline: May 01 2017

mc.manuscriptcentral.com/sc.

Updated: December 08 2016

Call for papers for a special issue of Science Communication Public science in a wired world
Guest Editors: Sarah R Davies (University of Copenhagen), Joachim Allgaier (Alpen-Adria University Klagenfurt), and Noriko Hara (Indiana University).

Science communication – public dissemination and debate of scientific knowledge – is increasingly taking place online. From the websites of scientific organizations such as universities or scholarly societies to social media platforms such as YouTube, Facebook groups or Reddit, science is negotiated by public audiences in online spaces alongside traditional formats such as the mass media, public lectures, or popular science writing. Social research is starting to engage with these spaces and tools, and to understand how science communication is produced and consumed in digital and social media. Recent work has, for example, explored how authority is negotiated in science blogs (Riesch & Mendel 2013), what kind of science is presented online (Brossard 2013), how Twitter is used to engage with scientific projects (Gastrow 2015; Kahle et al 2016), or how blogging is used to manage scientific identity (Steinke 2013). As of yet, however, there has been no dedicated volume or special issue devoted to science communication in digital and social media, and this emergent body of research remains dispersed. This special issue will showcase cutting edge research in online science communication and thereby consolidate and draw together this emerging field.

Potential focus areas for papers (which may use any recognized systematic methodological approach, whether qualitative or quantitative) might include (but are not limited to):

* Science videos on YouTube, TED or other platforms; * Science as a social media phenomenon (such as Facebook pages or science on Twitter); * Science blogging by scientists or non-scientists; * University websites and online branding activities; * The role of science journalism in an online era; * Online public information campaigns (such as Science: It’s a Girl Thing!); * Discussion forums and online dialogue and debate by scientists or non-scientists.

We welcome papers that interrogate these developments by critically exploring, for instance, how online media are affecting scientific authority, the visions of science that are being constructed through online communication, the reception and interpretation of science online, or how online science communication is managed, produced and/or misused.

Full papers are due May 1, 2017, for publication likely in late 2017 or early 2018. Earlier submissions are very strongly encouraged. Mention the special issue in your cover letter. Late papers may be considered if extra space is available. Papers should follow the Science Communication guidelines for length and format; submit at mc.manuscriptcentral.com/sc. Our ideal manuscript is between 7,000 and 9,000 words, inclusive of notes, references, and other material. Additional guidelines can be found at scx.sagepub.com. Queries regarding the special issue can be addressed to the guest editors (Sarah Davies, Joachim Allgaier, and Noriko Hara; contact at srdavies@hum.ku.dk) or to the journal’s editor, Susanna Priest, at editorscicom@gmail.com.

References Brossard D (2013) New media landscapes and the science information consumer. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 110(Supplement 3): 14096–14101. Gastrow M (2015) Science and the Social Media in an African Context The Case of the Square Kilometre Array Telescope. Science Communication 37(6): 703–722. Kahle K, Sharon AJ and Baram-Tsabari A (2016) Footprints of Fascination: Digital Traces of Public Engagement with Particle Physics on CERN’s Social Media Platforms. PLOS ONE 11(5): e0156409. Riesch H and Mendel J (2013) Science Blogging: Networks, Boundaries and Limitations. Science as Culture 23(1): 51–72. Steinke J (2013) In Her Own Voice: Identity Centrality and Perceptions of Workplace Climate in Blogs by Women Scientists. International Journal of Gender, Science and Technology 5(1): 25–51.

8th Tensions of Europe Conference

September 07 2017 to September 10 2017 | Athens

Deadline: February 15 2017

http://8toe2017.phs.uoa.gr

Updated: December 08 2016

2nd Call for Papers: Borders and Technology. The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference will have as its main theme the history of borders and technology. We invite papers studying the history of the relationship between national borders and transnational infrastructures, hidden technological linking and delinking that reinforced or challenged border delineations and demarcations, the relationship between borders and technologically-induced environmental crises and disasters, the virtualization of borders and the territories that they contain through the use of electronic and related technologies, geopolitics and technology, the redefinition of borders due to the use of technology (and vice versa), all the way from the production to the circulation and use of goods and commodities. One central aim is to cross-fertilize between disciplines and we therefore invite contributions from a wide variety of historical disciplines as well as from fields like Migration and Border Studies, Migration History, Mobility History, etc, especially in connection to borders and migrations from, to and within Europe.

Themes that fall under the general agenda of the Tensions of Europe network are very welcomed (e.g. transnational histories of technology, history of European infrastructures and networks, environment and technology, the democracy-technology relationship, conflicting interests and technology, technology and hidden integration, technology and culture, gender and technology, technology and ethnicity, technology and disability).

Tensions of Europe has a long tradition of fostering alternative meeting formats. We encourage proposals for non-traditional sessions with different formats and new ideas (e.g. round tables, agenda-building sessions, brainstorm sessions, break-out groups with assignments, poster discussion, film discussion, event-based sessions). As long as quality can be demonstrated, the program committee will not prioritize between formats. By quality we mean suggestions that promise constructive, stimulating and engaging discussion.

Fully-funded 4-year Ph.D. position on Fearful Technologies, TU Eindhoven

Deadline: January 01 2017

http://jobs.tue.nl/en/vacancy/-phd-position-on-fearful-technologies-286591.html

Updated: November 22 2016

Fully-funded 4-year Ph.D. position on "Fearful Technologies: Historical and ethical perspectives on the role of fear in pro-technology discourses"

The PhD position is interdisciplinary with a shared advisory team from the Technology, Innovation and Society Group (dr. Kalmbach, prof.dr. v.d. Vleuten) and the Philosophy & Ethics Group (dr. Spahn) of the Department of Industrial Engineering and Innovation Sciences at Eindhoven University of Technology and has a focus on the historical and ethical perspectives on the role of fear in pro-technology discourses. We invite applications for a 4-year fully funded PhD starting at the latest in June 2017.

Research Context
Fears of technologies are a prominent research topic in Science and Technology Studies and Risk Research. Industry, academia, and policy makers have been eager to develop strategies to overcome such fears. An area that has, however, been neglected so far is the question how the promotion of new technologies has itself appealed to fears. To name only a few examples: The fear that 'the lights could go out' has been addressed continuously in the promotion of nuclear energy; the fear that one could miss out on the meaning of life is stressed in the promotion of in-vitro-fertilization; and the fear that the world's knowledge could get lost is emphasized in the calls for digital archives.

Our project will therefore investigate the argumentative role of fear in pro-technology discourses and the effects of these appeals to fear. It will bring together research from history and ethics of technology. The main research question will be: Which role did and do emotions, and especially fear play (historically) in the pro-technology discourse of emerging technologies and how should these appeals to fear be evaluated from an ethical perspective? We will investigate this question on the basis of empirical case studies and in relation to the ethical debate on the role of emotions and fear in technology acceptance.

Your Profile
The candidate holds a Master’s degree or equivalent degree in one of the following fields: History (of Technology / Sciences), Philosophy, Sciences and Technology Studies, Innovation Studies, or related fields. The candidate has excellent writing and qualitative analytic skills, fluency in English (which is the working language of the research group), and a strong interest in conducting research in an interdisciplinary and international team. The candidate should be able to take up the position latest by June 1.

The TU/e is an equal opportunity employee. Members of underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply.


Our Offer
We offer a four-year PhD position in a vibrating research environment which is shaped by an interdisciplinary and international team of researchers and their tight integration in (inter)national research networks. The position comes with a gross salary of € 2.191 per month in the first year, increasing to €2.801 per month in the fourth year. Additionally, Eindhoven University of Technology provides excellent facilities for professional and personal development, a holiday allowance (amounts to 8% of the annual salary), an end-of-year bonus (amounts to 8,3%), and a number of additional benefits. The candidate will be given the possibility to gain teaching experience as well as to receive graduate training.

Application
The application should contain the following documents:
- a letter of motivation which explains your interest in the position and your qualifications for it;
- a curriculum vitae (including, if applicable, a publication list and a teaching overview)
- a research statement (roughly 500 words, plus (short!) bibliography) in which you elaborate on your ideas for a research focus in line with the project
- names and contact information of three persons willing to provide references.


If you are interested in this position, we invite you to apply before January 1, 2017. To apply please click http://jobs.tue.nl/en/vacancy/-phd-position-on-fearful-technologies-286591.html and use the ‘apply now’ button. Please note that a maximum of 5 documents can be uploaded, so if you have more than 5 documents you will have to combine them. Please do not send us applications by e-mail. Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed in Eindhoven (travel expenses will be covered) or via a video call end of January 2017, decision about the appointment will be made shortly after the interviews. The appointment is initially for a period of one year; contingent on satisfactory performance, the position will be extended by a maximum of an additional three years leading to the completion of a PhD thesis.

IEEE History Center Life Member Internship for 2017

Deadline: March 01 2017

http://www.ieee.org/about/history_center/internship.html

Updated: November 22 2016

Scholars near the beginning of their career studying the history of electrical technology and computing and related fields are invited to contact the Center to be considered for a paid Internship at the Center's offices on the campus of Stevens Institute of technology in Hoboken, New Jersey, USA.

The intern program seeks to provide research experience for young scholars (generally advance undergraduates or beginning graduate students) in the history of technology, while enlisting their help for the Center's projects. The Intern generally works full-time for two months at the History Center on a Center project that is connected to his or her own area of interest. This time is usually during the summer, but other arrangements will be considered. Interns are also encouraged to consult with the Center's staff and its associates, and guided to research resources in the area. The stipend paid to the intern is US$5,000. This internship is supported by the IEEE Life Members Committee, and was recently enhanced by a gift from Emerson Pugh.

There is no formal application form. To apply, please email a curriculum vitae showing your studies in electrical history or related field, a three- to five-page page writing sample, and a cover letter describing the sort of project you would be interested in doing and why it would benefit from being conducted at the IEEE History Center. Complete information is available at http://www.ieee.org/about/history_center/internship.html.

The Center can be contacted at: IEEE History Center, S. C. Williams Library 350, 1 Castle Point Terrace, Hoboken, NJ 07030, ieee-history@ieee.org, +1 732 562 5450

IEEE and Stevens Institute of Technology are AA/EO employers. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply for all positions. The IEEE History Center is cosponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE)—the world’s largest professional technical society—, and Stevens Institute of technology, The Innovation University (although the position is through IEEE). The mission of the Center is to preserve, research, and promote the legacy of electrical engineering and computing.

IEEE Life Member Fellowship in History of Electrical and Computing Technology for 2017–2018

Deadline: February 01 2017

http://www.ieee.org/web/aboutus/history_center/about/fellowship.html

Updated: November 22 2016

The Fellowship supports one year of full-time graduate work in the history of electrical science and technology or closely related field at a college or university of recognized standing, or up to one year of post-doctoral research for a scholar in this field who has received his or her Ph.D. within the past four years. Recipients are normally expected to take up the Fellowship in the July of the year that it is awarded. The stipend is $17,000, with a research budget of up to $3,000. The IEEE Fellowship in History of Electrical and Computing Technology is funded by the IEEE Life Members’ Committee.

Candidates with undergraduate degrees in engineering, the sciences, or the humanities/social sciences are eligible for the fellowship. For pre-doctoral applicants, however, the award is conditional upon the candidate’s good standing in an appropriate in an appropriate PhD granting graduate program. In addition, pre-doctoral recipients may not concurrently hold other fellowships, but they may earn up to $10,000 for work that is directly related to their graduate studies. Pre-doctoral fellows must pursue full-time graduate work and evidence of satisfactory academic performance is required. These restrictions do not apply to post-doctoral applicants. Post-doctoral applicants must be no more than four years from the award of their PhD on the date the application is due. The Fellow is selected on the basis of the candidate's potential for pursuing research in, and contributing to, electrical, engineering and/or computing history. Applicants pursuing technical topics should demonstrate they possess the necessary skills, for example: knowledge of programming languages or mathematical discipline. Such knowledge can be demonstrated through course work or experience.

Complete information and application forms are available on-line at http://www.ieee.org/web/aboutus/history_center/about/fellowship.html. The deadline for completed applications is 1 February 2017. Inquiries can also be sent to ieee-history@ieee.org.

The Center can be contacted at: IEEE History Center, S. C. Williams Library 350, 1 Castle Point Terrace, Hoboken, NJ 07030, ieee-history@ieee.org, +1 732 562 5450

IEEE and Stevens Institute of Technology are AA/EO employers. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply for all positions. The IEEE History Center is cosponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE)—the world’s largest professional technical society—, and Stevens Institute of technology, The Innovation University (although the position is through IEEE). The mission of the Center is to preserve, research, and promote the legacy of electrical engineering and computing.

Tenure track Assistant Professor in Art/Science Nexus, Arizona State University

Updated: November 21 2016

Arizona State University’s School for the Future of Innovation in Society (SFIS) and its Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts (HIDA) seek an assistant professor (tenure track) scholar/practitioner who works at the art/science nexus.

We seek someone who thinks about futures, possible worlds, and the governance of innovation by combining artistic and technoscientific methods, transforming disciplinary practice and considering real-world impacts. We especially seek candidates with professional experience who accomplish these outcomes by inventing new technologies, genres of dialogue, narrative, performance and/or events – imagining futures and creating fresh techniques for imagining futures. Ideally, candidates will also be comfortable with some techniques of scientific or engineering research and be able to reflect critically, socio-culturally or artistically on those techniques. The successful candidate will be expected to develop an independently funded and collaborative research program; teach and mentor students; participate in professional and university service; and engage stakeholders.

As part of his or her activities, the successful candidate – along with colleagues from SFIS, HIDA, and elsewhere – will be responsible for shaping and collaboratively mounting an annual, trans-genre event at ASU called “Emerge” (see: http://emerge.asu.edu). The relevant unit within HIDA will most likely be the School of Arts, Media and Engineering (AME), but candidates with backgrounds across the arts should feel free to apply.

Required: PhD or appropriate terminal degree in an area of research-creation-curation. Experience in producing experimental performance, transmedia story-telling, experiential futures, design fiction or other relevant techniques, media arts, performances or events. Commitment to transforming artistic practice, scientific methods, innovation governance and/or futures thinking transdisciplinary collaborations. Evidence of ability to inspire and instruct students from diverse backgrounds. Ability to communicate in and across multiple epistemic cultures.

Desired: Experience collaborating with colleagues from different disciplines to grow dynamic academic programs.

As the newest element of ASU’s approach to building a “New American University” (http://newamericanuniversity.asu.edu/), SFIS (http://sfis.asu.edu) provides robust opportunities for intellectual fusion, use-inspired research, and global engagement via ongoing projects and centers. SFIS hosts a variety of graduate degrees including a Ph.D. in Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology and a Master of Science degree in Global Technology and Development, and in 2016 it will introduce an undergraduate major, minor and certificate. The planned research center will be part of the Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes (CSPO; http://www.cspo.org) - consistently ranked one of the top science and technology policy think tanks in the world – and the emerging Institute for the Future of Innovation in Society.

The Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts (http://herbergerinstitute.asu.edu/) is the largest comprehensive design and arts school in the nation, located within a dynamic 21st-century research university. With 4,700+ students, nearly 400 faculty members, 125 program options and a tradition of top-ranked programs, we are committed to redefining the 21st-century design and arts school. Our college is built on a combination of disciplines unlike any other program in the nation, comprising schools of art; arts, media + engineering; design; film, dance and theatre; and music; as well as the ASU Art Museum. Through recognizing that design and the arts are critical resources for transforming society and solving complex problems, the Herberger Institute is committed to positioning artists, scholars, designers, and educators at the center of public life.

To apply, please submit: 1) a detailed cover letter that includes a description of the applicant's research and teaching interests and experience (limited to 4 pages); 2) a current Curriculum Vitae; and 3) the names, email addresses and telephone numbers of three references. All materials should be submitted as a single PDF document to sfis@asu.edu. Review of applications will begin December 30, 2016 if not filled, a review will occur every Friday thereafter until the search is closed. A background check is required for employment.

Arizona State University is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer committed to excellence through diversity (see ASU’s Prohibition Against Discrimination, Harassment, and Retaliation policy at http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd401.html). All qualified applicants will be considered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other basis protected by law (see ASU’s Title IX policy at https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/). Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

ESRC Funded PhD studentships, Cardiff School of Social Sciences

Deadline: February 01 2017

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/funding-and-fees/view/wales-dtp-esrc-phd-studentships-in-social-sciences

Updated: November 16 2016

The Cardiff School of Social Sciences has a number of ESRC funded PhD studentships, including opportunities in Science and Technology Studies. Details of the awards, eligibility and how to apply are available from:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/funding-and-fees/funding-options/research-councils/esrc-wales-doctoral-training-centre

and then click on the link for 'studentships in social sciences'

The deadline for complete applications is 1st February 2017 but please contact prospective supervisors before that. The Graduate Office, (graduateoffice@cardiff.ac.uk) can also help with questions about the application process.

New book by David J Hess, Undone Science (2016, MIT Press)

https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/undone-science

Updated: November 12 2016

New book by David J Hess, Undone Science: Social Movements, Mobilized Publics, and Industrial Transitions (2016, MIT Press)

As the fields of social movement studies (SMS) and science and technology studies (STS) have diversified in topical focus, they have moved closer to each other. SMS has turned toward the study of nonstate targets and institutionalized repertoires of action, just as STS has turned to expertise and publics. In Undone Science, David Hess argues that a theoretical integration of core concepts in the two fields is now possible, and he presents just such a synthesis. Hess focuses on industrial transition movements—mobilized counterpublics of activists, advocates, entrepreneurs, and other agents of change—and examines several areas of common ground between the two fields relevant to these movements. His account reveals the problem of “undone science”—areas of research potentially valuable to the goals of industrial transition movements that have been systematically ignored.

Each chapter begins with a problem in SMS, discusses the relevant STS literature, describes new concepts and findings that have emerged, and offers applications to examples that range from nanotechnology and climate science denialism to conflicts based on race, class, and gender. Topics include the epistemic dimension of the political opportunity structure, networks of counterpublic knowledge, and regime resistance in industrial transition.

STGlobal Consortium

March 24 2017 to March 25 2017 | Washington, DC

Deadline: January 13 2017

www.stglobal.org

Updated: November 10 2016

17th Annual Student Conference •US STGlobal is a consortium of graduate and undergraduate programs focused on exploring the worlds of science policy and science, technology and society.

The STGlobal consortium presents its annual conference in Washington DC, in the scenic academic settings of the National Academy of Sciences and American Association for the Advancement of Science. The conference is run entirely by student volunteers and aims to create an environment for the presentation of work from emerging student-scholars.

STGlobal’s 17th annual event continues the chronicle of a unique opportunity for interdisciplinary collegial exchange. The conference attracts hundreds of students from around the world with diverse interests in Science, Technology and Society (STS) or Science and Technology Policy (STP) each year. The independent, student-led organizing committee also awards travel funds for those that are not located around the Greater Washington DC Metropolitan Area.

STGlobal inspires and challenges graduate students to contribute to discussions at the forefront of research in STP and STS, during any stage of the research process.

The Conference allows students three avenues to present their research: as part of a proposed full panel, as a paper presentation, or as a poster.

Submissions We welcome abstracts on completed research or works-in-progress on issues relevant to science & technology policy (STP) and science, technology and society (STS). We encourage submissions that highlight creative research and methodologies (ethnography, visual studies, digital media, etc.) in areas such as health, energy, sustainability, social justice, education, space studies, innovation, public policy, ethics, and the intersections between science, technology and the humanities. The above list is in no way exhaustive of the many topics within STS & STP scholarship. Paper Abstracts

Paper abstracts should be no longer than 300 words and demonstrate your paper’s connection to themes within STS and STP. We encourage submissions that highlight creative research and methodologies that work to bring STS in conversation with areas such as (but not limited to) health, energy, sustainability, social justice, education, space studies, innovation, public policy, ethics, governance, and the many intersections between science, technology, policy, and the humanities. All papers will also be considered for poster presentations. Panels

STGlobal accepts proposals for full panel presentations. Panels are built around a unifying theme, contain a minimum of three paper abstracts, and optionally a possible discussant. A discussant is not required to submit a proposal for a panel presentation. Poster abstracts

Poster abstracts adhere to the general directions for paper abstracts. Poster presentations most often consist of undergraduate research in STS and STP, but Graduate Students preferring a poster format are welcome to apply. These presentations normally take place during a larger poster session and allow students the opportunity to converse directly about their work with peers and consortium faculty. Eligibility

Papers, panels and poster abstracts are open to students currently enrolled in a graduate or undergraduate program at any institution around the world at the time of submitting an abstract.

SUBMIT ABSTRACTS HERE Deadline January 13th, 2017, midnight EST

Conference registration here

Further information
You can email us at contact@stglobal.org

Call for Papers: SIGCIS at CHM

March 18 2017 to March 19 2017 | Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California

Deadline: December 30 2016

meetings.sigcis.org

Updated: November 10 2016

Command Lines: Software, Power, and Performance
With invited keynotes: Kavita Philip (UC Irvine) and Tom Mullaney (Stanford)

The Computer History Museum (CHM) will host a meeting of the Society for the History of Technology’s (SHOT) Special Interest Group for Computing, Information and Society (SIGCIS) at the Museum over the weekend of March 18-19, 2017.

Purpose and Theme The purpose of the meeting, Command Lines: Software, Power, and Performance, is to draw together scholars from a variety of fields that study software, including the history of computing, science and technology studies, software studies, code studies, game studies, media studies, the study of women, gender and sexuality; studies of race, ethnicity and postcoloniality; network and internet histories; and computer science and engineering. The meeting hopes to explore the connections between the creation and use of software and “power” in multiple senses, and the connection between software and conceptions of technical and cultural “performance.”

The SIGCIS organizing committee now seeks proposals for short papers (15-20 min.) to present new work at the conference. We welcome work that hinges on, links to, or reacts against the themes of the meeting. We also welcome submissions that may not connect specifically with the themes but have bearing on the larger project of SIGCIS--the study of computing and sociotechnical change. We especially encourage submissions from graduate students and early career scholars.

Deadlines and Submission Protocol Proposals for papers are due by December 30th, 2016. Decisions will be made by January 16th, 2017. Proposals should include:

a one-page abstract (maximum 400 words) addressing the paper's topic, approach, sources, and relationship to existing literatures a one-page CV

Please email your proposal to SIGCIS organizing committee by midnight (Pacific time) on December 30th to Conference Assistant kera.allen@gatech.edu. Register and follow news and details for Command Lines at meetings.sigcis.org.

Location and Logistics The meeting events will be held at CHM at 1401 North Shoreline Boulevard, Mountain View, CA 94043. During the event, attendees will have access to CHM’s most recent major exhibit on software and its implications, Make Software: Change the World!

There will be no official meeting hotel or transportation. The meeting has a $40 registration fee, waived for graduate and undergraduate students as well as independent scholars. We encourage early registration, as attendance will be limited.

SIGCIS and the Museum will be able to provide partial financial support to graduate students to present at the meeting. Please note in your proposal if you would like to be considered for a travel award.

The event is sponsored by the Computer History Museum’s Center for Software History: www.computerhistory.org/softwarehistory

This event is organized by the SIGCIS Conferences Committee: David C. Brock (dbrock@computerhistory.org) Marie Hicks (mhicks1@iit.edu) Laine Nooney (laine.nooney@gmail.com) Andrew Russell (arussell@arussell.org)

Techniques of the Corporation

May 04 2017 to May 07 2017 | University of Toronto Technoscience Research Unit

Deadline: January 13 2017

Updated: November 10 2016

Conference organization Justin Douglas, Bretton Fosbrook, Kira Lussier, Michelle Murphy

How do corporations know themselves and their world? Over the last 150 years, corporations, like universities and laboratories, have generated an abundance of knowledge-making techniques in the form of psychological tests, efficiency technologies, scenario planning, and logistical systems. As dominant forms of the last century, corporations are assembled with instruments, infrastructures, and interventions that arrange and rearrange the dynamics of capitalism. These techniques of the corporation have filtered into our daily lives, influencing everyday understandings of self, inequality, environment, and society.

Techniques of the Corporation will assemble an interdisciplinary network of established and emerging scholars whose work contributes to the critical study of the techniques, epistemologies, and imaginaries of the 20th-century corporation. This conference aims to foster a timely conversation between Science and Technology Studies (STS) approaches and the recent histories of capitalism. We treat the corporation in the same way that historians of science and STS scholars have approached science, colonialism, and militarism as generative sites for knowledge production, value-making, and technopolitics. The conference takes as its starting place North American corporations with the understanding that corporations are multinational forms with complex transnational histories. Building from the recent history of capitalism, we attend to the entangled genealogies of corporations with slavery, exploitation, environmental destruction, colonialism, and inequality.

Hosted by the Technoscience Research Unit at the University of Toronto, this event will be an intimate multi-day conversation between established and emerging scholars in the fields of STS, history of science, and the history of capitalism. Techniques of the Corporation will be headlined by keynote speaker Joseph Dumit, and features invited talks by Dan Bouk, Elspeth Brown, Deborah Cowen, Orit Halpern, Louis Hyman, Michelle Murphy, Martha Poon, and Elise Thorburn. The conference will be an immersive experience in the Greater Toronto Area with meals and cocktails provided.

We invite emerging and established scholars in diverse fields (including business history; labour history; anthropology; geography; economic sociology; media studies; critical race studies; architecture studies; feminist and sexuality studies; environmental studies; and cultural studies) to explore the techniques, epistemologies, and imaginaries of corporations. Our overall goal is to crystallize a new field, culminating in a field-defining publication. We welcome work on corporate practices that exceed calculative logics, such as work on social relations, affective and psychological states, and speculative futurities. In addition to traditional papers, the conference encourages creative methods to query corporate forms, including art installations, videos, interactive multimedia projects, and role-playing games. Applications for travel assistance will be arranged after acceptance.


Corporate practices, include, but are not limited to:
management. sharing economy, data management, marketing, risk management, corporate culture. planning, corporate responsibility, consulting, infrastructure, sustainability, research and development, logistics, corporate design,
intellectual property, gaming, precarity, affective labor, racial surveillance, architecture,transnational capital,
Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words and a CV to the conference organizers at corporatetechniques@gmail.com by 13 January 2017.

New Book from Suryanarayanan and Kleinman: Vanishing Bees (2016, Rutgers University Press)

http://rutgerspress.rutgers.edu/product/Vanishing-Bees,6099.aspx

Updated: October 31 2016

Description:

In 2005, beekeepers in the United States began observing a mysterious and disturbing phenomenon: once-healthy colonies of bees were suddenly collapsing, leaving behind empty hives full of honey and pollen. Over the following decade, widespread honeybee deaths—some of which have come to be called Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD)—have continued to bedevil beekeepers and threaten the agricultural industries that rely on bees for pollination. Scientists continue to debate the causes of CCD, yet there is no clear consensus on how to best solve the problem.

Vanishing Bees takes us inside the debates over widespread honeybee deaths, introducing the various groups with a stake in solving the mystery of CCD, including beekeepers, entomologists, growers, agrichemical companies, and government regulators. Drawing from extensive interviews and first-hand observations, Sainath Suryanarayanan and Daniel Lee Kleinman examine how members of each group have acquired, disseminated, and evaluated knowledge about CCD. In addition, they explore the often-contentious interactions among different groups, detailing how they assert authority, gain trust, and build alliances.

As it explores the contours of the CCD crisis, Vanishing Bees considers an equally urgent question: what happens when farmers, scientists, beekeepers, corporations, and federal agencies approach the problem from different vantage points and cannot see eye-to-eye? The answer may have profound consequences for every person who wants to keep fresh food on the table.

You can get a brief sense of the book in this YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3k8p6P0zDgU

If interested, you can order the book from Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/Vanishing-Bees-Science-Politics-Honeybee/dp/0813574587/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1476892033&sr=8-3&keywords=vanishing+bees) or Rutgers University Press (http://rutgerspress.rutgers.edu/pr…/Vanishing-Bees,6099.aspx).

Faculty, Integrated Digital Media, Technology, Culture, and Society (TCS) Department, NYU

http://apply.interfolio.com/38864

Updated: October 24 2016

The Technology, Culture, and Society (TCS) Department at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering invites outstanding applicants for a full-time tenured or tenure track appointment at open rank within the Integrated Digital Media (IDM) program.

We invite applications from candidates who have a strong commitment to excellence in research, teaching, and university service. We will consider applicants in all areas of digital media, but with a preference for individuals with research and teaching interests at the intersection of engineering and creative practice, including, but not limited to: assistive technology, digital fabrication, physical and wearable computing, human-computer interaction, machine learning and applied media, interactive installation, motion capture or real-time live performance. The candidate should be committed to all levels of teaching, from introductory undergraduates to graduate students.

The applicant must have:
● A terminal degree in the field or a related field, Ph.D. strongly preferred.
● Candidates with a hybrid academic background (e.g., degrees in engineering and arts) are especially encouraged to apply;
● Demonstrate the ability to develop and lead high-quality research and to attract external funding
● Demonstrate excellence in teaching and service.

Interested applicants should submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, web portfolio, separate statements about your research and teaching philosophy and contact information for three professional references.

The position will be open until filled. Due to the high volume of applications, only those selected for interview will be contacted. Applications can be submitted to: http://apply.interfolio.com/38864

The faculty and students of Integrated Digital Media (IDM) in the Tandon School of Engineering are at the forefront of research within the Brooklyn Research Triangle and have access to a world-class facility at the NYU Media and Games Network (MAGNET), alongside programs from the Tisch Game Center, Steinhardt Education Technology, the Courant Institute, and the Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP), as well as key collaborations with other divisions of NYU.

New York University (NYU) is one of the top private universities in the United States, and the Tandon School of Engineering has the distinct history of having been known previously as Brooklyn Poly and the NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering. The School of Engineering has a strong tradition of commitment to diversity, and has proudly educated generations of Americans who are first in their families to earn a college degree.
New York University is an Equal Opportunity Employer. NYU does not discriminate due to race, color, creed, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender and/or gender identity or expression, marital or parental status, national origin, ethnicity, citizenship status, veteran or military status, age, disability, unemployment status or any other legally protected basis, and to the extent permitted by law. Qualified candidates of diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds are encouraged to apply for vacant positions at all levels.

Industry Assistant or Industry Associate Professor, Science and Technology Studies, NYU

http://apply.interfolio.com/38867

Updated: October 24 2016

The Department of Technology, Culture and Society at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering invites applications at the rank of Industry Assistant or Industry Associate Professor, depending on qualifications. New York University (NYU) is one of the top private universities in the United States, and the Tandon School of Engineering has the distinct history of having been known previously as Brooklyn Poly and the NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering. Industry professors have full-time, non-tenure track, renewable appointments. The Department of Technology, Culture, and Society is an interdisciplinary department offering three undergraduate majors in Science and Technology Studies, Sustainable Urban Environments, and Integrated Digital Media, as well as a MS in Integrated Digital Media. It also offers general education courses that emphasize the intersection of the humanities and social sciences with technology.

Duties for this position include teaching undergraduate courses, and some duties to administer the department’s major in Science and Technology Studies. Applicants should hold a Ph.D. in Science and Technology Studies or a related discipline (for example History, Philosophy, or Anthropology of Technology) and have a record of excellence in teaching. We are particularly looking for applicants who can teach courses in fields that relate humanities and/or social sciences to technology. The strongest candidates will have a solid background in Science and Technology Studies, and may also contribute to one or more of the department’s other programs in Sustainable Urban Environments and Integrated Digital Media.

New York University is an Equal Opportunity Employer. NYU does not discriminate due to race, color, creed, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender and/or gender identity or expression, marital or parental status, national origin, ethnicity, citizenship status, veteran or military status, age, disability, unemployment status or any other legally protected basis, and to the extent permitted by law. Qualified candidates of diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds are encouraged to apply for vacant positions at all levels.

Applicants should submit an application letter, current C.V., teaching statement, and at least three letters of references to http://apply.interfolio.com/38867

7th Annual Student Conference

March 24 2017 to March 25 2017 | Washington, DC

Deadline: January 13 2017

http://stglobal.org/

Updated: October 10 2016

STGlobal Consortium •
STGlobal is a consortium of graduate and undergraduate programs focused on exploring the worlds of science policy and science, technology and society.

The STGlobal consortium presents its annual conference in Washington DC, in the scenic academic settings of the National Academy of Sciences and American Association for the Advancement of Science. The conference is run entirely by student volunteers and aims to create an environment for the presentation of work from emerging student-scholars. We are pleased to announce that the upcoming STGlobal Conference will be held on March 24th-25th, 2017.

STGlobal’s 17th annual event continues the chronicle of a unique opportunity for interdisciplinary collegial exchange. The conference attracts hundreds of students from around the world with diverse interests in Science, Technology and Society (STS) or Science and Technology Policy (STP) each year. The independent, student-led organizing committee also awards travel funds for those that are not located around the Greater Washington DC Metropolitan Area.

STGlobal inspires and challenges graduate students to contribute to discussions at the forefront of research in STP and STS, during any stage of the research process.

The Conference allows students three avenues to present their research: as part of a proposed full panel, as a paper presentation, or as a poster.

Submissions We welcome abstracts on completed research or works-in-progress on issues relevant to science & technology policy (STP) and science, technology and society (STS). We encourage submissions that highlight creative research and methodologies (ethnography, visual studies, digital media, etc.) in areas such as health, energy, sustainability, social justice, education, space studies, innovation, public policy, ethics, and the intersections between science, technology and the humanities. The above list is in no way exhaustive of the many topics within STS & STP scholarship. Paper Abstracts

Paper abstracts should be no longer than 300 words and demonstrate your paper’s connection to themes within STS and STP. We encourage submissions that highlight creative research and methodologies that work to bring STS in conversation with areas such as (but not limited to) health, energy, sustainability, social justice, education, space studies, innovation, public policy, ethics, governance, and the many intersections between science, technology, policy, and the humanities. All papers will also be considered for poster presentations. Panels

STGlobal accepts proposals for full panel presentations. Panels are built around a unifying theme, contain a minimum of three paper abstracts, and optionally a possible discussant. A discussant is not required to submit a proposal for a panel presentation. Poster abstracts

Poster abstracts adhere to the general directions for paper abstracts. Poster presentations most often consist of undergraduate research in STS and STP, but Graduate Students preferring a poster format are welcome to apply. These presentations normally take place during a larger poster session and allow students the opportunity to converse directly about their work with peers and consortium faculty. Eligibility

Papers, panels and poster abstracts are open to students currently enrolled in a graduate or undergraduate program at any institution around the world at the time of submitting an abstract.

SUBMIT ABSTRACTS HERE: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/11SGxK9QQNgIYyIh98EXdrVKTo46fPrMYMUVG0DMMEo0/viewform?edit_requested=true
Deadline January 13th, 2017, midnight EST

Conference registration here

Further information

Visit www.stglobal.org. You can email us at contact@stglobal.org

CfP for Science as Culture (SaC) Forum: Economic Assumptions

Deadline: January 31 2017

Updated: October 07 2016

Forum Editor: Kean Birch

Economic assumptions underpin an enormous range of expert judgements regarding technoscience and beyond. Such assumptions frequently remain implicit, meaning that they are unaccountable despite being powerful influences on an array of decisions, policies, media representations, public engagements, professional expertise, etc. Examples of these assumptions include the following: how livelihoods relate to rising GDP; how human behaviour relates to competitive individualism; how government policies relate to notions of efficiency and cost-benefit analysis; how innovation relates to capital-intensive technology; how technology relates to social progress and societal benefits; how technoscientific development relates to financial returns; how successful product development relates to price, quality, public acceptance; etc. (Muniesa 2014; Birch 2016; Roy and King 2016). For all such issues, the underlying assumptions are normative and constitutive, even if claiming to be merely descriptive.

Some time ago scholars like Michel Callon (1998) and Donald MacKenzie (2001) turned an STS lens onto forms of economic expertise and knowledge; they highlighted how the economy is performatively constituted by economic ideas. Philip Mirowski (2011) and David Tyfield (2012) have sought to examine the changing political economy of research and innovation that has resulted from particular political-economic regimes, especially neoliberalism. Sunder Rajan (2012) and Collard and Dempsey (2013), have sought to understand the materialities of economic actors, objects, and understandings of the world. These perspectives represent only some ways that the constitutive relationship between economic assumptions and technoscience have been theorised in STS, e.g. as academic capitalism, neoliberal technoscience, or technoscientific capitalism (e.g. Berman 2012; Pellizzoni and Ylönen, 2012; Birch 2013).

These various perspectives highlight how economic assumptions increasingly (re)configure technoscientific priorities, funding regimes, organizational governance, politics and policies, artefacts and bodies, etc. In particular finance, financial markets, financial governance, and financialization are bound up with specific configurations of technoscientific research and innovation process, strategy, outcomes, and normative framings of the world. There is a growing need for STS to engage more with economic assumptions and their pervasive manifestations. If we do not develop our own critical competency, then by default we end up reproducing implicit or dominant economic assumptions.

Given that technoscience and economics are increasingly entangled as ontological and epistemic objects, as knowledges, and as practices, more work is necessary to unpack the economic assumptions underpinning technoscience. This raises two important questions for STS: How might STS scholars theorise the economic assumptions implicit in technoscience? And in its academic analysis? In what ways are the logics, subjectivities, and publics constituting economic assumptions and technoscience increasingly blurred?

This forum seeks to engage STS scholars in an analysis of economic assumptions, especially their roles in science, technology, innovation, and expertise more generally. For this SaC Forum, articles should address the above questions, which can be elaborated through these topics:

· How economic assumptions underpin particular expert and policy judgements

· How economic assumptions are kept implicit, made explicit or actively contested

· How economic assumptions configure and reconfigure technoscience, and vice versa

· Normative stances implied (or made explicit) in economic assumptions, especially as regards technoscience

· Co-production of specific economic assumptions and specific technoscience

· How STS can engage with economic claims, expertise, and assumptions

· The political and normative role of STS in challenging different forms of economic expertise and assumptions

· Theoretical value of concepts like technoscientific capitalism or neoliberal technoscience

· Constitution of concepts like technoscientific capitalism by specific logics, expertise, subjectivities, and publics

As an example, please see Kean’s recent article “Rethinking value in the bio-economy: Finance, assetization, and the management of value” in Science, Technology, and Human Values.

Details
· Deadline: end of January 2017.

· Length: length is flexible, ranging between 2k-6k words.

· Format: author’s contact details (postal address and email address) should be at the top of the file; articles should contain an introduction and conclusion, but are otherwise flexible.

· Contact: please email Kean Birch (keanbirch@gmail.com) with queries about suitability and such like.

· Submission: send submissions to both Les Levidow (L.Levidow@open.ac.uk) and Kean Birch (keanbirch@gmail.com); articles will be reviewed by both Les and Kean, but will not be sent out for peer review.



Full-scale papers (10k words maximum) are also welcome. But these would need to follow the SaC editorial guidelines and undergo the normal referee procedure. If not ready in time for the Forum, they could be published in a later issue. See here, especially the guidelines for authors.

References

Berman, E.P. (2012) Creating the Market University, Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press

Birch, K. (2013) The political economy of technoscience: An emerging research agenda, Spontaneous Generations: A Journal for the History and Philosophy of Science 7(1): 49-61.

Birch, K. (2016) Rethinking value in the bio-economy: Finance, assetization and the management of value, Science, Technology and Human Values.

Callon, M. (ed.) (1998) The Laws of the Markets, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers.

Collard, R-C. and Dempsey, J. (2013) Life for sale? The politics of lively commodities, Environment and Planning A 45 (11): 2682-2699.

MacKenzie, D. (2001) Physics and Finance: S-Terms and modern finance as a topic for science studies, Science, Technology, & Human Values 26: 115-144.

Mirowski, P. (2011) ScienceMart, Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press.

Muniesa, F. (2014) The Provoked Economy, London: Routledge.

Pellizzoni, L. and Ylönen, M., eds (2012) Neoliberalism and Technoscience: Critical Assessments, Ashgate.

Roy, V. and King, L. (2016) Betting on hepatitis C: how financial speculation in drug development influences access to medicines, BMJ; i3718 DOI: 10.1136/bmj.i3718

Sunder Rajan, K. (ed.) (2012) Lively Capital: Biotechnologies, Ethics and Governance in Global Markets, Duke University Press.

Tyfield, D. (2012) The Economics of Science, London: Routledge.

Special Issue of Qualitative Inquiry

Deadline: December 01 2016

https://uk.sagepub.com/en-gb/eur/qualitative-inquiry/journal200797#submission-guidelines

Updated: October 07 2016

RESEARCHING INTIMACIES AND NEW MEDIA: METHODOLOGICAL OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES

Guest Editors: Katherine Harrison (University of Copenhagen, Denmark & Lund University, Sweden) & Maria Bee Christensen-Strynø (Roskilde University, Denmark)

Deadline for submission: 1 December 2016
New media are increasingly intersecting and intertwined with our daily lives, bodily and intimate practices, and relationships. This special issue will present contributions from researchers who are investigating practices of intimacy mediated either wholly or in part through new media. In particular, it will focus on the methodological issues involved in conducting qualitative research in this flourishing field.

A number of volumes published in the last decade have variously covered affect and methodology (e.g. Fraser and Puwar 2008; Pink 2009; Richardson 2005; Stage and Timm 2015), affect and new media (e.g. Chambers 2013; Garde-Hansen and Gorton 2013; Hillis at al 2015; Karatzogianni and Kuntsman 2012; McGlotten 2013; Paasonen 2011; Payne 2014; van Dijck 2013), or online methodologies (e.g. Hine 2000; Kozinets 2012; Markham and Baym 2009). This special issue builds on this existing body of scholarship and develops it further by narrowing the focus to methodological issues of research conducted on/with/through new media and specifically concerned with practices of intimacy. This special issue will zoom in on questions of method and methodology as they are experienced by researchers working at the cutting-edge of scholarship on intimacies and new media. It will share knowledge and experiences from the field, as well as proposing innovative methodological solutions and ideas on how to enter, survive and exit these highly charged fieldsites. Both personal experiences and reflections on current policies, procedures and paradigms will be welcomed.

Researching intimacies encompasses a wide variety of practices and relationships, including but not limited to kinship, sexual encounters, body and gender, dis/abilities, migration, friendship, birth and death, romantic relationships, non-monogamies, dating or community formation. Each of these finds different forms in its mediatization. Simultaneously “new media” comprises a variety of digital platforms that offer distinctive ways to share, connect and communicate; differences in hardware and software intersect with situated sociocultural norms about technology use. The combination of intimate practices and new media thus poses challenges to existing methodological paradigms due to the limitations/affordances of the medium intersecting with continuously shifting practices of intimacy. This special issue will present a range of intimate practices as well as a selection of digital sites and apps. In so doing, a variety of different methodological issues will be highlighted and discussed.

Suggestions for topics that contributors may wish to engage with include, but are not limited to:

- Logistical and technical difficulties in collecting ephemeral or unstable personal data

- Intimacy and loneliness of the researcher

- Commercialization of online intimacies

- The blurring of personal/professional lines of conduct as a researcher

- The borderline between “lurking”, voyeurism and participation

- Public intimacies in private spaces – accessing and exiting personal spaces as fieldsites

- Technical glitches in online intimacies

- The illusion of online anonymity or distance

- Negotiating national differences in ethical guidelines for online collection of ”intimate” data

- Tracking intimacies over time, space and media

- Capturing and processing vast amounts of intimate data

- Finding participants when the topic provokes shame, anger, or embarrassment

- How multiple understandings of “intimacy” affect methodology

- Sudden changes to fieldsites in response to public outcry/moral outrage

- Adapting old methods to new and slippery fieldsites

- Legal frameworks as intimate practices move between screen and materiality

- Inclusion/exclusion mechanisms and accessibility
We welcome papers from a wide range of disciplines. The editors welcome expressions of interest and are happy to discuss proposals for contributions.

Please send your abstract to: tjx856@hum.ku.dk AND mariabee@ruc.dk . Abstracts should be maximum 500 words long and written in English. Please include your name, title, and affiliation. Deadline for submission of abstracts: 1 December 2016

If accepted, final versions of papers should follow the Qualitative Inquiry submission guidelines which can be viewed here: https://uk.sagepub.com/en-gb/eur/qualitative-inquiry/journal200797#submission-guidelines

Please note that the Editors of the journal reserve the right to reject special issues and/or individual articles at any point in the review process.

FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON THE HISTORY OF RECENT SOCIAL SCIENCE

June 09 2017 to June 10 2017 | Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Deadline: February 03 2017

www.hisress.org

Updated: October 07 2016

This two-day conference of the Society for the History of Recent Social Science (HISRESS) will bring together researchers working on the history of post-World War II social science. It will provide a forum for the latest research on the cross-disciplinary history of the post-war social sciences, including but not limited to anthropology, economics, psychology, political science, and sociology as well as related fields like area studies, communication studies, history, international relations, law and linguistics. We are especially eager to receive submissions that treat themes, topics, and events that span the history of individual disciplines.

The conference aims to build upon the recent emergence of work and conversation on cross-disciplinary themes in the postwar history of the social sciences. A number of monographs, edited collections, special journal issues, and gatherings at the École normale supérieure de Cachan, Duke University, Harvard University, the London School of Economics, New York University, the University of Toronto and elsewhere testify to a growing interest in the developments spanning the social sciences in the early, late, and post-Cold War periods. Most history of social science scholarship, however, remains focused on the 19th and early 20th centuries, and attuned to the histories of individual disciplines. Though each of the major social science fields now has a community of disciplinary historians, research explicitly concerned with cross-disciplinary topics remains comparatively rare. The purpose of the conference is to further encourage the limited but fruitful cross-disciplinary conversations of recent years.

Submissions are welcome in areas such as:

- The uptake of social science concepts and figures in wider intellectual and popular discourses - Comparative institutional histories of departments and programs - Border disputes and boundary work between disciplines as well as academic cultures - Themes and concepts developed in the history and sociology of natural and physical science, reconceptualized for the social science context - Professional and applied training programs and schools, and the quasi-disciplinary fields (like business administration) that typically housed them - The role of social science in post-colonial state-building governance - Social science adaptations to the changing media landscape - The role and prominence of disciplinary memory in a comparative context

The two-day conference, hosted by the Erasmus Institute for Public Knowledge in collaboration with the Erasmus School of History, Culture and Communication and the Faculty of Social Sciences at Erasmus University Rotterdam, will be organized as a series of one-hour, single-paper sessions attended by all participants. Ample time will be set aside for intellectual exchange between presenters and attendees, as all participants are expected to read pre-circulated papers in advance. Proposals should contain no more than 1000 words, indicating the originality of the paper. The deadline for receipt of abstracts is February 3, 2017. Final notification will be given in early March 2017 after proposals have been reviewed. Completed papers will be expected by May 15, 2017.

The organizing committee consists of

Jamie Cohen-Cole (George Washington University), Bregje van Eekelen (executive organizer, Erasmus University Rotterdam), Philippe Fontaine (École normale supérieure de Cachan), and Jeff Pooley (Muhlenberg College)

All proposals and requests for information should be sent to: hisress2017@gmail.com. For more information on the Society for the History of Recent Social Science (HISRESS), see the website.

Linda Hall Library Seeks Fellows Among Science, Technology Historians

Deadline: January 16 2017

http://www.lindahall.org/fellowships

Updated: October 05 2016

The Linda Hall Library is pleased to announce its fellowship program for the academic year 2017/18. Fellowships, lasting anywhere from one week to a full academic year, are awarded to outstanding projects in history of science and related science and technology studies fields that make use of the Library’s collections. Awards range from up to $3,000 per month for pre-doctoral fellows to $4,200 per month for post-doctoral fellows.

For the academic year 2017/18, the Linda Hall Library will also launch its innovative 80/20 Fellowship. To prepare graduate students for diverse career possibilities, 80/20 pre-doctoral fellows will spend 80% of their time pursuing dissertation-related research in the Library’s collections and 20% gaining valuable career-related skills as they plan, curate, and mount an exhibition based on their research and Library’s holdings.

The Linda Hall Library, located next to the University of Missouri-Kansas City in Kansas City, Mo., is among the world’s leading independent research libraries, boasting extensive primary and secondary sources related to environmental sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, earth sciences, engineering, astronomy, meteorology, and the life sciences. The Library holds more than 10,000 rare books dating from the 15th century to the present, as well as 500,000 monograph volumes and more than 48,000 journal titles from around the world, with especially strong holdings in Soviet and East Asian science. Its collections also contain conference proceedings, government publications, technical reports, and over 200,000 industrial standards. Fellows at the Linda Hall Library participate in a vibrant intellectual community alongside in-house scholars and colleagues from nearby research institutions.

For more information and to apply online by January 16, 2017, visit: http://www.lindahall.org/fellowships

Postdoctoral Fellowships, Science in Human Culture Program Northwestern University

Deadline: January 09 2017

http://www.shc.northwestern.edu/post-doctoral/

Updated: September 22 2016

The Science in Human Culture Program (SHC) at Northwestern University invites applications for two-year postdoctoral fellowships in the contextual study of science, technology, or medicine, to run September 1, 2017 – August 31, 2019. Two Fellows will be selected. Applications are welcome from scholars who study science, technology, or medicine in any region of the world and from any of a range of historical, philosophical, sociological, anthropological, or literary perspectives. Each Fellow will be affiliated with both the SHC program and an appropriate disciplinary department in Weinberg College (History, Sociology, Philosophy, Anthropology, etc.).

Fellows will pursue a program of independent scholarship under the guidance of a faculty mentor. They will also design and teach two undergraduate courses each year, over the course of the three-quarter-long teaching year. (Typically these will be one seminar and one lecture course, to be listed by the affiliated department.) Fellows will also help organize and run the SHC visiting lecturer series. They are expected to be active participants in intellectual activities in both SHC and their affiliated departments and to deliver one public lecture each year.

Applicants with a Ph.D. (or equivalent doctoral degree) must have completed it after September 1, 2012. Applicants without a Ph.D. (or equivalent doctoral degree) must complete all the requirements for the degree before September 1, 2017. At time of application, the applicant must be available for the full two-year term. The stipend is $56,500 in the first year of the fellowship. In addition, the Fellow is eligible for $3,500 per year to fund research and conference travel, and up to $1,500 for allowable relocation expenses in the first year. This is a full-time, benefits eligible position.

In order to ensure full consideration, all application materials other than letters of recommendation must be received by January 9, 2017. Letters of recommendation are due no later than January 16, 2017. Because your references will not receive submission instructions until you submit your completed application, we recommend that you submit your application well before the deadline.

For FAQs and details on preparing an application and applying online, please visit http://www.shc.northwestern.edu/post-doctoral/. Administrative questions not addressed on the webpage should be directed to Natasha Dennison at shc-program@northwestern.edu. Substantive questions may be addressed to the program director at helen.tilley@northwestern.edu. For more information about departments or programs at Northwestern, see http://offices.northwestern.edu/browse/A/academic.

AA/EOE. Northwestern University is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer of all protected classes including veterans and individuals with disabilities. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. Hiring is contingent upon eligibility to work in the United States.

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Urban Infrastructure History and the Social Sciences

May 30 2017 to June 01 2017 | NYU Paris

Deadline: September 01 2016

Updated: September 15 2016

Recent work in history, anthropology, science and technology studies, geography, resilience/sustainability and other disciplines has explored the multiple social effects of infrastructure. Studies of electric power networks, aqueducts, roads and waste disposal systems have examined not only the provision of services to urban residents, but also distributions of political power, the organization of capital, contentious claims by and about labor, and environmental and distributional inequalities. Social histories and ethnographies of public and private infrastructure have demonstrated that infrastructures reshape the lives of their users even as urban residents fight to reshape it to their own ends. This work has revealed both the material grounding of urban social relations and the social life of material infrastructure. Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the History and Social Life of Urban Infrastructure seeks to extend and expand this work.

The conference will bring together humanists, social scientists, and those from other disciplines studying urban infrastructure’s past, present, and future. The symposium aims to allow examination of questions including: 1. How should we understand the role of infrastructural networks in the historical development and daily social life of cities? 2. How has the development of infrastructure shaped the expectations of urban citizenship? What happens when these expectations go unrealized? 3. How should we understand the ways in which infrastructure produces or diminishes urban space and power relations? 4. What is the relationship between infrastructure and the organization of urban political power, including issues of citizenship, governmentality, and claims of rights to the city? 5. How have the resource allocations of urban infrastructure reshaped the non-human world, both within and beyond the city? 6. How has infrastructure developed differently in cities under colonial, post-colonial, socialist, Keynesian, and neo-liberal governing regimes? 7. What is the role of urban infrastructure in shaping community and supporting resilience, and how has this role emerged and evolved over time? In order to allow comparison of methodologies for the study of infrastructure, the conference aims to include scholars employing ethnographic, quantitative, and archival approaches. To enable comparison across time and place, the organizers hope to include scholars working on cities in Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas. We welcome submissions examining both modern and early modern eras.

The symposium will be held at NYU Paris May 31-June 1, 2017, co-sponsored by the NYU Department of History, the Department of Technology, Culture, and Society at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, and NYU Shanghai and funded by a grant from the NYU Provost’s Global Initiatives. The conference papers and presentations will be in English. The conference will be limited to a maximum of thirty papers, limited to ten double-spaced pages. Papers will be due by April 1, 2017 and pre-circulated, with a short oral presentation by the author, followed by two commentators and discussion on the floor. Those interested in presenting should submit abstracts of no more than 250 words by September 1, 2016 and will be selected by the organizing committee. Abstracts should be sent to Krysta Battersby, Project Manager, Department of Technology, Culture and Society, NYU Tandon School of Engineering Infrastructureconference2017@nyu.edu.

Stop Making Sense: A conversation between sensory and social science about food and drink

March 10 2017 |

Deadline: October 31 2016

Updated: September 15 2016

Sensory experience as a subject of study has long been a focus of multiple disciplines; yet only recently has the sensory experience of food – how it tastes and why that matters – become fodder for serious discussion. We are seeking submissions of work for a one-day symposium on the study of the senses from an interdiscilpinary perspective hosted at The Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia, on March 10, 2017. Within food science – a natural home for inquiry into food’s sensory properties – sensory scientists have designed tools and methods to measure and interpret sensory perception.

Meanwhile, within the social sciences, a growing body of researchers, including anthropologists, sociologists, historians, and philosophers have turned their attention to determining the social, cultural, and other context that shape the operation of the senses and the meanings individuals take from sensory knowledge. However, there have been few opportunities, and few incentives, for productive dialogue among sensory researchers across these fields and disciplines, especially across the perceived chasm separating food-sensory science and the humanities and social sciences. This gathering aims to combat the status quo by encouraging productive conversation and collaboration through bringing together scholars in multiple fields concerned with the study of human sensory experience of in food and drink. We seek to provoke a discussion that unsettles the presumptions of investigators in both the sciences and the humanities, to expand the methodological approaches of researchers in both fields to better attend to the previously unconsidered or overlooked, and ultimately to enrich practices of documenting, learning about, and accessing sensory experience. On the one hand, sensory evaluation as a field of study within food science has designed tools for the measurement of sensory perception.

Through experimental protocols aimed at quantitation, sensory scientists seek to access objective sensory experiences intrinsic to food itself. In fact, much of the disciplinary expertise within sensory evaluation is dedicated to the exclusion or control of biasing factors that are thought to contaminate this true experience. This approach has become extremely powerful in sensory knowledge-making; its influence can be seen from the designed environment of the “aesthetic-industrial complex” (Shapin 2012) to the everyday proliferation of taste tests claiming to show, for example, that Pepsi is “better” than Coke or that a particular brand of olive oil is the best. Despite this success, however, sensory scientists are increasingly aware of limitations in their disciplinary foundations – physiology, psychology, and other behavioral sciences (Köster 2009) – and are looking to understand and theorize information that until now has been dismissed as biasing or contextual. On the other hand, anthropologists, sociologists, historians, and other social scientists have begun to approach the same issues being tackled by sensory scientists. These scholars seek to understand the operation of the senses and the influence of political, social, and cultural practices on sensory knowledge.

Recently, social scientists interested in the “sciences of subjectivity” (Howes 2015, Shapin 2012) have expanded their examination to the practices of sensory scientists themselves. Despite this growing area of shared interest, social scientists have largely hesitated to directly engage with sensory scientists or employ the methodologies and theories sensory scientists have developed. This has led to the production of separate bodies of knowledge and theory, with too little cross-pollination. Despite theoretical and disciplinary divides, researchers investigating the senses face similar questions and challenges. How can the content of individual, subjective sensory experience be articulated and comprehended by others? How do cultural, social, and environmental factors impinge on sensory experience, and vice versa? In studying sensory perception, what – the material, the environment, the context, the culture – ”counts”? What is the role of human interpretation – subjectivity – in the measurement of sensory experiences and attributes? Fundamentally, what is the relationship between sensory experience and context? Confirmed Keynote Speakers: Hildegarde Heymann, Distinguished Professor of Viticulture and Enology, University of California–Davis Steven Shapin, Franklin L. Ford Research Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University We are seeking papers, presentations, and other works that examine the study of the senses, on topics including but not limited to: ● Methodologies and Practices of Studying Sensory Experiences – what are discipline- specific methods of engaging with and rigorously studying sensory experience? ○ Sites of Investigation — the laboratory, the field, the archive. How do different disciplines define appropriate sources of sensory information? ○ Instruments and Technologies — how do particular technologies of data collection influence how the senses are understood and known, and how have historical conceptions of sensory knowledge shaped the design of instruments to study and measure sensation? ○ Limits — are there limits to what we can know or say about the senses? how are these limits constituted? ● Defining and Communicating about Sensory Experience ○ Epistemology – how are the senses and sensory experience defined, accessed, and understood within and across disciplines? What epistemological techniques impede inter-disciplinary communication? ○ Assumptions – What implicit and explicit assumptions are present in field-specific practices of defining, researching, and talking about sensory experience? What are the effects of those assumptions? ○ Objectivity – sensory science claims to capture and make visible the universal aspects of sensory experience; how does it accomplish its goals, and what challenges or barriers might be apparent to different disciplines? ● Designing and Making Sensory Experience ○ Labor — What labor happens in making sensory authority or expertise? Is there a viable category of “sensory labor”? ○ Language and Food Design – sensory science is already intimately engaged in the design of everyday products; how can (or should) other disciplines become involved? ○ Applied Science — how does the commercial application of sensory research shape the questions that are asked, the conclusions that are drawn? Who (or what) is “the consumer” imagined by various disciplines of sensory research? Deadline: Abstracts are due October 31, 2016.

Please submit all abstracts to foodsensory@drexel.edu. Outcomes: Conference papers will be compiled and published into an edited volume Contact: Jake Lahne, jl3542@drexel.edu Where: Philadelphia PA When: March 10, 2017 at the Chemical Heritage Foundation Registration Fee: $30, due upon paper acceptance Organized by: Jacob Lahne (Drexel University), Christy Spackman (Harvey Mudd College), Nicholas Shapiro (Chemical Heritage Foundation), Nadia Berenstein (University of Pennsylvania), Ana Maria Ulloa (New School), Ella Butler (University of Chicago), and Camille Bégin (University of Toronto Scarborough) Jointly sponsored by: Drexel University and the Chemical Heritage Foundation

Call for Papers: Experiments in Force? Science and the Apparatus of Warfare

April 05 2017 to April 09 2017 | Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting, Boston, MA (USA)

Updated: September 15 2016

Recent developments in the means and techniques of warfare have raised questions anew about the spatial delimitation of the battlefield, the legal and ethical norms about killing, and the migration of military technologies to other spheres of security practice. In response, scholars from a variety of disciplines have worked to make sense of these changing geographies of war and violence through scholarship on weapons systems, algorithmic surveillance, special operations, and logistics and infrastructure. Within this work, one approach has been to explore warfare as a set of interrelated processes and has emphasized the longer genealogies and historical geographies of the technologies and materialities of these practices (Kim 2016, Gordillo 2014, Chamayou 2015, Salter 2015, 2016). Less attention, however, has been devoted to historical role of science, and particularly scientific experimentation and testing, in designing, using and managing the scope and consequences of these war technologies and practices over time (c.f. De Landa 1991, Bousquet 2009, Howell 2011, Johnson 2015). Drawing on a tradition of viewing science as a political practice (Latour 1987, Schaffer and Shapin 1985, Daston and Galison 2010), this panel will recast recent attention to the ‘apparatus’ of war – the collection of actors, objects, practices and discourses through which violent action is constituted (Gregory 2011, Bolton 2015). Focusing on the role of experimental practice in the evolution of the fields – spaces and objectives – of battle, the objective is to consider the consequences not only for means and mechanisms that become possible, but also permissible. The focus is therefore to examine the settings in which techniques and technologies are tested out and in time become standardized, such that the violence of war becomes rational, legal and ethical. We are especially interested in papers, both historical and contemporary in scope, related to (but not excluded to) the changing targets and targeting of killing, the intersection of the spaces of science and war (such as laboratories, testing grounds and military industries), the historical and recent geographies of cyberspace and cyberwarfare, the intersection between medicine and military practice, and the epistemological frameworks underpinning practices of science and warfare.

Please send abstracts (250 words) and/or questions to Katharine Kindervater (katharine.h.kindervater@dartmouth.edu) and Nisha Shah (nisha.shah@uottawa.ca) by October 1, 2016

Bolton M (2015) From Minefields to Minespace: An Archeology of the Changing Architecture of Autonomous Killing In US Army Field Manuals On Landmines, Booby Traps and IEDs. Political Geography 46: 41-53.

Bousquet A (2009) The Scientific Way of Warfare: Order and Chaos on the Battlefields of Modernity. London: Hurst Publishers.

Chamayou, G (2015) A Theory of the Drone. New York: The New Press.

Daston L and Galison P (2010) Objectivity. New York: Zone Books.

Gordillo G (2015) Rubble: The Afterlife of Destruction. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Gregory, D (2011) From a View to Kill: Drones and Late Modern War. Theory, Culture, and Society 29: 188-215.

Howell, A (2011) Madness in International Relations: Psychology, Security and the Global Governance of Mental Health. London and New York: Routledge.

Johnson, E (2015) Of Lobsters, Laboratories, and War: Animal Studies and the Temporality of More-Than-Human Encounters. Environment and Planning D 33 (2): 296-313.

Kim EJ (2016) Toward an Anthropology of Landmines: Rogue Infrastructure and Military Waste in the Korean DMZ. Cultural Anthropology 31(2): 162-187.

Salter M (ed.) Making Things International 1: Circuits and Motion. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2015.

Salter M (ed.) Making Things International 2: Catalysts and Reactions. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2016.

Rust/Resistance: Works of Recovery

June 20 2017 to June 24 2017 | Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan

Deadline: February 15 2017

http://asle2017.clas.wayne.edu

Updated: September 15 2016

2017 Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (ASLE) Biennial Conference

In Rust: The Longest War, Jonathan Waldman claims that, for those who “yield to rust, find beauty in rust, capitalize on rust, raise awareness of rust, and teach about rust, work is riddled with scams, lawsuits, turf battles, and unwelcome oversight. Explosions, collisions, arrests, threats, and insults abound.” Rust is the underside of cosmopolis. Rust belts follow industry and its corrosions; the parasitic Rust fungi are enemies of agriculture. And yet there is an irenic side to rust: it inspires contemplation, the search for beauty, and the effort to defend what is threatened. As an agent of time, rust sponsors stories of collapse-and-recovery, evolution-and-extinction, but it also questions them. Narratives of progress that see rust as the enemy are not universal. In Japanese aesthetics, for instance, sabi is the beauty of natural aging and aged materials; what is new is not as lovely as what has weathered. In a time obsessed by environmental apocalypse, rust may reveal other trajectories for cultures of recovery.

Resurget Cineribus, “It Will Rise from the Ashes,” is the motto of Detroit—our host city. Long associated with steel, car culture, and the music of Motown, Detroit is also a site of struggle for racial and environmental justice, against depopulation and “ruin porn,” and for the preservation of artistic heritage. A nexus of encounters between indigenous nations and the French fur trade, it became a locus of the Great Migration, “white flight,” and gentrification. Water-rich on the strait between Lake Huron and Lake Erie, Detroit and its neighbors struggle against corroded infrastructure and government corruption. For all those reasons, Detroit is an ideal place to confer about rust, resistance, and recovery. We invite participants to interpret the conference theme as broadly as possible and to imagine their work in terms of content and form. We particularly encourage non-traditional modes of presentation, including hybrid, performative and collaborative works; panels that minimize formal presentation in favor of engaged emergent discussion; interdisciplinary approaches; environmentally inflected readings of fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, film, theatre and other media; and proposals from outside the academic humanities, including submissions from artists, writers, teachers, practitioners, activists and colleagues in the social and natural sciences.

Proposals must be submitted online at https://asle.submittable.com/submit All proposals must be submitted by December 12, 2016. We will evaluate your proposal carefully and notify you of its final status by February 15, 2017. If you are a panel organizer and would like a panel CFP posted to the ASLE website, please use the online submission form here: http://www.asle.org/panel-calls-for-papers/. Note: you must be or become a member of ASLE by the time of registration to present at the conference. Join or check your membership status at http://www.asle.org/. Read full CFP here:http://www.asle.org/wp-content/uploads/ASLE-2017-CFP.pdf

Peter K. New Student Research Competition/Award, Society for Applied Anthropology

Deadline: December 31 2016

https://www.sfaa.net/about/prizes/student-awards/peter-new/

Updated: September 05 2016

The Society for Applied Anthropology sponsors an annual research competition for students (graduate and undergraduate) in the social and behavioral sciences.

Three cash prizes will be awarded:

First prize: $3,000
Second prize: $1,500
Third prize: $500

In addition, each of the three winners will receive travel funds ($350) to attend the annual meeting of SfAA (in Santa Fe, NM, in March, 2017). A Baccarat crystal trophy will be presented to the first place winner.

The competition and award honors the late Peter Kong-ming New, a distinguished medical sociologist-anthropologist. The deadline for receipt of submissions is December 31, 2016.

Please go to the SfAA web site (https://www.sfaa.net/about/prizes/student-awards/peter-new/) for additional information on the New Competition and Award.

Special Issue of Design Issues: Organizing provocation, conflict and appropriation

Deadline: January 10 2017

Updated: August 13 2016

Contribute to a Special Issue of Design Issues: Organizing provocation, conflict and appropriation: The role of the designer in making publics

Because of the importance of the role and embodiment of the designer/artist in making publics, this special issue draws attention to reflexive practices in Art & Design, and questions how these practices can be embedded in the formations and operations of publics and design practices. More specifically, the special issue aims to explore the following questions: How do the designer/artist create and maintain publics? How do we accommodate differences in these agonistic spaces? What is the role of the designer/artist in these contexts? How can we understand the tension between artistic control in speculative design and empowerment in participatory design?

This issue will contain the best papers received and presented in the corresponding workshop in the Participatory Design Conference in Aarhus in August 2016 (PDC2016) entitled “Ting: Making publics through provocation, conflict and appropriation”, as well as other invited contributions. We invite researchers, designers, activists, artists, who in their work are exploring utopian, speculative, and critical design projects as well as designing for and with social movements, alternative societies and relational economies, to contribute to the theme of ‘Organizing provocation, conflict and appropriation: The role of the designer in making publics’. Authors are invited to consider (but are not limited to) the following issues and questions for this special issue: Design as world making and as a way to create a public space Agonistic public spaces versus consensual decision-making; The role of the author/designer/creator/artist in speculative and critical design in relation to participatory design; Politics of Participation Exclusion and inclusion in the design practice; Norms in speculative participatory design practices The tension between artistic control in speculative design and empowerment in participatory design The tension between empowerment and exploitation, between participation and precarious labor

GUEST EDITORS Shaowen Bardzell, Indiana University Tessy Cerratto Pargman, Stockholm University Carl DiSalvo, Georgia Institute of Technology Laura Forlano, Illinois Institute of Technology Karin Hansson, Stockholm University (Managing Guest Editor, khansson@dsv.su.se )

Jaz Hee-jeong Choi, Queensland University of Technology Somya Joshi, Stockholm University Silvia Lindtner, School of Information, University of Michigan

TIMELINE 01.9.2016: Submission deadline for intentions to contribute (1500-2000 words) 01.10.2016: Notification of relevance sent to authors / selected contributions invited to continue 01.12.2016: Full papers submission deadline for those selected to continue (5000 + references) 01.02.2017: Notification of accept / reject / revisions to authors 01.06.2017: Final manuscript submission deadline 15.09.2017: Final selected manuscripts to production

STS Underground: Investigating the Technoscientific Worlds of Mining and Subterranean Extraction

February 05 2017 to February 07 2017 | Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO

Deadline: September 15 2016

Updated: August 13 2016

A Three-Day Research Workshop

With keynote speaker Gabrielle Hecht, author of Being Nuclear: Africans and the Global Uranium Trade (MIT Press, 2012)

This intensive three-day workshop aims to bring together interdisciplinary scholars whose work addresses technologies, practices, and forms of knowledge related to the mining of minerals, groundwater and fossil fuels. We seek papers that examine the technoscientific aspects of how questions about extraction are posed and deliberated, how extraction itself occurs, and how the consequences of such extraction are addressed.

Twelve abstracts will be selected for the workshop, and authors will circulate their papers one month in advance. We encourage participation from graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty.

The workshop will include a public keynote address, a field trip/excursion with mining and petroleum experts, and a panel discussion with invited guest scholars. We will also include informal opportunities to network with fellow participants. Participants will not present their papers. Rather, submitted papers will be workshopped in small groups with an assigned discussant.

The deadline for submitting abstracts is September 15, 2016. Please send proposals (no more than one page for a single abstract, as a word or pdf document to phadke@macalester.edu and kincha@rpi.edu). Include full contact details (email, affiliation and address for contact). Notifications and initial program details will be sent out by November 1, 2016.

The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference

September 07 2017 to September 10 2017 | Athens

Deadline: February 15 2017

http://8toe2017.phs.uoa.gr/

Updated: May 10 2016

Borders and Technology

The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference will have as its main theme the history of borders and technology. We invite papers studying the history of the relationship between national borders and transnational infrastructures, hidden technological linking and delinking that reinforced or challenged border delineations and demarcations, the relationship between borders and technologically-induced environmental crises and disasters, the virtualization of borders and the territories that they contain through the use of electronic and related technologies, geopolitics and technology, the redefinition of borders due to the use of technology (and vice versa), all the way from the production to the circulation and use of goods and commodities. One central aim is to cross-fertilize between disciplines and we therefore invite contributions from a wide variety of historical disciplines as well as from fields like Migration and Border Studies, Migration History, Mobility History, etc, especially in connection to borders and migrations from, to and within Europe.

Themes that fall under the general agenda of the Tensions of Europe network are very welcomed (e.g. transnational histories of technology, history of European infrastructures and networks, environment and technology, the democracy-technology relationship, conflicting interests and technology, technology and hidden integration, technology and culture, gender and technology, technology and ethnicity, technology and disability).

Tensions of Europe has a long tradition of fostering alternative meeting formats. We encourage proposals for non-traditional sessions with different formats and new ideas (e.g. round tables, agenda-building sessions, brainstorm sessions, break-out groups with assignments, poster discussion, film discussion, event-based sessions). As long as quality can be demonstrated, the program committee will not prioritize between formats. By quality we mean suggestions that promise constructive, stimulating and engaging discussion.

We invite scholars from all relevant fields to submit proposal to the website.
by 15 February 2017

All proposals should include a title, short abstract, the academic title and affiliation of the applicant(s) and a short bio. Please name your file with your surname. Abstracts for individual papers and posters should be no more than 300 words. For panels, we ask for a description of the theme of the panel (max 300 words) together with shorter abstracts (max 150 words) of the individual papers. If you wish to suggest a presentation of a different format, please use these word limits as guidelines. We will inform applicants by April 1st 2017 whether their contribution has been accepted. A second call for papers with information about keynote speakers will be distributed by the end of 2016. Conference website: http://8toe2017.phs.uoa.gr/

Welcome to Athens in September 2017!

Aristotle Tympas (Chair of the Organizing Committee)

Division of History of Science and Technology Department of Philosophy and History of Science School of Science National and Kapodistrian University of Athens

The Tensions of Europe conference is organized biennially. Tensions of Europe is an interdisciplinary community of scholars who study the shaping of Europe by paying attention to the role of technology and material culture. It welcomes fruitful interaction between historians of technology and scholars who study technology from all other fields of the humanities and the social sciences (http://www.tensionsofeurope.eu). The 8th Tensions of Europe Conference will be co-organized by the Division of History of Science and Technology, Department of Philosophy and History of Science, School of Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (http://www.phs.uoa.gr/hst/) and the Foundation for the History of Technology (http://www.histech.nl/www/en/), which is hosted by the Eindhoven University of Technology.

New Edited Volume from Hindmarsh and Priestley, The Fukushima Effect: A New Geopolitical Terrain

https://www.routledge.com/products/9781138830783

Updated: February 04 2016

The Fukushima Effect: A New Geopolitical Terrain (2016, Routledge)
Edited by Richard Hindmarsh, Rebecca Priestley

The Fukushima Effect offers a range of scholarly perspectives on the international effect of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear meltdown four years out from the disaster. Grounded in the field of science, technology and society (STS) studies, a leading cast of international scholars from the Asia-Pacific, Europe, and the United States examine the extent and scope of the Fukushima effect. The authors each focus on one country or group of countries, and pay particular attention to national histories, debates and policy responses on nuclear power development covering such topics as safety of nuclear energy, radiation risk, nuclear waste management, development of nuclear energy, anti-nuclear protest movements, nuclear power representations, and media representations of the effect. The countries featured include well established ‘nuclear nations’, emergent nuclear nations and non-nuclear nations to offer a range of contrasting perspectives.

Bioethics Assistant Professor, Dept of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, University of Pennsylvania

https://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty_ad/index.php/g/d4054

Updated: November 07 2015

The Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania seeks candidates for an Assistant Professor position in either the non-tenure clinician-educator track or the tenure track. Track will be commensurate with experience. Responsibilities include 60% protected research time with minimal administrative commitments. The successful applicant will teach up to two courses a year in the Department’s graduate program. Applicants must have an M.D and/or Ph.D or equivalent degree.

Applicants who have earned a J.D. will also be considered. Applicants must have demonstrated excellent qualifications as a teacher and bioethics-related scholar.

The Department is dedicated to advanced empirical and conceptual research on theoretical and applied issues in bioethics. We are seeking a scholar whose work bridges empirical and conceptual methods and has concrete and substantial policy implications. The successful candidate will be expected to seek grant funding to support her/his research activities as well as a portion of her/his salary.

The Department has four major areas of research focus: resource allocation and priority-setting, global health ethics, neuroethics, and ethics and policy in science and research. There are 11 full time faculty members in the Department, with backgrounds ranging from medicine to philosophy to law to anthropology. Salary is a 12-month competitive salary based on medical school scale. Proposed start date is July 1, 2016 or later.

Applicants should upload a CV, cover letter, and statement of research interest (maximum 2 pages) with the online application.

We seek candidates who embrace and reflect diversity in the broadest sense.

The University of Pennsylvania is an EOE. Minorities/Women/Individuals with disabilities/Protected Veterans are encouraged to apply.

Apply for this position online at: https://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty_ad/index.php/g/d4054

Call for Reviews: Volumen 5 (1): “Science, Technology, Society – and the Americas?”

Deadline: December 15 2015

http://www.crolar.org/about

Updated: November 06 2015

Technological and scientific innovations affect society. How would you access, read and process this call for CROLAR if not on a computer screen? Through webpages, email, and social networks, we are able to distribute information in an instant, to connect with people across spatial and social boundaries, to maintain personal bonds and to create collectives that transcend the online/offline division. At the same time, technological and scientific innovations also dissolve collectivity and dis-connect people. New and old forms of exclusion and discrimination are (re-)produced along the lines of age, gender, race, class, or geographical location. Re/configurations of the social through science and technology have been studied for a wide range of subjects – from the mundane world of domestic appliances such as Cowan’s “Where the Refrigerator Got its Hum” (Cowan 1985), through to the futuristic public transport project of Latour’s Aramis (Latour 1996), all the way to “Seeing like a Rover” on Mars (Vertesi 2012). Beginning with the work of Robert Merton in the 1940s in which he analysed science as a social institution (Merton 1973), this field has since developed into a heterogeneous set of studies focusing on the various relations between science and technology, and society.

Instead of assuming that innovations or paradigmatic changes occur out of nothing, these scholars increasingly combine perspectives from the fields of anthropology, sociology, political science, philosophy, history and communication studies to account for the complex constellations of actors behind processes such as scientific ‘discoveries’ and technological inventions. Criticising and adding to these perspectives, feminist and postcolonial authors like Donna Haraway, Karen Barad, Helen Verran, and Sandra Harding have pointed us to the power-asymmetries and unequal distributions of agency amongst those actors. In the meantime, Latin America was developing its own studies into the rapport between society and science and technologies, spurred by scientists and engineers concerned with the disconnect between the knowledge being produced locally and the influence and pressures from the global North (Kreimer 2007). More recently, research concerned with social inequality in Latin America has developed new concepts such as “social technologies” (tecnologías sociales), technologies dedicated to resolving social or environmental problems (Thomas 2011). Perhaps ironically, research such as Thomas’ and other Latin-American authors’ are outnumbered in mainstream academic journals of the field in favor of publications and projects that focus on social and techno-scientific processes in the US and Europe.

This Volume of CROLAR asks about the other part of the Americas: What can authors from the global North learn from the rich and long-standing tradition of research at the intersection of technology/science and social inequality, politics, or activism from or about Latin America? We are calling for reviews on recent publications that develop a critical perspective on the influence of technology and science on society – or vice versa! We are especially interested in reviews that interrogate the potential of those studies for countering social and political inequalities by making knowledges that have long-time been exclusively shared among “experts” in the natural sciences available to a broader public. In addition to traditional single-book reviews, this volume features a new CROLAR-format of review articles with a thematic focus. These reviews should cover 3-5 books on current debates or a given topic. We are also actively encouraging reviews on works that transcend the limits of academic production, aimed at a larger audience and related to current events. They will be published in the section “interventions” and may include reviews of works by journalists, activists, practitioners, artists and others. For this particular section we suggest reviewers to write about projects that do not have a book format, such as documentaries, blogs, websites and artistic projects.

Reviews must be sent before December 15th, 2015. Publication is planned for April 2016. Please get back to us as soon as possible so we can organize the volume and the ordering of review copies via CROLAR. Reviews might be written in English, German, Portuguese, or Spanish. Ideally, the review should be in a different language than the reviewed publication or project. The section policies and formal requirements for the reviews can be found at the website.

We are looking forward to reading from you! If you are interested in writing a review or have any other suggestions or questions please contact the editors of the volume: Laura Kemmer (laura.kemmer[at]fu-berlin.de) and Raquel Velho (raquel.velho.12[at]ucl.ac.uk).

About CROLAR
CROLAR is an online review journal offering critical reviews of recently published writings on Latin America, founded in July 2012 and domiciled at the Institute for Latin American Studies at the Freie Universität Berlin. It is an interdisciplinary journal embracing contributions on literary studies, history, sociology, economics, anthropology and political science. It is an open access and free to use journal. CROLAR is published twice a year and multilingual since July 2012.

Bibliography
Cowan, Ruth Schwartz. 1985. "How the refrigerator got its hum." In The Social Shaping of Technology, edited by Donald MacKenzie and Judy Wajcman, 202-218. Milton Keynes: Open University Press.

Kreimer, Pablo. 2007. "Social Studies of Science and Technology in Latin America: A Field in the Process of Consolidation." Science, Technology & Society 12 (1).

Latour, Bruno. 1996. Aramis, or, The love of technology. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.

Merton, Robert K. 1973. The sociology of science: Theoretical and empirical investigations: University of Chicago press.

Thomas, Hernán. 2011. "Tecnologías sociales y ciudadanía socio-técnica: notas para la construcción de la matriz material de un futuro viable." Ciência & Tecnologia Social 1 (1).

Vertesi, Janet. 2012. "Seeing like a Rover: Visualization, embodiment, and interaction on the Mars Exploration Rover Mission." Social Studies of Science 42 (3):393-414.

Institute for Advanced Studies

October 01 2016 to June 30 2017 | Graz, Austria

Deadline: December 31 2015

http://www.ias-sts.aau.at

Updated: November 06 2015

The IAS-STS in Graz, Austria, promotes the interdisciplinary investigation of the links and interactions between science, tech- nology and society, as well as technology assessment and research into the development and implementation of socially and

environmentally sound technologies. Broadly speaking, the IAS-STS is an institute for the enhancement of science, techno- logy and society studies. The IAS-STS invites researchers to apply for a stay between 1 October 2016 and 30 June 2017 as a

• Research Fellow (up to nine months); or, • Visiting Scholar (shorter period, e.g. a month).

The IAS-STS offers excellent research infrastructure. Close co-operation with researchers at the IFZ (Inter-University

Research Centre for Technology, Work and Culture), and the Graz unit of STS (Institute of Science, Technology and Society

Studies, Klagenfurt University), guest lectures, colloquia, workshops, and conferences provide an atmosphere of creativity

and scholarly discussion. Furthermore, we can offer five grants, worth EUR 940,- per month, for long-term Research Fellows

at the IAS-STS.

The Fellowship Programme 2016-2017 is dedicated to projects investigating the following issues:

1. Gender – Technology – Environment

This area of research particularly focuses on gender and queer dimensions in science and technology. On the one hand, individual

perspectives of actors in the technological field are taken into account; on the other hand, educational, organisational, societal, envi- ronmental, and political issues (e.g. queer ecology or environmental justice) are gaining more and more relevance. Queer perspectives

on STS are of special interest, including analyses of the reproduction of sexual binaries or reproductions of marginalized/hegemonic

positions and normalizations in and through science and technologies.

2. Life Sciences/Biotechnology

Applications are sought in two thematic areas: First, following some 20 years of public debate, agricultural biotechnology continues to be a

deeply controversial issue in the EU, partly fueled by progress in science and technology innovation such as GM industrial and energy crops,

or novel breeding techniques. Research should contribute to a better understanding of the regulatory, broader policy and governance

challenges of agricultural biotechnology, and/or explore strategies to manage these challenges. Second, in recent years, social studies of

the life sciences were bound to large scale research programmes. In many countries, these funding schemes have now come to an end.

This is an opportunity to review these previous programmes via collaborative engagement with the life sciences, as well as to explore new

ways of inquiry. Applicants are encouraged to address these issues when analysing the life sciences as a social process.

3. Sustainable and Innovative Public Procurement & Ecodesign

The supply side policy “Ecodesign”, and the demand side policy “Public Procurement” are used to support the transition towards

green, socially responsible and innovative markets. Nonetheless, scientific research in these respective fields is still limited. Re- searchers investigating the following areas are encouraged to apply: The environmental impact or the innovation potential of green

public procurement and “Ecodesign”; the impact of socially responsible public procurement; the hurdles, success factors, efficacy,

and wider implications of European or national policies for sustainable and innovative public procurement and “Ecodesign”.

4. Towards Low-Carbon Energy Systems

Based on analyses of social, technological and organisational frameworks of energy use, projects should contribute to the shaping

of sustainable energy, climate and technology policies. They should focus on socio-economic aspects of energy technologies or on

strategies of environmental technology policy. They should develop measures and strategies for the promotion of renewable energy

sources; for the transition to a sustainable energy system; or, contribute to the field of sustainable construction. Regional governance,

climate policy strategies, innovation policy, participation and the role of users are important themes. In addition, the Manfred Heindler

grant is awarded to research projects concerning the increased use of renewable energies and the more efficient use of energy.

5. Sustainable Food Systems

Food security, nutrition, food quality and safety, resource scarcity, carbon foot prints and other challenges faced in urban or rural

areas are currently dominating the industrialized and globalized food systems. Research applications exploring different forms of

sustainable food systems, as well as related social practices and socioeconomic/technical processes in the production, distribution,

marketing, and consumption of food are encouraged. A particular focus lies on governance mechanisms, policies, and their (potential)

contribution to a wider transformation towards more sustainable cities, regions and societies.

Applications must be submitted to the IAS-STS by 31 December 2015.

For application forms and further information:

Please visit our website: www.ias-sts.aau.at

Institute for Advanced Studies on Science, Technology and Society (IAS-STS)

Attn. Günter Getzinger • Kopernikusgasse 9 • 8010 Graz • Austria • E-mail: ias-sts@aau.at

New Book from Bruno Cardoso: Todos os Olhos: videovigilancia voyerismos e (re)producao imagética

http://bit.ly/1HcDN9L

Updated: May 11 2015

Todos os Olhos: videovigilancia voyerismos e (re)producao imagética, by Bruno Vasconcelos Cardoso, edited for UFRJ, Brazil.

Sinopse:

Todos os olhos: videovigilâncias, voyeurismos e (re)produção imagética, livro de Bruno Vasconcelos Cardoso, acaba de ser lançado pela Editora UFRJ e aborda o fenômeno cada vez mais comum da vigilância por câmeras no espaço público urbano. Com enfoque na prática da vigilância eletrônica policial no Centro de Comando e Controle da Polícia Militar do Rio de Janeiro e na sala de monitoramento do 19º Batalhão da Polícia Militar, em Copacabana, a obra é resultado de uma pesquisa de doutorado, defendida como tese em maio de 2010.O autor, contudo, não para por aí, e analisa também o fenômeno da produção e disseminação das imagens captadas pelas câmeras privadas, como celulares e smartphones, imediatamente publicizadas nas redes sociais e nos programas de compartilhamento de imagens.No livro, Cardoso se debruça especialmente sobre as transformações na maneira como os humanos se relacionam com as imagens, com os meios técnicos que possibilitam essas relações e as estruturas de poder em que se inserem. Assim, policiamento, (in)segurança, tecnologia, imagem, comunicação, poder, crime, violência, espaço público, controle, flagrante, voyeurismo, criação e exibicionismo são os grandes temas que, inter-relacionados, perpassam o livro. A descrição rica e reflexiva que Cardoso faz de seu trabalho de campo, realizado em 2008, nos revela as surpresas, os disparates, os deslocamentos, os conflitos e os contrastes que se dão entre o projeto ideal e o efetivo trajeto da videovigilância policial em sua atividade. A pesquisa mostra também que a estética, o gozo e o prazer muitas vezes ocupam o lugar das funções de controle e segurança visados na videovigilância policial e constituem uma outra visão, denominada pelo autor de “videovoyeurismo”. Por fim, o livro mostra que enxergar pode ser não ver, e o olhar pode ser tanto mostrar quanto esconder. Ainda que transformações tenham ocorrido nesses anos que separam a publicação deste livro do início de sua pesquisa, ele permanece extremamente atual. A aquisição de um arsenal expressivo de novas tecnologias de vigilância, monitoramento e segurança (de drones a óculos com câmeras acopladas e transmissão de imagem em tempo real) para a realização da Copa do Mundo no Brasil meses atrás revela como a obra levanta e explora um campo de problemas cuja importância se intensificou. Os megaeventos são hoje uma das principais portas de entrada de dispositivos de vigilância e segurança do espaço urbano.

Inventing the Social

May 29 2014 to May 30 2014 | Goldsmiths University of London

http://goldsmithsdesignblog.com/2014/04/11/inventing-the-social/

Updated: April 23 2014

Celebrating 10 years of the Centre for the Study of Invention and Social Process Goldsmiths

This symposium celebrates the 10th year anniversary of CSISP, which quite miraculously coincides with the 50 year birthday of Goldsmiths Sociology. The event will explore the challenges associated with the 'return of the social', the pervasive suggestion that the 'social' is back, now that social media, social innovation and social design present and push themselves as objects, instruments and contexts of research and engagement. We ask: can we understand these phenomena as renewed efforts at the socialization of technology, the environment and associated entities? We are especially interested in recent claims to the effect that sociality is not only enacted, but can equally be invented, produced and generated with devices and settings. This also raises an experimental question for social and cultural research and theory themselves: how can we participate in the invention of socials?

With: Andrew Barry (UCL), Lisa Blackman (Goldsmiths), Nigel Clark (Lancaster University), Rebecca Coleman (Goldsmiths), Will Davies (Warwick University), Maarten Derksen (Universiteit Groningen), Ignacio Farias (WZB, Berlin), Carolin Gerlitz (University of Amsterdam), Michael Halewood (Essex), Anders Koed Madsen (Aalborg University Copenhagen), Bernd Kraeftner/Judith Kroell (Vienna), Daniel Lopez (Catalunya), Linsey McGoey (Essex), Liz Moor (Goldsmiths), Fabian Muniesa (Mines Tech, Paris), Dan Neyland (Goldsmiths), David Oswell (Goldsmiths), Marsha Rosengarten (Goldsmiths), Evelyn Ruppert (Goldsmiths), Manuel Tironi (Catholic University of Chile) Organisers: Noortje Marres, Michael Guggenheim & Alex Wilkie (Goldsmiths) All welcome. If you would like to participate, please register by sending an email to csisp@gold.ac.uk

Forced Migration:  Challenges and Change 3rd Annual Conference of the Canadian Association for Refu

May 06 2010 | McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario

Deadline: January 29 2010

Updated: February 14 2010

In recent years, the idea of change has charged political debate in countries around the world and has, in some cases, catalyzed the election of new governments and the creation of innovative programs and policies. This period has also been one of significant change for the field of forced migration. New policies and increasingly securitized perceptions of forced migration have created new practices such as interdiction, detention and expedited deportation that have changed the protection landscape in both the global North and South. At the same time as scholars have questioned the labelling and bureaucratic categorization of forced migrants, the United Nations has piloted new approaches to improve the protection and assistance available to members of traditionally marginalized ?categories?, particularly internally displaced persons. Massive displacement in the wake of Hurricane Katrina and Cyclone Nargis raised the profile of ?environmental refugees? as an issue predicted to grow in importance as the impacts of climate change become increasingly evident. In Canada, the government has recently announced that it is preparing a package of changes to the refugee determination system, including the fast-tracking of claims from countries that are generally considered safe. As a precursor to more sweeping anticipated changes, the government has already imposed visa requirements on Mexico and the Czech Republic in an attempt to stem the flow of refugee claimants from those countries.

The 2010 CARFMS Conference will bring together researchers, policymakers, displaced persons and advocates from diverse disciplinary and regional backgrounds to discuss the changes and challenges faced in the field of forced migration. We invite participants from a wide range of perspectives to explore the practical, experiential, policy-oriented, legal and theoretical questions raised by different processes of change affecting forced migrants at the local, national, regional and international levels. The conference will feature keynote and plenary speeches from leaders in the field, and we welcome proposals for individual papers and organized panels structured around the following broad sub-themes:


Asylum, protection and durable solutions: Needs, current practices and prospects for reform Calls for reform of national and international refugee protection systems have been raised in different quarters, with dramatically diverse visions for change. What are the key challenges facing advocates, policymakers and displaced communities and individuals? How have trends in the interception, interdiction, processing, detention, deportation, protection, settlement and integration of forced migrants shaped prospects for reform? What models might inform the productive reform of the Canadian refugee system? What role might scholars play in efforts to strengthen the protection of forced migrants and the effective resolution of displacement?

Theorizing the changing field of forced migration

Past decades have seen rapid development ? domestically and internationally ? in the study of refugee protection and forced migration both within traditional disciplines and across disciplinary lines. With such significant change in research and policy in recent years, the longer view ? both to the past and to the future ? cannot be neglected. What is the nature of refugee protection in a globalized world, and how is it important (or not) to consider the ?new? era? What have been the historical trajectories of laws, policies and practices in forced migration, and how can the historicization of the field advance understandings of change and contemporary challenges? How have different disciplines, methodologies and approaches affected our understandings? Finally, what role is there for actors outside of academia, from policymakers and refugee advocates to displaced persons themselves?


Experiencing displacement: Changes and challenges How have recent political and social changes, and changes in the structure and operation of the refugee regime affected the lives of displaced persons? What can scholars of forced migration learn about the contemporary reality of the refugee regime by focusing on the lived experience of displaced individuals and communities? In this section, we particularly welcome presentations by displaced individuals, advocates, and organizations working directly with forced migrants.

Pre-conference workshops/networking A number of pre-conference workshops and networking sessions will take place on the afternoon of May 5. More information on pre-conference workshops/session will be available on conference website shortly.


SUBMISSION OF ABSTRACTS Individuals wishing to present a paper at the conference must submit a 250-word abstract by January 29, 2010. The conference organizers welcome submissions of both individual papers and proposals for panels.

Please submit your abstract via the conference website: http://carfmsconference.yorku.ca/. For more information, please contact Heather Johnson johnsohl@mcmaster.ca

Call for Papers Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America

April 08 2010 | Venice, Italy

Deadline: May 15 2010

sarah@avenueDstereo.com

Updated: January 14 2010

Panel on: Artificial life: Golems, Homunculi, Automata
The definition of life seems to be a particularly 20th- or 21st- century conundrum with our current debates over the ethics of cloning, abortion, and stem-cell research. Although the Judeo-Christian creation story set forth in Genesis established orthodox views on the origins of life and the differences among humans and other animals, the period saw its own upheavals in the understanding of life, from the discovery of bizarre life forms in newly explored regions of the planet to the revelations of the microscope. I invite papers that look at the possibilities for artificial life or artificial intelligence, as they were explored in fields such as alchemy, natural philosophy, mechanics and clockworks, or mathematics. What does the early modern quest for artificial life tell us about religious, metaphysical, scientific, or political definitions of the body and mind? Please send a CV and abstract of no more than 150 words by 15 May to Sarah Benson, Saint John's College, Annapolis: sarah@avenueDstereo.com or sarah.benson@sjca.edu.

cAIR10 Applied Interculturality Research

April 07 2010 | University of Graz, Austria

Deadline: October 15 2009

http://www.uni-graz.at/fAIR/cAIR10/

Updated: January 14 2010

cAIR combines the resources of research (universities, institutes) and practice (government, civil society, NGOs, schools, media) to raise awareness about sexism, racism and xenophobia and reduce its prevalence and impact. cAIR helps practitioners to benefit from researchers, and researchers from practitioners - and promotes high standards in both areas. Keynote addresses will be given by international leaders in interculturality research and practice.

The extended deadline for submission of project summaries is October 15th - further information and the guidelines for the project summaries can be found on our homepage: http://www.uni-graz.at/fAIR/cAIR10/ Please send your project summaries to: cair10@uni-graz.at

International Conference on ICT for Africa 2010

March 25 2010 | Cameroon

http://www.icitd.org

Updated: January 14 2010

It is quite opportune that Africa has something to contribute to the information age. First, with innovations like mobile phones, we can say that Africa has not been left out. Africa is reported to be the world's single fastest-growing regional mobile market. Second, some researchers have noted that there tends to be mismatch between the realities for developing economies and assumptions of Western models of enterprise, thus as business practices evolve with their changing business environments, more research is needed to redefine existing knowledge to be consistent and applicable with the dynamic nature of the environment. These developments draw attention to a number of questions. What role can we play in the information age? Is Africa going to be only consumers of the information age or can Africa join the producers of ICT knowledge, products and services? What could be emergent patterns of ICT knowledge transfer in development? Is there an opportunity for unique contribution from Africa in this information age?
If there is, then let us tell the story of what we have in this conference. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), The National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) and The Louisiana Board of Regents, we are pleased to announce The International Conference on ICT for Africa 2010. The International Conference on ICT for Africa 2010 (ICIA 2010) is themed 'ICT for Development - Contributions of the South'.

This conference will bring together a fine mix of practitioners and academicians in the area of ICTs for sustainable development. The conference will explore the contributions of Africa to the global ICT for development discourse and efforts. The objective is to highlight the synergy of collaboration between African countries and other developing countries, and between African countries and the developed countries towards development solutions. Discussions and panel debates will therefore question how ICTs become the process for South-to-South knowledge transfer and South-to-North knowledge transfer in both research and practice. Workshops will explore international grant-seeking opportunities for ICT research and projects, e-learning for African universities and new frontiers in telemedicine and tele-neonatology research and practice in Africa. Visit the website at http://www.icitd.org..
Contact: ebeleokocha@yahoo.com

ICT and Development:Research Voices from Africa,  International Federation for Information Processin

March 22 2010 | Makerere University, Uganda

Deadline: November 30 2009

african-voices@googlegroups.com

Updated: January 14 2010

“ICT for development” has attracted wide attention for several years now. Often we hear about ICT in Africa, much more rarely about ICT from African voices. Why did our knowledge about the correlations between ICT and the economy and society fail to develop ICT to support development? Is the mainstream model of conceptualising and implementing ICT4D applicable and helpful in the African context? What are the alternatives to dominant approaches? This workshop is intended to provide a forum for discussion of ICT research approaches and findings that emerged from and relevant to the African contexts. We are particularly interested in receiving written submissions from African researchers in ICT for development, and from African intellectuals outside the mainstream ICT-based approach to economic growth and social improvements.
We welcome explanatory papers, aiming at analysis and understanding of ICT in actual African contexts. More precisely, the workshop invites short papers in the following focal areas: discontinuities between the African context and dominant ICT paradigm role of information, and ICT, within Africa and between Africa and the rest of the world barriers against Africa’s adoption, appropriation and autonomous use of ICT•cultural issues that may shape ICT adoption in unexpected ways•alternative strategies of ICT implementation and sustainability in Africa uncertainty, unpredictability, risk and serendipity related to ICT initiatives•role of ICT in empowerment, illiteracy, poverty eradication, and human development in Africa. The workshop is intended to be informal and inclusive in order to provide a “bigger picture” of ICT in Africa.
We welcome participants from academic institutions engaged in similar research, governmental and non-governmental organizations, public and private sector representatives, entrepreneurs and grass-root movements, civil society and ICT practitioners.
SubmissionsWe call for submission of short papers, in the form of long abstracts, up to 2000 words. Please send them as email attachments to this address:african-voices@googlegroups.com

Fourth International Conference on Design Principles and Practices

February 13 2010 | University of Illinois, Chicago

Deadline: June 11 2009

http://www.Design-Conference.com

Updated: January 14 2010

We are excited to be holding this year's Conference in Chicago, one of the world's great design cities. Chicago serves as a living history of modern architecture - the home of the world's first skyscrapers and, at various times, of architects Louis Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. More recently and notably in the global design scene, Chicago-based Sol Sender created the the design strategy and concept for the 2008 Obama campaign for the US Presidency. Chicago is also a marvelous city of art and design galleries, and museums, including a recently opened modern art wing to the Chicago Art Institute, designed by Renzo Piano. This dynamic history, and continuing spirit of creativity, makes Chicago an environment well suited to the goals and spirit of the International Conference on Design Principles and Practices.

The Design Conference is a place to explore the meaning and purpose of 'design', as well as speaking in grounded ways about the task of design and the use of designed artifacts and processes. The Conference is a cross-disciplinary forum that brings together researchers, teachers and practitioners to discuss the nature and future of design. In professional and disciplinary terms, the Conference traverses a broad sweep to construct a dialogue which encompasses the perspectives and practices of: anthropology, architecture, art, artificial intelligence, business, cognitive science, communication studies, computer science, cultural studies, design studies, education, e-learning, engineering, ergonomics, fashion, graphic design, history, information systems, industrial design, industrial engineering, instructional design, interior design, interaction design, interface design, journalism, landscape architecture, law, linguistics and semiotics, management, media and entertainment, psychology, sociology, software engineering and telecommunications.

This highly inclusive format provides Conference Delegates with significant opportunities to connect with people from shared fields and disciplines and with those from vastly different specialisations. The resulting conversations provide ample occasions for mutual learning, often weaving between the theoretical and the empirical, research and application, and market pragmatics and social idealism.

As well as an international line-up of plenary speakers, the Conference will also include numerous paper, workshop and colloquium presentations by practitioners, teachers and researchers. Presenters may choose to submit written papers for publication in the refereed Design Principles and Practices: an International Journal of Design Principles and Practices. If you are unable to attend the Conference in person, virtual registrations are also available which allow you to submit a paper for refereeing and possible publication, as well as access to the Journal.

Whether you are a virtual or in-person presenter at the Design Conference, we also encourage you to present on the Conference YouTube Channel. Please select the Online Sessions link on the Conference website for further details.

The deadline for the next round in the call for papers (a title and short abstract) is 11 June 2009. Future deadlines will be announced on the Conference website after this date. Proposals are reviewed within two weeks of submission. Full details of the Conference, including an online proposal submission form, may be found at the Conference website -
http://www.Design-Conference.com.

2010 College Art Association Conference

February 10 2010 | Chicago

Deadline: May 08 2009

(http://conference.collegeart.org/2010/

Updated: January 14 2010

Please see teh website for more information: (http://conference.collegeart.org/2010/) for more information about the conference and for details about how to submit a proposal. Proposals should be emailed directly to Aviva Dove Viebahn (adovevie@mail.rochester.edu) no later than May 8, 2009, with all CAA-required accompanying materials included.
http://www.iitd.ac.in/events/ICTD2010/

iConference Workshop on Sociotechnical systems, “Keywords of the Sociotechnical”

February 03 2010 | University of Illinois, Urbana Champagne

http://www.sociotech.net

Updated: January 14 2010

This workshop will provide a venue to gather and discuss our intellectual traditions, research objects, and vocabularies in order to elaborate and clarify the keywords of the sociotechnical.

The workshop builds on and extends efforts that have included the 2008 & 2009 Summer Research Institute of the Consortium for the Science of Sociotechnical Systems (CSST). These Research Institutes, supported by the National Science Foundation and held at the University of Michigan (2008) and Syracuse University (2009), brought together a diverse set of researchers from fields as diverse as science and technology studies, human-computer interaction, management and organizational studies, library and information science, sociology, social informatics, and computer science, to begin exploring and framing a future research agenda centered on socio-technical research.
http://www.sociotech.net . You may register
here: https://www.ischools.org/conftool/